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jerryking : heroes   28

The year in review: Canadians’ capital courage - The Globe and Mail
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Dec. 29 2014

In the aftermath of the attack, Canadians wondered how long it would take the country to return to normal. The real answer was, About three seconds, or whatever time it took for six people to rush in the direction of gunfire to help a wounded stranger....Canada’s greatest strengths are its compassion, freedom and proven courage. Those six in Ottawa who ran to Nathan Cirillo’s aid had no idea whether they were in equal danger, but they didn’t stop to think about it. Ms. Winters, Margaret Lehre, Martin Magnan, Kyle Button, Conrad Mialkowski and Tom Lawson have since become friends. They get together when they can. They don’t grandstand. They feel sad they couldn’t do more. They look out for each other. It is these qualities that will best guide Canada as it struggles through this peculiar age.
inspiration  editorials  Ottawa  Nathan_Cirillo  War_Memorial  heroes  terrorism  lone_wolves  strengths  home_grown  self-radicalization 
december 2014 by jerryking
N.Y. Military Museum Recognizes the Harlem Hellfighters - WSJ
by Leslie Brody Nov. 28, 2014

They were in heroes in France during World War I, only to be treated as second-class citizens when they returned to New York.

Now, the Harlem Hellfighters, a black infantry regiment that won awards for valor, are getting a new life online thanks to a project posting their personnel records on a museum website....The unit was originally formed as the 15th Colored Regiment of the New York National Guard, according to New York University Professor Jeffrey Sammons. Started in 1916, it was the first black National Guard unit recognized by New York, and one of the few black regiments that saw combat during World War I.

Because of racism in the military, the unit was kept separate from the rest of the state’s National Guard and trained separately, according to Mr. Sammons, co-author of a book on the subject, “Harlem’s Rattlers and the Great War: The Undaunted 369th Regiment and the African American Quest for Equality.”

The unit was sent to Europe to dig ditches, unload ships and build railroads but was deployed in combat in 1918 when the French military needed reinforcements, Mr. Sammons said.

He said the entire regiment won the high honor of a Croix de Guerre from the French government for its distinguished service, but then came home to have a parade in New York City that was separate from other events for returning veterans.
WWI  African-Americans  segregation  New_York_City  museums  heroes  France  second-class_citizenship 
november 2014 by jerryking
What unfolded during the attack in Ottawa - The Globe and Mail
KATHRYN BLAZE CARLSON, KIM MACKRAEL AND BILL CURRY
OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Oct. 22 2014
heroes  Ottawa  terrorism  Parliament  House_of_Commons  home_grown  self-radicalization 
november 2014 by jerryking
Sergeant-at-arms Kevin Vickers thrust into role of modern-day hero - The Globe and Mail
ERIN ANDERSSEN
OTTAWA — Globe and Mail Update (Includes Correction)
Published Wednesday, Oct. 22 2014
House_of_Commons  heroes  Parliament 
november 2014 by jerryking
Grieving soldiers resume their watch, vowing ‘we will carry on’ - The Globe and Mail
KATHRYN BLAZE CARLSON AND KIM MACKRAEL
OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Oct. 24 2014
heroes  Canadian  Ottawa  tragedies 
november 2014 by jerryking
Dr. Sheela Basrur, 51: Guided city through SARS | Toronto Star
By: Tanya Talaga Global Economics Reporter, Prithi Yelaja Staff Reporters, Published on Tue Jun 03 2008
SARS  Toronto  obituaries  women  heroes 
july 2013 by jerryking
Nine key traits to make the shift from failure to success - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Oct. 09 2012

1. Rebounders accept failure: They hate to fail, but they accept it, and try to fail productively, learning from the experience, as the inventive Thomas Edison did with his many failed experiments.

2. Rebounders compartmentalize options: They are often emotional people, with drive and passion. John Bogle, who founded Vanguard Group, was furious when he was pushed out of a previous job and even had revenge fantasies. But he didn’t spend time trying to get even. Rebounders control the emotional fallout of their struggle (i.e. emotional mastery).

3. Rebounders have a bias toward action: After Tammy Duckworth lost both legs when her U.S. military helicopter was shot down in Iraq, her first impulse was to get to work at rehabilitation and her new life. Rebounders keep pushing, keep doing.

4. Rebounders change their minds: They can discard old thinking, give up on long-held dreams, and adjust their ambitions to evolving situations. They don’t cling to ideas that are proving hopeless.

5. Rebounders prepare for things to go wrong: They don’t expect things to go their own way. They are cautious optimists, always aware their plans may go awry.

6. Rebounders are comfortable with discomfort: They are willing to accept hardships and inconveniences as long as they feel they are getting closer to their goal. Singer/songwriter Lucinda Williams could have signed a major recording deal years earlier if she had agreed to make the songs the music companies wanted, but she stayed true to her own vision, even if it meant often barely having the money to pay her rent.

7. Rebounders are willing to wait: They are determined to succeed on their own terms, and can accept that it might take a long time. “But rebounders don’t just wait positively for a lucky break, or do the same thing over and over. They constantly learn and get better, continually improving the likelihood of success until the odds tilt in their favour,” Mr. Newman observes.

8. Rebounders have heroes: Many of the rebounders he met are romantics, seeing their role as in some way historic, and they are entranced by some mentor or historical figure who they want to emulate. Vanguard’s Mr. Bogle, for example, often alluded to the naval battles of Admiral Lord Nelson and named his mutual fund company after his hero’s ship.

9. Rebounders have more than passion: We are told we need passion for success, but rebounders realize it requires more than that. They have a special drive and resilience that allows them to capitalize on their passion.
bouncing_back  resilience  Harvey_Schachter  emotional_mastery  personality_types/traits  ksfs  long-term  patience  preparation  contingency_planning  reflections  self-analysis  self-awareness  thinking_tragically  discomforts  strategic_patience  adaptability  inconveniences  passions  heroes  pragmatism  compartmentalization  action-oriented  hardships  next_play 
october 2012 by jerryking
Who are our heroes?
September 1, 2012 | Stabroek News | editorials.

Time and again, since the birth of our nation, we have shown ourselves to be susceptible to hero worship, to the cult of personality. We have an adolescent’s urge to revere (or revile) our political leaders where a healthy dose of scepticism and an appropriate measure of deference would serve us rather better. It is time to outgrow these teenage-style crushes. Ours is a complex country in need of complex characters to illuminate a path for us to tread.
leaders  leadership  heroes  Guyana  Guyanese  skepticism  personality_cults 
september 2012 by jerryking
Manhood and the Power of Glory
February 26, 1990 | TIME | by Lance Morrow

The movie Glory is, as the historian James M. McPherson has written, the most powerful and historically accurate film ever made about the American Civil War. But Glory, which tells the story of one of the war’s first black regiments, has deeper meaning. The movie addresses the most profound theme of race in America in 1990. Glory is about black manhood and responsibility.
The worst problems of the black underclass today—young black men murdering other young black men; young black males fathering children of females who are virtually children themselves; young blacks lost to crack and heroin—alI connect directly to black manhood and responsibility.
African-Americans  history  movies  Civil_War  masculinity  responsibility  fatherhood  self-help  heroes  inspiration 
september 2012 by jerryking
Above and Beyond - WSJ.com
February 25, 2003 | WSJ | By DOROTHY RABINOWITZ
Somalia  inspiration  heroes  U.S._military 
september 2012 by jerryking
A Medal of Honor - WSJ.com
October 23, 2007 | WSJ |editorial

Yesterday President Bush presented the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military honor for valor in combat, to the family of Lieutenant Michael P. Murphy, a Navy SEAL who was killed in Afghanistan in 2005. It is the third Medal of Honor bestowed in the war on terror, and all have been awarded posthumously.
heroes  SEALs  Afghanistan  editorials 
august 2012 by jerryking
Give all parents educational choice Why shouldn't black kids have their own heroes as models of courage, strength and wisdom? It won't make them any less Canadian
February 4, 2008 | Globe and Mail | TOM FLANAGAN.

Today, Alberta's public, Catholic, charter and provincially subsidized private schools offer distinctive programs and separate schools for many different minorities - Catholics, evangelical Protestants, Jews, aboriginals, girls, the gifted, the handicapped, those who want the "three Rs," those who want progressive education, etc. etc. The result? Alberta consistently scores the highest among Canadian provinces on international tests of student performance. Free choice and competition are showing what they can achieve when they are allowed to operate.

Much of Afrocentrism looks like rubbish to me. But I'm sure my Protestant neighbours thought the same of Catholic doctrines, such as papal infallibility, the Immaculate Conception, and the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary that I learned from the Sisters of Mercy at St. Columba's parochial school in Ottawa, Ill.

Any Afrocentric schools in Toronto will be operating on public money, so they should be required to teach the provincial curriculum. Similarly, the Sisters of Mercy didn't just teach catechism; they taught spelling and grammar and arithmetic, followed by algebra, Latin, and chemistry, and everything else needed to succeed in a secular society.

It also goes without saying that the nasty bits of Afrocentrism, e.g. that Jews were the world's leading slave traders, must be kept out of the schools. But that shouldn't be too hard to achieve. After all, it's been a long time since Catholic and Protestant schools taught that other Christians should be burned at the stake.

Identity is vital for children. I grew up American before becoming Canadian, but my Catholic schooling added another dimension, making me feel connected to 2,000 years of saints and martyrs, scholars and statesmen, kings and conquerors. Why shouldn't African-Canadian kids have their own heroes as models of courage, strength and wisdom? It won't make them any less Canadian.... keep trying other formulas until you find the one that works.
African_Canadians  TDSB  Afrocentric  freedom_of_choice  heroes  private_schools 
august 2012 by jerryking
The Real Legacy of Nelson Mandela - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 10, 2011

The Real Legacy of Nelson Mandela
The antiapartheid hero refused to launch a personality cult. Why have other African leaders failed to follow suit?....The postcolonial history of Africa has shown that liberation parties harvest a potent crop of "struggle" legitimacy that generally neutralizes opposition for a generation or so. During that time, the countervailing institutions of the new state tend to wither in their infancy, constitutions are swept aside and the civil service is politicized as lines blur between government and party.
Nelson_Mandela  South_Africa  humility  heroes  inspiration  personality_cults  African  sub-Saharan_Africa  legacies  authoritarianism  loyal_opposition  institutions  institution-building  civil_service  postcolonial 
december 2011 by jerryking
Canada’s most-decorated war hero finally gets his due
MICHAEL POSNER

Last updated Friday, Sep. 23, 2011
Billy Bishop – please, step aside.

Canada’s most celebrated fighter pilot is about to share the podium with
another, much less heralded First World War hero – Lieutenant-Colonel
William G. Barker, VC.

According to the wording on a plaque being unveiled Thursday in
Toronto’s Mount Pleasant Cemetery, it is Mr. Barker, not Mr. Bishop, who
stands as “most decorated war hero in the history of Canada, the
British Empire, and the Commonwealth of Nations.”

“This man was the ace of all the aces,” says Ipsos pollster John Wright.
“He shot down 50 planes, was decorated 12 times for bravery, won the
Victoria Cross while single-handedly fighting off 15 enemy aircraft in
the final aerial battle of the war, and was wounded three times.
WWI  heroes  bravery  pilots  RCAF 
september 2011 by jerryking
The Newest Medal of Honor - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 16, 2010 /Wall Street Journal / By WILLIAM MCGURN.
The Newest Medal of Honor. The man who has earned it is the first from
this war to live to see it.
heroes  inspiration  militaries 
november 2010 by jerryking
Building up everyday heroes - The Globe and Mail
Oct. 1, 2010 | Globe and Mail | Editorial....We need to
overturn our expectations of government, and in its place build a
stronger sense of self-help, community – and country...Governments,
especially governments whose budgets have been severely strained by
stimulus spending in response to the recession, cannot respond to all
the problems Canadians face....What government can do is prepare the
ground for Canadians....For example, governments need to open more
public services to charities and social enterprises...This new culture
of responsibility is not about turning every Canadian into a Kevin
Jacobs, a Jean-François Archambault or a Terry Fox. But it is to adjust
the balance between individuals and the state to encourage individual
initiative and collective enterprise.
DIY  Canada  Canadian  personal_responsibility  public_service  charities  social_enterprise  expectations  heroes  Terry_Fox  self-help  editorials  individual_initiative 
october 2010 by jerryking
Terry Fox and the marathons yet to come
Sep. 20, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Editorial . Terry's run,
a marathon a day for an astounding 143 days, which ended 30 years ago
this month when his cancer returned, offers many practical lessons. The
first lesson is to have a bullheaded belief in oneself. The second
lesson is that seemingly impossible was built on a thousand small
tasks.. The third lesson is to have a purpose larger than oneself. The
fourth lesson is in overcoming pain, or any large obstacle to meeting
one’s goals -- the power of grit, determination and courage. The fifth
lesson is that no foe is too big to fight. The sixth lesson is that
anyone who subscribes to the first five lessons can do it. Terry Fox was
what people sometimes call, clumsily, an ordinary Canadian. He was not
rich; his parents were not famous.
Canadian  cancers  consistency  editorials  grit  heroes  lessons_learned  marathons  overambitious  perseverance  persistence  purpose  self-confidence  small_wins  Terry_Fox 
september 2010 by jerryking
Dorothy Height, Unsung Heroine of Civil Rights Era, Is Dead at 98 - Obituary (Obit) - NYTimes.com
Dorothy Height, Largely Unsung Giant of the Civil Rights Era, Dies at 98
By MARGALIT FOX
Published: April 20, 2010
African-Americans  civil_rights  heroes  obituaries 
april 2010 by jerryking
First the Victoria Cross, now a stamp
Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | by MICHAEL
POSNER. It is probably not widely known that the first Canadian to win
the coveted Victoria Cross - Britain's highest military award, given for
valour in the face of the enemy - was the Nova Scotia son of former
American slaves: William Neilson Edward Hall.

Hall won his decoration - the first ever given either to a Canadian, a
black or a member of the Royal Navy - for bravery shown during the 1857
siege of Lucknow, in India.
African_Canadians  commemoration  inspiration  heroes  awards  Royal_Navy  bravery 
february 2010 by jerryking
"The Hidden River of Knowledge"
May 21, 2007 | New York Times | Commencement address by David Brooks.

In short, things are about to change big time. And one of my messages today is that you know that uncertainty you feel today? It never goes away. The question is, do you know how to make uncertainty your friend?....here's one other thing I've noticed that separates the really great people from the merely famous ones. They talk to dead people.

Merely famous people have pictures of themselves on the wall. Really great people have pictures of dead people on the wall, and on their desks. It's one of the first things I look for when I go into somebody's office...And they talk about these dead people....
The dead were alive to them, and looking over their shoulder....The Greeks used to say we suffer our way to wisdom...Success is not something that we do or that happens to us. Success is something that happens through us....We inherit, starting even before we are born, a great river of knowledge, a great flow from many ages and many sources. The information that comes from millions of years ago, we call brain chemistry. The information that comes from hundreds of thousands of years ago from our hunter and gatherer ancestors we call genes. The information that was handed down thousands of years ago we call religion. The information passed along hundreds of years ago we call culture. The information passed along from decades ago we call family. The information you absorbed over the past few years at Wake Forest we call education....We exist as creatures within this hidden river of knowledge the way a trout exists in a stream or a river. We are formed by the river. It is the medium in which we live and the guide about how to live.

The great people I've seen talking to the dead do so because they want to connect with the highest and most inspiring parts of the river. When people make mistakes, often it is not because they are evil. It's because they don't have an ideal to live up to.

These great people also talk to the dead because they want a voice from outside their selves....the best people I've met don't feel that smart or that special. They have powerful jobs, but they don't feel powerful. They don't feel like architects building these great projects from scratch. They feel instead like river boat captains negotiating the currents around them.

They want to step outside their egotism and understand the river of events. They want to feel how people in the past have negotiated its channels. They want other voices in their heads so they can possess the ultimate power, which is the power of facing unpleasant truths.

Finally, I think they talk to the dead because they want to widen their time horizons....Think hard about who you marry. It's the most important decision you will ever make. Devote yourself to your kids. Nothing else is guaranteed to make you happy. The only thing I'd add is, create a posse of dead people. Create an entourage of heroes. Put their pictures on your wall, and keep them in your mind.

They will remind you of your place in the hidden river of wisdom. They'll serve as models. They'll give you an honest perspective on how you're doing. They'll remind you that your blessings don't come from you but from those who came before you.
advice  affirmations  ancestry  blog  brain_chemistry  career  cognitive_skills  commencement  culture  cultural_transmission  David_Brooks  education  family  genes  Greek  hidden  happiness  heroes  humility  hunter-gatherers  ideas  inspiration  Managing_Your_Career  marriage  perspectives  role_models  sense_of_proportion  speeches  success  suffering  the_counsel_of_the_dead  time_horizons  transcendental  uncertainty  Wake_Forest  wide-framing  wisdom 
november 2009 by jerryking
Those Who Make Us Say 'Oh!' - WSJ.com
* MAY 23, 2009

Those Who Make Us Say 'Oh!'
A tribute to America's war heroes, past and present.
heroes  Peggy_Noonan  tributes  veterans 
may 2009 by jerryking
globeandmail.com: Black is not only beautiful, it's brilliant and heroic
February 14, 2009 G&M book review by JOHN HAREWOOD of A
BLACK STUDIES PRIMER
Heroes and Heroines of the African Diaspora By Keith A. P. Sandiford .
Asks the questions, Why is black history necessary? What topics should
be studied? Who will teach?

Summary
An essential text for students and scholars of black history. Features over 1,000 biographies of historical and contemporary black figures that have made a significant contribution to the development of modern civilisation. It is a celebration of the impact made by black people in areas including politics, engineering, agriculture, entertainment, literature, medicine, sport, philosophy and more. This easy reference encyclopedia has been compiled to fill the gaps in black studies in the school curricula, and will inspire students and teachers alike.
African-Americans  slavery  heroes  heroines  book_reviews  books  curriculum  Diaspora  Africa  primers  blackness  black_pride  black_studies  Black_Is_Beautiful  Negritude  self-identification  history  scholars 
february 2009 by jerryking

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