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jerryking : heterogeneity   15

Amazon offers cautionary tale of AI-assisted hiring
January 23, 2019 | Financial Times | by Andrew Hill.

the task of working out how to get the right people on the bus has got harder since 2001 when Jim Collins first framed it, as it has become clearer — and more research has underlined — that diverse teams are better at innovation. For good reasons of equity and fairness, the quest for greater balance in business has focused on gender, race and background. But these are merely proxies for a more useful measure of difference that is much harder to assess, let alone hire for: cognitive diversity. Might this knotty problem be solved with the help of AI and machine learning? Ming is sceptical. As she points out, most problems with technology are not technology problems, but human problems. Since humans inevitably inherit cultural biases, it is impossible to build an “unbiased AI” for hiring. “You simply have to recognise that the biases exist and put in the effort to do more than those default systems point you towards,” she says...........What Amazon’s experience suggests is that instead of sending bots to crawl over candidates’ past achievements, companies should be exploring ways in which computers can help them to assess and develop the long term potential of the people they invite to board the bus. Recruiters should ask, in Ming’s words, “Who will [these prospective candidates] be three years from now when they’re at their peak productivity inside the company? And that might be a very different story than who will deliver peak productivity the moment they walk in the door.”
heterogeneity  Amazon  artificial_intelligence  hiring  Jim_Collins  machine_learning  recruiting  teams  Vivienne_Ming  cautionary_tales  biases  diversity  intellectual_diversity  algorithms  questions  the_right_people 
january 2019 by jerryking
Ten Ways Ridiculously Successful People Think Differently
December 4, 2017 | LinkedIn | Dr. Travis Bradberry Influencer.

Obstacles do not block the path; they are the path. This perspective helps successful people to think differently to everyone else, which is important, because if you think like everyone else, no matter how smart or experienced you are, you’ll hit the same ceiling. By thinking outside the box and going against the grain, successful people rise above their limitations.

They’re confident.
They’re composed. They know that no matter how good or bad things get, everything changes with time. All they can do is to adapt and adjust to stay happy and in control.

They’re honest.

They seek out small victories.

They’re always learning.

They expose themselves to a variety of people. There’s no easier way to learn to think differently than spending time with someone whose strengths are your weaknesses or whose ideas are radically different from your own. This exposure sparks new ideas and makes you well rounded. This is why we see so many great companies with co-founders who stand in stark contrast to each other. Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak from Apple were a prime example. Neither could have succeeded without the other.

They keep an open mind.

They’re fearless.

They turn tedious tasks into games.

They dream big but remain grounded.
affirmations  thinking_big  gamification  self-confidence  fearlessness  self-control  honesty  Steve_Jobs  heterogeneity  incrementalism  negative_space  open_mind  think_differently  small_wins 
may 2018 by jerryking
Diversity means looking for the knife in a drawerful of spoons
SEPTEMBER 8, 2017 | Financial Times | Tim Harford.

Recruiters and admissions tutors are hoping they made the right choices.

So how do we select the best people for a course or a job? It seems like a sensible question, yet it contains a trap. In selecting the best person we might set a test — in a restaurant kitchen we might ask them to whip up some meals; in a software company we might set some coding problems. And then the trap is sprung.

By setting the same task for every applicant we recruit people who are carbon copies of each other. They will have the same skills and think in the same way. Allowing recruiters some subjective discretion might loosen this trap a little, but it might equally make it worse: we all tend to see merit in applicants who look, speak, and dress much like we do. Opposites do not attract, especially when it comes to corporate hiring.

This is unfair, of course. But it is also — for many but not all tasks — very unwise. Scott Page, a complexity scientist and author of The Diversity Bonus, invites us to think of people as possessing a kind of cognitive toolbox. The tools might be anything from fluent Mandarin to knowing how to dress a turkey to a command of Excel keyboard shortcuts. If the range of skills — the size of the toolkit — matters, then a diverse team will boast more cognitive skills than a homogenous team, even one full of top performers.
admissions  diversity  heterogeneity  hiring  homogeneity  recruiting  selection_processes  teams  Tim_Harford 
november 2017 by jerryking
On campus, it’s good to be bothered by a diversity of ideas - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Sep. 05, 2016

consider the advice U.S. President Barack Obama gave last spring to the graduating class of Howard University, a historically black college in Washington, D.C.

“Don’t try to shut folks out, don’t try to shut them down, no matter how much you might disagree with them,” Mr. Obama said in May. “There will be times when you shouldn’t compromise your core values, your integrity and you will have the responsibility to speak up in the face of injustice. But listen. Engage. If the other side has a point, learn from them. If they’re wrong, rebut them. Teach them. Beat them on the battlefield of ideas. And you might as well start practising now, because one thing I can guarantee you, you will have to deal with ignorance, hatred, racism, foolishness, trifling folks … at every stage of your life.”

Better yet, students should, in Prof. Levinovitz’s words, see university as a “boot camp, not a hotel.” You’re there to toughen up for real life, not shield yourself from its infuriating injustices, painful conflicts and, yes, even the Donald Trumps of this world. Because they’re everywhere.
Konrad_Yakabuski  Colleges_&_Universities  diversity  ideas  intellectual_exploration  political_correctness  censorship  political_orthodoxy  free_speech  hate_speech  safe_spaces  civility  polarization  intellectual_diversity  disagreements  argumentation  heterogeneity  core_values 
september 2016 by jerryking
Corporate sponsors of the arts missing creative opportunities - The Globe and Mail
Jan. 16 2015 | The Globe and Mail | TODD HIRSCH.
...the necessary bridge between creativity and innovation is collaboration – the act of allowing someone else’s experience to change the way you see the world....
It’s time to entirely rethink corporate sponsorship of the arts. Forget the silly logo on the back of the program or the complimentary tickets to the play. What artists can offer is much more valuable: a chance to peer into the mind of a choreographer, a singer, a set designer, a writer. How do they solve complex problems? And what insights can this bring to corporate leaders who are trying to solve problems of their own?

In the end it comes down to something neurologists know very well. If you want to become a creative person, you have to force your brain to see new patterns, unfamiliar terrain and uncomfortable situations. Sitting in a boardroom full of people with the same university degree and the same clothes (think dull blue suits and boring shoes) will do nothing to foster creative, innovative visionaries.

Why don’t artists offer those corporate suits something really valuable? The pitch should be: “Give us $100,000 and we’ll show you how we solve problems and design solutions. You’ll think we’re crazy – and quite possibly we are – but if you allow yourselves the chance, you’ll start to change the way your brain operates. Creativity can’t be taught, but it can be developed.”

Companies can transform the way their leaders think.
Todd_Hirsch  arts  philanthropy  branding  creativity  artists  critical_thinking  skepticism  problem_solving  sponsorships  art  creative_renewal  ideality  collaboration  rethinking  missed_opportunities  heterogeneity  crazy_ideas  radical_ideas  creative_types  neurologists  complex_problems 
january 2015 by jerryking
M.I.T.'s Alex Pentland: Measuring Idea Flows to Accelerate Innovation - NYTimes.com - NYTimes.com
April 15, 2014 | NYT | By STEVE LOHR.

Alex Pentland --“Social Physics: How Good Ideas Spread — The Lesson From a New Science.”

Mr. Pentland has been identified with concepts — and terms he has coined — related to the collection and interpretation of all that data, like “honest signals” and “reality mining.” His descriptive phrases are intended to make his point that not all data in the big data world is equal....Reality mining, for example, examines the data about what people are actually doing rather than what they are looking for or saying. Tracking a person’s movements during the day via smartphone GPS signals and credit-card transactions, he argues, are far more significant than a person’s web-browsing habits or social media comments....Central to the concept of social physics is the ability to measure communication and transactions as never before. Then, that knowledge about the flow of ideas can be used to accelerate the pace of innovation.

The best decision-making environment, Mr. Pentland says, is one with high levels of both “engagement” and “exploration.” Engagement is a measure of how often people in a group communicate with each other, sharing social knowledge. Exploration is a measure of seeking out new ideas and new people.

A golden mean is the ideal....[traders] with a balance of diversity of ideas in their trading network — engagement and exploration — had returns that were 30 percent ahead of isolated traders and well ahead of the echo chamber traders, too....The new data and measurement tools, he writes, allow for a “God’s eye view” of human activity. And with that knowledge, he adds, comes the potential to engineer better decisions in a “data-driven society.”
Alex_Pentland  books  cross-pollination  curiosity  data_scientists  data_driven  decision_making  massive_data_sets  MIT  Mydata  sensors  social_physics  Steve_Lohr  idea_generation  heterogeneity  ideas  intellectual_diversity  traders  social_data  signals  echo_chambers 
april 2014 by jerryking
A Recipe to Enhance Innovation - NYTimes.com
By CHRYSTIA FREELAND
Published: November 15, 2012

it is worth thinking hard about how to make diverse teams effective, and how people who straddle two cultural worlds can succeed....In “Connecting the Dots Within: Creative Performance and Identity Integration,” Chi-Ying Cheng, of Singapore Management University, Jeffrey Sanchez-Burks, of the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan, and Fiona Lee, also at the University of Michigan, argue that ethnic minorities, and women in male-dominated professions, are most creative when they have found a way to believe that their “multiple and conflicting social identities are compatible.”... Their conclusion was that people who have found a way to reconcile their two identities — Asian-Americans, for example, or women who work in male-dominated jobs like engineering — are the best at finding creative solutions to problems..... In other words, if the world around us tells us our dual identities are compatible, we will believe that, and act accordingly. If female engineers work in a company that treats their gender as a virtue, they will do better. If Asian-Americans live in a community that celebrates both aspects of their identity, they will be more effective.

America’s rainbow coalition won at the ballot box this month, but in other settings, the nation has become a little weary of diversity-cheering movements like multiculturalism and even explicit feminism. Dr. Cheng’s work suggests that cynicism may be misplaced. Diversity can work, but we have to work at it.
Chrystia_Freeland  demographic_changes  ethnic_communities  diversity  cross-cultural  books  teams  innovation  connecting_the_dots  dual-consciousness  heterogeneity 
december 2012 by jerryking
How outsiders solve problems that stump experts
May. 02, 2012 | The Globe and Mail| by ERIN MILLAR Special to Globe and Mail Update.

“Radical innovations often happen at the intersections of disciplines,” write Dr. Karim Lakhani and Dr. Lars Bo Jeppesen, of Harvard Business School and Copenhagen Business School respectively, in the Harvard Business Review. “The more diverse the problem-solving population, the more likely a problem is to be solved. People tend to link problems that are distant from their fields with solutions that they've encountered in their own work.”....“We assume that technical problems can be solved only by people with technical expertise,” writes Jonah Lehrer, who discusses InnoCentive in his new book Imagine: How Creativity Works. “But that assumption is wrong. The people deep inside a domain – the chemists trying to solve a chemistry problem – often suffer from a type of intellectual handicap. It's not until the challenge is shared with motivated outsiders that the solution can be found.
creativity  heterogeneity  innovation  polymaths  problem_solving  InnoCentive  books  Jonah_Lehrer  cross-pollination  interdisciplinary  outsiders  intellectual_diversity  moonshots  breakthroughs  industry_expertise 
may 2012 by jerryking
How to Build Your Network
December 2005 | HBR | Brian Uzzi and Shannon Dunlap.

Strong personal networks don't just happen at the watercooler. They have to be carefully constructed.Networks offer three unique advantages: private information, access to different skills and power. Leaders see the benefits of working every day, but perhaps not pause to examine how their networks are governed....Here's how to strengthen your connections.

Paul Revere was an information broker, a person who occupies a key role in a social network by connecting disparate groups of people....Networks determine which ideas become breakthroughs, which new drugs are prescribed, which farmers cultivate pest-resistant crops, and which R&D engineers makes the most high impact discoveries....When we make judgments, we use both public and private information. These days, public information is readily available from various sources, including the Internet, but precisely because it is so accessible, public information provides a competitive advantage much less than usual. Privacy, however, gathered from personal contacts that can offer something unique that can not be found in public spaces such as the release of a new product, the novel software code, or knowledge of this what a particular investigator seeks in candidates. Private information, therefore, may provide an advantage for executives, but is more subjective than public information, because it usually is not marked by an independent third party, such as Dun & Bradstreet. Therefore, the value of your private information to others and the value of your private information depends on how much confidence exists in the network of relationships....the best way to have a good idea is to have a lot of ideas....And when you trade information or skills with people whose experiences differ from your own, you provide one another with unique, exceptionally valuable resources....Power was repositioned in the network's information brokers, who could adapt to changes in the organization, develop clients, and synthesize opposing points of view.
These brokers weren't necessarily at the top of the hierarchy or experts in the field, but they linked specialists in the firm with trustworthy and informative ties.
networking  social_networking  social_capital  HBR  howto  networks  nonpublic  confidence  slight_edge  proprietary  relationships  exclusivity  public_information  private_information  inequality_of_information  homogeneity  heterogeneity  dual-consciousness  power_brokers  network_power  personal_chemistry  personal_connections  judgment  prolificacy  subjectivity  information_brokers  intentionality 
march 2012 by jerryking
Canadians are living in an age of deep diversity -
Oct. 14, 2011 | The Globe and Mail | Editorials

A new survey shows, however, that visible minorities are a very heterogeneous group, and that other demographic markers – such as religion and class – can more accurately predict discrimination and other barriers that certain groups face.

The poll of 2,345 Canadians found that Muslims are viewed in a predominantly unfavourable light. Only 43 per cent of Canadians hold a positive view of Muslims. In contrast, three-quarters view blacks, Hispanics and Chinese positively, and 61 per cent view aboriginals positively. Sixty per cent of respondents also viewed relations between the upper and lower classes negatively.
diversity  Canadian  editorials  visible_minorities  heterogeneity 
october 2011 by jerryking
America's Edge: Power in the Networked Century
Jan/Feb 2009 | Foreign Affairs | Anne-Marie Slaughter. The
power that flows from networked connectivity is not the power to impose
outcomes. Netwks are not directed & controlled as much as they are
managed & orchestrated. Multiple players are integrated into a whole
greater than the sum of its parts--an orchestra that plays differently
according to the vision of its conductor & talent of individual
musicians. ...Most important, netwk. power flows from the ability to
make the maximum number of valuable connections. The next requirement is
to have the knowledge & skills to harness that power to achieve a
common purpose.... If, in a networked world, measure of a state's power
is its ability to turn connectivity into innovation and growth... Thanks
to demography, geography, and culture, the 21st century looks
increasingly like an “Americas” century.
ProQuest  globalization  immigrants  21st._century  networks  network_power  heterogeneity  Communicating_&_Connecting  power  influence  orchestration  Anne-Marie_Slaughter 
january 2011 by jerryking

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