recentpopularlog in

jerryking : high-growth   28

Scaling Success Lazaridis Institute Whitepaper
March 2016

Building a prosperous Canadian knowledge-economy depends in no small part on the creation of
a next generation of high-growth, globally competitive Canadian technology companies. These
high-growth companies contribute disproportionately to the creation of employment and economic
growth. However, compared to other mature economies, Canada has so far underperformed on the
creation of these firms.
As part of the development of the Lazaridis Institute at Wilfrid Laurier University, this white paper
is designed to shed light on the relative scarcity of high-growth Canadian technology firms. We
began by asking 125 of Canada’s most well-informed and best-placed industry stakeholders—in
particular the founders of, and investors in, high-growth technology firms—to talk about the major
impediments facing these firms. Their comments indicated a significant knowledge gap related
to the role management and executive skills play among these growth challenges. Their feedback
also demonstrated a shared understanding that scaling a technology company in today’s global
marketplace is radically different than in previous eras.
The analysis of this data reveals the following key findings:
• While science, technology, engineering and mathematics-related (STEM) talent is
abundant, the talent pool in general lacks business and management knowledge.
• Shortages of experienced management and/or executive talent are the primary inhibitors
to scaling up.
• Canadian technology firms lack key management competencies in specific areas including
sales, marketing, organizational design and product management.
• The talent shortage is linked to the lack of existing and/or exited growth firms in
Canada’s technology sector.
These findings underscore the importance of building a well-rounded cadre of managers and
executives in Canada’s technology sector. Doing so must take into consideration the fact that
today’s technology markets are distinguished by far shorter time-to-market and product life cycles,
as well as a generally more complex global operating environment.
This white paper presents an in-depth review of the challenges facing Canadian high-tech firms and
develops a strong evidence base upon which to build future initiatives designed to address them.
The work represents an important first step by the Lazaridis Institute to help a next generation of
Canadian technology companies scale into global leaders.
Canada  Canadian  gazelles  high-growth  investors  scaling  start_ups  talent  technology  Colleges_&_Universities  Kitchener-Waterloo  knowledge_economy  WLU  Mike_Lazaridis  team_risk 
11 weeks ago by jerryking
Silicon Valley Myths Aside, Time Is on the Side of Aging Entrepreneurs - CIO Journal. - WSJ
By Irving Wladawsky-Berger
Aug 31, 2018

Are young entrepreneurs more likely to produce high-growth firms? Can middle-age founders in their 40s be successful?

Age and High-Growth Entrepreneurship, — a recent working paper by economists Pierre Azoulay, Benjamin Jones, J. Daniel Kim and Javier Miranda — aimed to answer these questions.
aging  ageism  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  high-growth  Irving_Wladawsky-Berger  midlife  myths  Silicon_Valley  founders 
september 2018 by jerryking
Benevolent Bacon? Nestle And Unilever Gobble Up Niche Brands - WSJ
By Saabira Chaudhuri
Sept. 7, 2017

The global packaged-food industry is facing fierce competition from a burgeoning number of small, but high-growth food and beverage brands. These brands have struck a chord with consumers looking for locally produced or more healthy, natural choices.

Amid this shift, sales from traditional players have flagged, spurring consolidation, cost cutting and restructuring.

Unilever fended off an unsolicited takeover by Kraft Heinz Co. earlier this year. Activist investor Dan Loeb’s Third Point hedge fund in June disclosed a major stake in Nestlé, calling for changes in strategy to improve shareholder returns. In response, the two consumer-goods firms have focused on cost cutting and promises to boost dividends, while going on the hunt for nimbler food and beverage brands with the potential to accelerate growth.

‘We’re experiencing a consumer shift toward plant-based proteins.’
—Nestlé USA Chief Executive Paul Grimwood
Nestlé’s deal to buy Sweet Earth comes less than three months after it bought a stake in subscription-meals company Freshly, which sells healthy, prepared meals to consumers across the U.S.

Moss Landing, Calif.-based Sweet Earth bills itself as a natural, ethical, environmentally conscious company that substitutes plant proteins for animal ones in meals like curries, stir fries, breakfast wraps, burgers and pasta. Founded in 2011, Sweet Earth is available in more than 10,000 stores in the U.S. It is stocked at independent natural grocers, as well as bigger chains like Amazon.com Inc.’s Whole Foods, Target Corp. , Kroger Co. and Wal-Mart Stores Inc.

“We’re experiencing a consumer shift toward plant-based proteins,” said Paul Grimwood, chief executive of Nestlé’s U.S. arm. Plant-based food, as a sector, is growing at double-digit percentages rates, Nestlé said.
Big_Food  brands  CPG  emotional_connections  Unilever  niches  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  Nestlé  shifting_tastes  start_ups  large_companies  Fortune_500  plant-based  healthy_lifestyles  high-growth  gazelles 
september 2017 by jerryking
Digital endurance runner picks up pace with Penguin deal
July 15/16, 2017 | Financial Times | Guy Chazan

Bertelsmann's latest big investment, in Penguin Randon House (PRH), a traditional ink-on-paper publisher. .The German group, which already owns 53% of PRH, will pay $780m to buy an additional 22% from its partner, Pearson......The deal seems at odds with Bertelsmann's digital-first strategy. Rabe sees no contradiction....Bertelsmann must maintain a balance between high-growth investments and stable, cash-generative businesses like PRH....It margins are high,[and it] contributes to the cash flows Bertelsmann needs to invest in new businesses with higher growth potential than book publishing.....Mr. Rabe has responded by diversifying Bertelsmann out of Europe, investing in digital start-ups in China, India and Brazil and branching into online education in the US. The bright digital-first future is still far off. But Rabe , an endurance runner, relishes a long and winding road.
CEOs  digital_media  Bertelsmann  online_education  high-growth  Pearson  publishing  digital_first  cash-generative  cash_flows  privately_held_companies  Germany  German  cash_cows 
july 2017 by jerryking
Inside the mind of a venture capitalist | McKinsey & Company
August 2016 | McK | Steve Jurvetson is a partner at Draper Fisher Jurvetson. Michael Chui,
(1) entrepreneurs who have infectious enthusiasm.
(2) sector of the economy believed to be experiencing rapid growth/ massive disruptive change.
(3) wide range of industries, from synthetic biology to rockets to electric cars to a variety of sectors that weren’t ripe for venture investment in prior decades but now are becoming software businesses.
(4) attributes and people somewhat similar to what I look for in the team at work: enough self-confidence to be humble about what it’s proposing and respect for the team over individuals
How should large companies respond? The large companies that are most exciting to me are the ones that innovate outside their core. big companies need to innovate outside their core businesses. The biggest start-up: Space.
Steve_Jurvetson  McKinsey  DFJ  venture_capital  vc  disruption  space  large_companies  software  core_businesses  Moore's_Law  machine_learning  passions  Elon_Musk  accelerated_lifecycles  space_travel  innovation  self-confidence  high-growth  humility  teams 
august 2016 by jerryking
Laurier initiative to separate the strong startups from the weak - The Globe and Mail
JENNIFER LEWINGTON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jul. 08, 2016

[For Corey & UpSpark]
Earlier this year, the school’s Lazaridis Institute for the Management of Technology Enterprises issued a report, Scaling Success: Tackling the Management Gap in Canada’s Technology Sector, that concluded Canada “continues to underperform its peers in the creation of high-growth firms.” For example, a majority of tech startups in the professional, scientific and technical sector demonstrated “consistently negative rates of business creation” between 2001 and 2012, according to the report.

Given the poor showing, the dean asks: “So how do we take our most promising startups and take them to the next level?”

One answer, he hopes, is a new collaboration between the Lazaridis Institute and several tech-focused industry partners.

Working with Communitech, a Waterloo-based innovation centre that supports more than 1,000 technology companies, the Institute plans to develop an assessment tool this fall to identify startups with the potential to scale up. The tool, currently being tested, would evaluate companies for the quality of their product, technology, staff, management and financial muscle.
assessments_&_evaluations  brands  business_schools  Colleges_&_Universities  Communitech  culling  failure  Fortune_500  gazelles  high-growth  Kitchener-Waterloo  large_companies  scaling  start_ups  tools  under-performing  WLU 
july 2016 by jerryking
Blitzscaling
ENTREPRENEURSHIP
Blitzscaling
Tim Sullivan

FROM THE APRIL 2016 ISSUE

Let’s start with the basics. What is blitzscaling?
Hoffman: Blitzscaling is what you do when you need to grow really, really quickly. It’s the science and art of rapidly building out a company to serve a large and usually global market, with the goal of becoming the first mover at scale.

This is high-impact entrepreneurship. These kinds of companies always create a lot of the jobs and industries of the future. For example, Amazon essentially invented e-commerce. Today, it has over 150,000 employees and has created countless jobs at Amazon sellers and partners. Google revolutionized how we find information—it has over 60,000 employees and has created many more jobs at its AdWords and AdSense partners.

Why this focus on fast growth?
We’re in a networked age. And I don’t mean only the internet. Globalization is a form of network. It adds networks of transport, commerce, payment, and information flows around the world. In such an environment, you have to move faster, because competition from anywhere on the globe may beat you to scale.

Software has a natural affinity with blitzscaling, because the marginal costs of serving any size market are virtually zero. The more that software becomes integral to all industries, the faster things will move. Throw in AI machine learning, and the loops get even faster. So we’re going to see more blitzscaling. Not just a little more, but a lot more.
blitzscaling  economies_of_scale  scaling  HBR  high-growth  high-impact  Silicon_Valley  LinkedIn  Reid_Hoffman  networks  first_movers  large_markets  market_sizing  accelerated_lifecycles 
may 2016 by jerryking
Canada must fill three gaps to reach its high-growth future - The Globe and Mail
VICTOR DODIG
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Nov. 27, 2015

While Canada is roundly – and rightly – envied for its solid economy and how it withstood the financial crisis, we have three gaps to fill if we are going to continue to prosper and be leaders among the advanced economies.

First, I believe we need to do a better job of building the intellectual capital and skills necessary to fuel innovation and execute in a modern economy.

Second, we need to ensure our innovative entrepreneurs are able to attract both the formation and sustainability capital necessary to commercialize new ideas into valuable products and services.

Third, we need to ensure that we build an innovative ecosystem that effectively encourages and nurtures that development......Actually, some troubling issues lie behind those positive numbers:

* We have a much lower proportion of graduates in the all-important STEM sectors – science, technology, engineering and mathematics – than 22 other OECD countries.
* Only about 20 per cent of our graduates are from those disciplines.
* Postsecondary graduates rank 19th of 21 in numeracy, 18th of 21 in literacy and 14th of 18 in problem-solving skills.

We’re talking about the very people and very skills we need to need to lead Canada in innovation and create the high-value jobs for the future.

In effect, a postsecondary education is simply not enough in today’s modern economy. Our students, by and large, are choosing an educational path geared toward acquiring credentials rather than skills acquisition and what the labour market needs.

So, what do we need to do?....
(1) promote education choices that match the needs of the job market.
(2) promote policies and models to support emerging industries that focus on creating solutions in the global supply chain as opposed to just building products.

Canadians are no strangers to discovery and innovation, but today’s innovation ecosystem is highly complex. Far too many Canadian high-tech startups get bought out before they have a chance to grow. They often sell out before attaining their true potential.

When small and mid-sized startups are sold, the country is weaker for it.

Why? Because the really smart innovators never stop. After a successful sale, many are back the next day looking for the next opportunity and dreaming of the next big discovery. And retaining highly paid head-office jobs in Canada rather than seeing them farmed out elsewhere will help spread those benefits to the broader economy.
Canada  Canadian  future  CIBC  CEOs  high-growth  innovation  innovation_policies  policy  labour_markets  start_ups  sellout_culture  STEM  intellectual_capital  think_threes  smart_people  overambitious  policymaking  head_offices  ecosystems  digital_economy  Victor_Dodig 
may 2016 by jerryking
Hunting the gazelle
DECEMBER 7, 2007 | The Globe and Mail | by SEAN WISE.

If one is attempting to build relationships with fast growing companies, how does one decide which ones (of the thousands of small companies starting out) will become big companies - big enough to justify the cost of investing in them now?.......in an effort to ensure a shared nomenclature, here's a communal taxonomy to help classify the various types of ventures encountered.

• Mice are small companies that are likely to stay small. Think "Bob's Pizza"- they can serve a great slice of 'za but it is unlikely they will double in size annually.

• Elephants are large companies whose growth is constant, but at a low level. Think Royal Bank. Its revenues grow annually, but it is so large that the growth is negligible over the short term, yet noticeable over the long term. Unfortunately, these companies have a high client acquisition cost.

• Dogs are medium to large companies that are experiencing low or negative growth. Think "AOL". A great company, but its revenue is shrinking. In the venture capital business, I often refer to these companies as kennel capital, i.e., companies that should be put to sleep.

• Gazelles are young companies that are experiencing extreme, massive growth. For those that pitch them early, the CAC is low and carries with it a high return on investment. Think "Facebook".

From a cash flow perspective, all four business animals start at similar points, however, they diverge rather quickly. The green Mouse stays fairly consistent, growing and shrinking its cash flow over time - possibly as a result of seasonal conditions. Never is it losing money, but it's never really hitting it big, either. The yellow Elephant starts in the best cash flow position and grows consistently at a relatively reasonable CAGR (Compounded Annual Growth Rate - a common business term used to represent the annualized growth of the business). Backing an elephant is never a bad idea, it is in fact, the safest bet (no one ever got fired from trying to land an Elephant). Unfortunately, Elephants are hunted by all, and this in turn, drives up the customer acquisition cost (CAC).......The Gazelles are where it's at from a business development (aka hunting) perspective. Gazelles tend to have the highest CAGR. They're also non-bureaucratic, and are flat in their organizational chart, which contributes to shorter sales cycles and lower CAC.

How to pick a Gazelle?
(1) Focus on those in industries with CAGR > 25%. If an industry is growing annually by 25% or more, then even those companies who finish second or third in their niche will do well. After all, a rising tide floats all boats.

(2) Look for Scalability. If a company can scale, it means they can produce their products for ever-increasing margins (i.e., the 1000th widget costs less to make than the 10th).

(3) Focus on Sustainable Competitive Advantage. If the company you are reviewing lacks any sort of proprietary intellectual property (i.e., patents), or has no barrier to entry, how will they stop others from flooding the market and eating their lunch? Gazelles continue to grow faster than their competitors by being able to differentiate their offerings to their clients.

(4) Look for the 10x rule. Being a little better, a little faster; or a little cheaper isn't enough to turn a startup into a Gazelle. For that to happen, a company has to offer a solution that is 10x faster, 10x better, 10x more secure, 10x cheaper, etc. To sustain double digit growth over the long term, and/or to obtain dominant market position, you will need a 10x solution, a solution that is exponentially better.

The Bottom Line

Whether you are a startup, an angel investor looking to back the best startups, or a service provider looking to serve either, you need to be able to spot high growth companies earlier than others. You need to be able to separate the wheat from the chaff - the potential world leaders from those that will become kennel capital.

If you are looking to find the next Google, Facebook, or Workbrain, you need to strap on your pith helmet and start tracking the Gazelles. Doing so will most likely ensure the greatest returns on your efforts,
10x  barriers_to_entry  business_development  CAGR  cash_flows  competitive_advantage  culling  customer_acquisition  gazelles  high-growth  howto  return_on_effort  scaling  small_business  start_ups  taxonomy 
february 2015 by jerryking
Michael Hyatt lays out your plan for success - Western Alumni
May 6, 2014 | Alumni Gazette|by Jason Winders, MES'10.

Shut Up and Listen

No Guarantees
Just because you have a great product, doesn’t mean you are going to make any money.

Play in a Big Sandbox
Go into a big and growing market. When you go into a big and growing market, you can probably get a slice of it – even if you are incompetent. You need a big and growing market, great people and a great product – in that order. Having a great product in a small and shrinking market with OK people, you will always make no money.

Embrace Discomfort
Discomfort, pain and sacrifice actually make the entrepreneurs. Being uncomfortable, being lonely, being misunderstood, everybody looks at the great entrepreneurs and don’t realize the struggle.

Trust No One
Your friends and family, everybody, they will tell you what you have is amazing and you’re so great and, when you bring that product out next year, they are going to buy it. It’s not true. People are trained to give niceties. Go ask all your friends and family for $10,000 to invest in your start-up, then you will find out right away what their problems are.

The Hard Truth
The ride doesn’t necessarily have any good payout....You are not always going to get what you want.

Personal Plan
Live below your means, not at your means. Invest the difference to become wealthy.

Don't Ignore the Basics
(diet, sleep and exercise).
UWO  entrepreneur  alumni  rules_of_the_game  high-growth  frugality  Michael_Hyatt  large_markets  discomforts  personal_cost  personal_sacrifice  hard_truths  personal_enrichment 
may 2014 by jerryking
Emerging Investors in Africa: Africans - WSJ.com
July 5, 2012 | WSJ | By PATRICK MCGROARTY
Emerging Investors in Africa: Africans
As U.S. and Europe Scale Back Amid Global Crisis, Intra-Continent Investments Are on the Rise.

Even as overall foreign investment into Africa has contracted, a cohort of homegrown companies has mounted an unprecedented expansion drive. Investment between African countries has almost doubled in the past five years, to 13% of new projects started on the continent last year, according to a report on foreign direct investment released Thursday by the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.

African companies are heading into the rest of Africa in an unprecedented investment drive that has cushioned a pullback from the West and signaled the emergence of homegrown multinationals.

The companies behind those investments are chasing high growth rates in fast-developing markets, many of them buoyed by resource exports. Oil in Angola and Nigeria, copper in Zambia and coal in Mozambique have each attracted tens of billions of dollars over the past decade. Over the period, the continent's supermarket chains, construction companies and banks have expanded rapidly.
Africa  FDI  South-South  commodities  South_Africa  Nigeria  pullbacks  investors  high-growth 
july 2012 by jerryking
The search for dark secrets - FT.com
November 28, 2005 | Financial Times | By Jeremy Grant

With the premium end of the US chocolate market growing at an annual compound rate of 15 per cent compared with 3 to 4 per cent for standard chocolate, Mars believes there is scope to sell high-quality chocolates in a café setting to a target group of relatively affluent people aged from 25 to 39.

Focus group work, and the number of young mothers visiting the Chicago stores with prams and strollers, tells Mars that most will be women. It is perhaps no coincidence that the name Ethel – that of the wife of Mars company founder and inventor of the Milky Way, Frank Mars – was chosen.
CAGR  cafés  chocolate  confectionery_industry  CPG  experimentation  gourmands  gourmet  high-end  high-growth  high-quality  market_research  Mars  niches  retailers  Starbucks  upscale  women 
july 2012 by jerryking
Don Valentine, Venture Capitalist - Forbes
12/09/2005 @ 10:59AM |149 views
Don Valentine, Venture Capitalist
Rich Karlgaard Rich Karlgaard,

Most VCs say they invest, first and foremost, in people. Technology and markets are secondary considerations. The thinking goes: “A” people will know how to find “A” technology and “A” markets.

Valentine rejects that. He bets on markets that are ready to explode. Deep in his salesman’s bones, Valentine knew the market for microcomputers (Apple), databases (Oracle) and routers (Cisco) would go nuclear before other investors did.
Don_Valentine  Rich_Karlgaard  Sequoia  large_markets  teams  high-growth 
june 2012 by jerryking
Boosting Emerging-Market Entrepreneurs
May 23, 2007 | Bloomberg BusinessWeek | by Jeffrey Gangemi.
A non-profit is offering small, high-growth companies know-how, connections, and encouragement to think big. Revenues are growing
emerging_markets  Endeavor  entrepreneur  gazelles  high-growth  nonprofit  thinking_big 
june 2012 by jerryking
Sales Spurt, Growing Pains Leave Karaoke Maker Singing the Blues - WSJ.com
July 29, 2003 | WSJ | By JEFF BAILEY - Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL.

Singing Machine Co., a Coconut Creek, Fla., maker of karaoke machines. But rather than celebrating its success, these days the executives at Singing Machine are scrambling to avoid insolvency. The company's experience is a warning to all entrepreneurs about the dangers of rapid growth. Outside auditors last month noted that a default on a borrowing agreement "raises substantial doubt about the company's ability to continue as a going concern."

"It's a classic business-school case of growing pains," says Y.P. Chan, 39 years old and recently named Singing Machine's chief operating officer.

Every year, thousands of smaller companies go belly up because entrepreneurs aren't prepared to manage rapid growth. Accustomed to scratching for every sale, when the throttle is finally thrown wide open, too many assume it is clear sailing and fail to ask some important questions.
[chart]

Are your finances solid enough to support a bigger company, or are you counting on lush profits to do it? If you load up on inventory to satisfy demand, how will you survive if prices plunge? Look around -- does management have experience running a bigger enterprise? Look at your competitors -- are they bigger and likely to weather tough times better? Or are they also small companies that might get overextended and slash prices to stay afloat?
small_business  growth  bankruptcies  warning_signs  insolvency  contingency_planning  hard_times  high-growth  inventories  risk-management  overextended 
may 2012 by jerryking
Building Wealth - 99.06
J U N E 1 9 9 9 |The Atlantic | by Lester C. Thurow. The new rules for individuals, companies, and nations.

Rule 1 No one ever becomes very rich by saving money.
Rule 2 Sometimes successful businesses have to cannibalize themselves to save themselves.
Rule 3 Two routes other than radical technological change can lead to high-growth, high-rate-of-return opportunities: sociological disequilibriums and developmental disequilibriums.
Rule 4 Making capitalism work in a deflationary environment is much harder than making it work in an inflationary environment.
Rule 5 There are no institutional substitutes for individual entrepreneurial change agents.
Rule 6 No society that values order above all else will be creative; but without some degree of order (institutional integrity??), creativity disappears.
Rule 7 A successful knowledge-based economy requires large public investments in education, infrastructure, and research and development.
Rule 8 The biggest unknown for the individual in a knowledge-based economy is how to have a career in a system where there are no careers.
Lester_Thurow  wealth_creation  entrepreneurship  rules_of_the_game  deflation  career_paths  Managing_Your_Career  cannibalization  disequilibriums  anomalies  JCK  unknowns  high-growth  change_agents  individual_initiative  technological_change  digital_economy  messiness  constraints  knowledge_economy  public_education  new_rules  capitalism  personal_enrichment  ROI  institutional_integrity 
november 2011 by jerryking
Marc Andreessen on Why Software Is Eating the World - WSJ.com
My own theory is that we are in the middle of a dramatic and broad technological and economic shift in which software companies are poised to take over large swathes of the economy.

More and more major businesses and industries are being run on software and delivered as online services—from movies to agriculture to national defense......Software is also eating much of the value chain of industries that are widely viewed as primarily existing in the physical world. In today's cars, software runs the engines, controls safety features, entertains passengers, guides drivers to destinations and connects each car to mobile, satellite and GPS networks. The days when a car aficionado could repair his or her own car are long past, due primarily to the high software content. The trend toward hybrid and electric vehicles will only accelerate the software shift—electric cars are completely computer controlled. And the creation of software-powered driverless cars is already under way at Google and the major car companies.....Companies in every industry need to assume that a software revolution is coming. This includes even industries that are software-based today. Great incumbent software companies like Oracle and Microsoft are increasingly threatened with irrelevance by new software offerings like Salesforce.com and Android (especially in a world where Google owns a major handset maker).

In some industries, particularly those with a heavy real-world component such as oil and gas, the software revolution is primarily an opportunity for incumbents. But in many industries, new software ideas will result in the rise of new Silicon Valley-style start-ups that invade existing industries with impunity. Over the next 10 years, the battles between incumbents and software-powered insurgents will be epic. [the great game] Joseph Schumpeter, the economist who coined the term "creative destruction," would be proud.....Finally, the new companies need to prove their worth. They need to build strong cultures, delight their customers, establish their own competitive advantages and, yes, justify their rising valuations. No one should expect building a new high-growth, software-powered company in an established industry to be easy. It's brutally difficult.
Marc_Andreessen  Andreessen_Horowitz  software  physical_economy  creative_destruction  Joseph_Schumpeter  software_is_eating_the_world  delighting_customers  physical_world  high-growth  Silicon_Valley  competitive_advantage  incumbents  the_great_game  electric_cars  cyberphysical 
august 2011 by jerryking
The secret to controlled chaos - FT.com
June 20, 2011 By Tim Bradshaw . Stratospheric growth can
prove problematic... Your site may go down all the time.”... As
broadband access spreads and smartphones become mainstream in developed
markets, new technology companies are being built in months, not years,
acquiring millions of users with apparent ease...For small companies
thrust un­expectedly into the limelight, coping with such growth rates,
while maintaining the innovation and culture that brought them their
success, can be a significant challenge..Although internal culture is
important, companies must not become too inward-looking as they try to
manage growth and should be vigilant of the impact that the changes to
their business is having on customers. “The key element is to eliminate
surprises,” , “Growth is great but it must be measured. In fast times,
it’s metrics, metrics, metrics. You must measure where traffic comes
from, what the customers are doing...with that you can then focus on
serving your best customers.”
growth  start_ups  chaos  hiring  recruiting  growth_hacking  metrics  inward-looking  mojo  measurements  organizational_culture  scaling  accelerated_lifecycles  surprises  small_business  gazelles  high-growth 
june 2011 by jerryking
EBay Adds 'Flash' Fashion - WSJ.com
MARCH 29, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By GEOFFREY A. FOWLER
And RAY A. SMITH. EBay Adds 'Flash' Fashion
Business Model Takes a Page From Online Sample Sales. EBay Inc. will
launch "flash sales" of high-end fashion brands Monday in its latest bid
to revive its giant online marketplace. On a portion of its Web site
dubbed Fashion Vault, the company will offer discounts starting at 50%
off retail for a limited time, beginning with offerings from French
Connection Group PLC.
The business model, which follows a trial in the fall featuring Hugo
Boss, DKNY and Max Mara, takes a page from such Web sites as Gilt Groupe
Inc. and GSI Commerce Inc.'s Rue La La. Those sites have carved out a
fast-growing niche in e-commerce by offering the online equivalent of
one-off sample sales. The move is a departure for eBay, which has
generally billed itself as a neutral third-party marketplace that anyone
can join.
apparel  brands  EBay  e-commerce  fashion  flash_sales  high-end  high-growth  microsites  niches  one-of-a-kind  product_launches  Ray_Smith 
march 2010 by jerryking
The Ultimate Start-Up Challenge? Hyper Growth - WSJ.com
MARCH 10, 2010 | Wall street Journal | By TERI EVANS. Fast
growth is often an entrepreneur's dream, but it can come with
repercussions, including customer-service snafus and staffing chaos. If
not managed well, it can also wreck a company culture, which can put a
young company in "serious danger," according to Rob Wolcott, a professor
of entrepreneurship and innovation at the Kellogg School of Management.

"In many ways, culture is the one thing that gives you long-term
competitive advantage because it's something that is very difficult to
copy," .[perhaps see Paul Graham on doing things that don't scale] Mr. Wolcott says. "When growth becomes too hot to handle, so to speak, then everyone starts focusing on the urgent and sometimes misses the important."
growth  start_ups  challenges  size  scaling  organizational_culture  revenge_effects  competitive_advantage  uniqueness  customer_service  repercussions  staffing  chaos  high-growth  unscalability 
march 2010 by jerryking
The Internet Report
February 1996 | Morgan Stanley U.S. Investment Research pg. 41 |
by assorted writers. When looking for investment ideas in new markets,
we default to our favorite maxims from Don Valentine of Sequoia Capital,
who is known as one of the toughest and smartest technology venture
capitalists in Silicon Valley. Don follows several simple rules in
choosing early-stage tech investments: (1) Find “monster” markets that
can be really big, like the Internet; (2) find good technology and good
technologists who can stay ahead of competitive threats; (3) find
outstanding leaders/management teams that can drive the technologies and
markets forward; and 4) buy companies, not products, and try to find
companies that have achieved critical mass with their products — or can
achieve it, and can create some form of “barriers to entry.”
barriers_to_entry  buying_a_business  critical_mass  Don_Valentine  engineering  good_enough  high-growth  investors  large_markets  leaders  Mary_Meeker  Morgan_Stanley  rules_of_the_game  Sequoia  teams  technology  vc  venture_capital  filetype:pdf  media:document 
february 2010 by jerryking
Divided We Stand: Smart firms expand in pieces, spinning fast-growth units into standalone entities
Mar 2005 | Inc. Vol. 27, Iss. 3; pg. 59, 2 pgs | by David H
Freedman. "Technology is working its way into an ever wider array of
products, frequently reinventing them, and the Internet has made word of
mouth nearly instantaneous. The result: an increasingly unpredictable
landscape of "instant markets" that requires new levels of speed and
agility. High-tech companies have a way of coping. The basic idea is
deceptively simple: Instead of thinking in terms of expanding the
company as a whole, focus on new, fast-growth, "spin-up" business units
with their own identities - even if it means letting other parts of the
company languish."
growth  spinups  fractals  innovation  Apple  speed  agility  windows_of_opportunity  David_Freedman  spin-offs  new_categories  pop-ups  standalone  high-growth 
october 2009 by jerryking
Best career advancement: Bottoms up
Jul 1993 | Inc. Vol. 15, Iss. 7; pg. 58, 2 pgs| Anonymous.
Nowhere are the opportunities for advancement as dramatic as in
fast-growing companies. "There's no ladder to climb," says Jon Goodman,
director of the Entrepreneur Program at the University of Southern
California in Los Angeles. "They're building the ladder as they grow."
So the challenge is to hire the kinds of employees that will help build
the ladder. "You don't want to advance--you want to enlarge," adds
Goodman. "Your technical skills become greater; you build your resume in
terms of span of control and responsibility."
Freshbooks  organizational_culture  hiring  career  Managing_Your_Career  Employer_of_Choice  span_of_control  responsibility  gazelles  growth  high-growth 
september 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read