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jerryking : home_automation   6

Your Roomba May Be Mapping Your Home, Collecting Data That Could Be Sold
JULY 25, 2017 | The New York Times | By MAGGIE ASTOR.

High-end models of Roomba, iRobot’s robotic vacuum, collect data as they clean, identifying the locations of your walls and furniture. This helps them avoid crashing into your couch, but it also creates a map of your home that iRobot is considering selling to Amazon, Apple or Google.

Colin Angle, chief executive of iRobot, told Reuters that a deal could come in the next two years, though iRobot said in a statement on Tuesday: “We have not formed any plans to sell data.”

In the hands of a company like Amazon, Apple or Google, that data could fuel new “smart” home products.

“When we think about ‘what is supposed to happen’ when I enter a room, everything depends on the room at a foundational level knowing what is in it,” an iRobot spokesman said in a written response to questions. “In order to ‘do the right thing’ when you say ‘turn on the lights,’ the room must know what lights it has to turn on. Same thing for music, TV, heat, blinds, the stove, coffee machines, fans, gaming consoles, smart picture frames or robot pets.”

But the data, if sold, could also be a windfall for marketers, and the implications are easy to imagine. No armchair in your living room? You might see ads for armchairs next time you open Facebook. Did your Roomba detect signs of a baby? Advertisers might target you accordingly.... iRobot said that it was “committed to the absolute privacy of our customer-related data.” Consumers can use a Roomba without connecting it to the internet, or “opt out of sending map data to the cloud through a switch in the mobile app.”

“No data is sold to third parties,” the statement added. “No data will be shared with third parties without the informed consent of our customers.”
data  mapping  privacy  location_based_services  LBMA  advertising  smart_homes  iRobot  homes  home_appliances  home_automation  home_based  informed_consent 
july 2017 by jerryking
Toronto's smart thermostat startup Ecobee gets $35-million funding boost - The Globe and Mail
ALICJA SIEKIERSKA
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Aug. 22, 2016

A key part of Ecobee's growth strategy includes partnering Ecobee with high-tech home automation systems, including Apple’s HomeKit and Amazon Echo, which uses the company’s Alexa voice-activated artificial intelligence program. These smart home technologies allow users to control such things as lighting, appliances, security, heating and cooling using the Internet.

Ecobee was the first WiFi thermostat system to be compatible with Amazon Echo.
Ecobee  start_ups  thermostats  sensors  Amazon_Echo  Alexa  smart_homes  home_automation  voice_interfaces  artificial_intelligence  funding  Wi-Fi  Toronto 
august 2016 by jerryking
Short Cuts
October 10-11 | FT|

As homes get smarter, humans inch closer to being deposed as lords and masters. Now Amazon is accelerating the process: planning to connect washing machines to its website to or...
smart_homes  Amazon  connected_devices  Industrial_Internet  laundry_rooms  home_appliances  home_automation  white_goods 
november 2015 by jerryking
Companies Chase the Promise of High-Tech Homes - WSJ.com
JULY 22, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by BEN WORTHEN. Article
on the changing home-automation market which is essentially software
that's designed to act as a control panel for smart homes and which can
be accessed through the Web, either using a PC or a smart phone. This
changes a security system from something that alerts home owners when
someone tries to break in to a system that "helps people stay connected
to their home and family.
smart_homes  home_automation 
november 2009 by jerryking

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