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jerryking : hostages   8

Canadian diplomats warn Trudeau government about perils of deepening ties to Beijing
February 26, 2020 | The Globe and Mail | STEVEN CHASE.

Department of Global Affairs officials have warned the Trudeau government about the perils of deepening ties with China, saying the authoritarian state represents a “strategic challenge” to Canadian values and interests......Canada has for a long time seen China as primarily an economic opportunity, it must now consider the risks of deepening ties and take into account Beijing's long-term strategic challenge to Canada's interests and values......The document was provided to the House of Commons committee on Canada-China relations studying the deep chill in relations following Canada’s December, 2018, arrest of a Chinese executive on a U.S. extradition request. Beijing retaliated by slashing agricultural imports from Canada and practiced what critics call “hostage diplomacy” by locking up two Canadians.
“The crisis has demonstrated Beijing’s readiness and ability to use aggressive political and economic measures to punish Canada … and to propagate norms of international relations inimical to Canadian interest.......China purchases 4 % of Canada’s exports, making it the third-largest trading partner after the U.S. and the E.U. ......As the recent dispute with China has shown – where the Chinese temporarily blocked pork and beef from Canada and dramatically cut purchases of Canadian canola seed – Canadian producers who depend on this market are “vulnerable to sudden and arbitrary trade disruptions,”China is increasingly trying to rewrite the rules in world affairs.....China is a “strategic challenge”/run counter to Canadian values and interest.......China promotes perspectives on governance, economic security and human rights that diverge in fundamental ways from Canada’s........The memo cites China’s Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank as an example of how Beijing promotes its influence abroad. The Trudeau government signed up Canada to join the bank and pledged to purchase a stake worth $256-million. Through the bank and Beijing’s “Belt and Road Initiative” foreign investment campaign, China seeks to “leverage economic prowess to gain regional influence and export its model of [authoritarian] governance around the world,”.......The Chinese government attempts to promote its ideology by inserting CCP language into multilateral documents, challenging universal rights .........Global Affairs also said China’s tough posture in dealing with other countries may be a cover for domestic weaknesses. “There is the image of a global juggernaut but also evidence that Beijing’ assertiveness abroad seeks to compensate for fragility at home,” the memo said. China’s population is aging, the country “lacks a functional social safety net,” and its future development will be constrained by “acute levels of environmental degradation, pollution, corruption, consumer debt and other financial risk,” .........the briefing document warned that China’s bullying of self-ruled Taiwan....could pose one of the biggest challenges to the international order.
“The range of leverage and intimidation towards Taiwan …is even more intense and is likely to test the limits of the current rules-based system.”
AIIB  authoritarianism  Beijing  briefing  bullying  Canada  Canada-China_relations  China  China_rising  Chinese_Communist_Party  diplomacy  economic_warfare  environmental_degradation  exports  foreign_policy  Global_Affairs_Canada  hostage_diplomacy  hostages  House_of_Commons  Huawei  human_rights  influence_campaigns  international_system  Justin_Trudeau  memoranda  Meng_Wanzhou  national_interests  new_normal  One_Belt_One_Road  PMO  reassessments  reprisals  rules-based  strategic_thinking  Taiwan  threats  values  weaknesses 
5 weeks ago by jerryking
Globe editorial: China wants Canada to shut up. That’s exactly why we shouldn’t
December 2, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | EDITORIAL.

That’s why “guts” isn’t the answer. Canada needs to be smart, and exploit Beijing’s weaknesses.

The biggest one is the Chinese economy. Mr. Xi’s Orwellian surveillance state needs steady economic growth to keep Chinese citizens passive. Mr. Trump’s trade war has slowed China’s growth and made the Communist Party a bit more vulnerable than it would like.

You could see that in the threat made by China’s ambassador to Canada after the U.S. legislation standing up for Hong Kong was passed. “If anything happens like this, we will certainly have very bad damage in our bilateral relationship,” he said of a possible similar action by Ottawa.

The last thing China wants is a co-ordinated, global effort calling out its abuses. Which means there ought to be just such an effort. Instead of letting Beijing isolate it, Ottawa should explore strategic alliances that would prevent that from happening.

Which leads to China’s other weakness: Its actions in Hong Kong are a violation of the treaty it signed when it took over the territory from the British in 1997.

Beijing agreed to a “gradual and orderly” evolution to universal suffrage in Hong Kong. Instead, under Mr. Xi, it has moved in the opposite direction.

If democratic countries stood up as one and demanded that it live up to its commitments, it would be difficult for China to carry out retaliation.

Instead, too many countries like Canada are leaving it to brave Hong Kongers to battle alone for something the entire world has a stake in. We can do better.
alliances  asymmetrical  bullying  Canada  Canada-China_relations  China  China_rising  editorials  Hong_Kong  Huawei  hostages  Meng_Wanzhou  new_normal  reprisals  strategic_alliances  surveillance_state  weaknesses  Xi_Jinping 
december 2019 by jerryking
China is changing the geopolitical climate. Canada has to mitigate, and adapt
MAY 16, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | EDITORIAL.

So what’s Canada to do? In the long run, Canadian governments dealing with Beijing need to keep four things in mind.

China is more threat than opportunity. Unlike our other major trading partners, China is not a democratic, rule-of-law country. There was once hope China could behave as a rule-of-law country internationally, even as it remained a dictatorship at home. There was also a belief that China’s economic advances would lead to an opening up of its political system. That hasn’t happened. If anything, the Xi Jinping regime is turning back the clock on individual freedoms.

That lack of Chinese political liberalization is at the root of what is fast turning into a new Cold War. Among the problems: In a world of liberalized trade, the rules end up benefiting the totalitarian state, since its companies can access the protections of our legal system, while our companies are subject to perfectly legal shakedowns in China.

China is not our enemy. But it is not our friend. There was once a fantasy that friendship would be as easy as establishing personal connections with Beijing’s ruling circle. They would surely melt at the mention of the sainted memory of Norman Bethune, the Canadian physician who followed Mao Zedong, founder of the People’s Republic and murderer of millions.

Mao wasn’t a sentimental man and neither are his heirs.

To counterbalance China, we need allies. Canada has long worked to build multilateral alliances to give us a bit of leverage when dealing with our giant neighbour, the United States. The giant across the ocean presents a similar, but more troubling, challenge. The good news is we have natural allies. That list includes the U.S., at least in the post-Trump world. It includes the European Union. And it includes China’s worried democratic neighbours: Japan and South Korea.

We need to avoid becoming trade-dependent on China. We have natural allies who want to do likewise. That’s what the Trans-Pacific Partnership was supposed to be about. That’s what pursuing greater and freer trade with Japan and South Korea is about.

Canada should never aim to shut down trade with China. But we have to make sure the future doesn’t leave us without room to manoeuvre, or to push back.
adaptability  bullying  Canada  Canada-China_relations  China  China_rising  delusions  disillusioned  editorials  geopolitics  hostages  Huawei  kidnappings  Meng_Wanzhou  multilateralism  predatory_practices  reprisals  rogue_actors  threats  totalitarian  TPP  Xi_Jinping 
may 2019 by jerryking
China has taken our citizens and canola producers hostage. Here’s how Ottawa can muscle up - The Globe and Mail
APRIL 22, 2019 | Globe and Mail | by COLIN ROBERTSON, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL


Problem: For months, both Canadian citizens and a key part of the Canadian economy have been held hostage by China. After Canada’s detention of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou, Beijing responded; for nearly 150 days, Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig have been jailed, denied legal representation, forced to endure sleep deprivation and, in the case of the latter, had his diplomatic immunity abused as an on-leave Canadian foreign-service officer. Beijing then claimed that our canola is infected by pests. That canola embargo is a double whammy: It cuts our current market in half, and also sows doubt among Canadians about our health and safety standards.

If the Trudeau government continues to let this pass without response, we can expect the Chinese to ratchet up the pressure. Our beef, pork and seafood could be next.......A resurgent China is using the Meng affair to demonstrate its power and influence, and in doing so, it is redefining the norms of the rules-based order. Other authoritarians, looking to follow China’s lead, are watching closely.

Solution: * To address the canola embargo, we need to implement a food chain and inspection system that is the best in the world. We need to show foreign customers and Canadians alike that our food is of the highest quality and that “Made in Canada” is a signal of a premium brand. * the Canadian ministerial delegation being sent to China (to demonstrate to Chinese authorities that Canadian canola is pest-free) should read Lord Macartney’s account of his 1793 mission to China’s emperor, which was unsuccessful because of the deep divides between the two sides. * redeploy the trade commissioners recently added to China to markets of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations and Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership. * take the plight of the hostages to the various international human-rights tribunals and encourage human-rights NGOs to include them in their advocacy. * Press the cause of the million-plus Uyghurs kept in Chinese concentration camps * apply Magnitsky sanctions against those responsible for depriving the two Canadians of their human rights * Carefully inspect, with a “name and shame” approach to counterfeits and tainted goods, Chinese goods entering Canada. * formally declare that Huawei equipment will not be used in our 5G network buildout because we do not trust China. * arrest/expel Chinese agents are engaging in illicit activities or, if they are working under diplomatic cover, sent home.* send the current Chinese ambassador, Lu Shaye, packing. *Our next ambassador needs to be tough-minded and go into the job without illusions. Xi Jinping’s China is authoritarian, and does not care about human rights. It believes that its system is superior and more efficient than liberal democracy. *urge our allies to keep up the pressure.
ASEAN  authoritarianism  bullying  Canada  Canada-China_relations  canola  China  counterfeits  economic_warfare  food_safety  geographic_ingredient_branding  hostages  intimidation  Justin_Trudeau  Huawei  Meng_Wanzhou  norms  redeployments  reprisals  rules-based  TPP  Uyghurs 
april 2019 by jerryking
Hostage negotiation skills provide lessons for the boardroom
JANUARY 6, 2019 | Financial Times | Helen Warrell

A former police officer suggests using surprise to gain an advantage......she is instructing a class of young professional women on how to argue, persuade and arbitrate

She reels off the similarities. “We’re both in the situation where there’s a possibility of crisis,” Ms Williams tells us. “You need to be well-prepared, whether you’re talking to some terrorists on Iraq or going into a big meeting.” 

She adds that managing the stakeholders — such as the parents of abducted children — is sometimes harder than managing the kidnappers. “You’ve all got anxious bosses and CEOs to keep on side, which is difficult too.”...She advises preparing for salary negotiations by researching statistics, calculating averages, and making sure your pitch is evidence-based rather than impassioned......make clear this is a serious discussion, not a water-cooler conversation,”..... She advises using surprise to your advantage, effectively by springing meetings on bosses at a moment when they seem unoccupied and then asking “have I caught you in the middle of something?”. “It’s obvious when they’re not so it’s hard [for them] to pretend otherwise,”.....in response to someone deploying “hostile silence” in the face of requests for pay rises. “Don’t fill silence with nonsense, there’s a British trait of thinking every silence has to be filled,” instead, ask a direct question to force a response. “You could try, ‘what are you thinking about?’ or, ‘have I stunned you?’”.....Something that works well with alpha men is planting the seed that something you want is actually their idea: you can try saying, ‘did I hear you mention X’ or ‘have you thought about Y?’”

......tips for any important negotiation are first, identifying the people who are the “real decision makers”, then knowing what is negotiable, and preparing a second-best scenario to fall back on.
hostages  negotiations  salaries  Scotland_Yard  United_Kingdom  women  kidnappings  surprises 
january 2019 by jerryking
We must finally see China for what it truly is - The Globe and Mail
DAVID MULRONEY
CONTRIBUTED TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL

China’s furious response to Ms. Meng’s arrest has unsettled some Canadian observers who have commented that we should simply have looked the other way and allowed Ms. Meng to slip out of Vancouver. Thinking along these lines was encouraged by a typically clumsy intervention by U.S. President Donald Trump, who said he might use Ms. Meng as a bargaining chip if it helped him get a better deal in his trade negotiations with China.

As frustrating as the President’s comments were, we should not succumb to the belief that there is some moral equivalence between the United States and China. Our interests and values are still far more closely aligned with those of the United States than they are with China’s......We need to understand that China behaves the way it does because it works. ....Our attention all too quickly shifts from stories about China’s assertiveness and repression to stories about its gleaming cities and globe-trotting ultra-rich. We seem incapable of seeing it whole.....all the subplots about China (concerns about China as a violator of Iran sanctions, about the possibility that it uses corporations such as Huawei to vacuum foreign technology and about the stunning disregard it displays for the rights of citizens – foreign and Chinese), connect to a larger narrative that is finally taking hold, one that concedes that China is an increasingly irresponsible power and partner, one that feigns compliance with international norms only when it is convenient to do so......The current crisis offers an opportunity for new thinking. We can’t ignore China, nor should we disrespect it. But we need to consider whether our engagement of China should be as circumscribed and conditional as is China’s participation in our rules-based international order.....We should be discussing with allies how we can do a better job protecting sensitive technologies in our private and academic sectors, how we can more effectively ward off Chinese interference in our democratic political systems and how we can more effectively hold China accountable for respecting human rights at home and abroad.......It’s time for a new normal.
aligned_interest  bullying  Canada  Canada-China_relations  China  Huawei  hostages  Meng_Wanzhou  Donald_Trump  new_normal  reprisals 
december 2018 by jerryking

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