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jerryking : human_anatomy   11

Opinion | The Wisdom Your Body Knows - The New York Times
By David Brooks
Opinion Columnist

Nov. 28, 2019

**
** “How Emotions Are Made” by Lisa Feldman Barrett.
This has been a golden age for brain research.....we mistakenly believe that thinking happens only from the neck up.......scientists are now focusing on the thinking that happens not in your brain but in your gut. You have neurons spread through your innards, and there’s increasing attention on the vagus nerve, which emerges from the brain stem and wanders across the heart, lungs, kidney and gut. The vagus nerve is one of the pathways through which the body and brain talk to each other in an unconscious conversation. Much of this conversation is about how we are relating to others. Human thinking is not primarily about individual calculation, but about social engagement and cooperation.....When you enter a new situation, Porges argues, your body reacts. Your heart rate may go up. Your blood pressure may change. Signals go up to the brain, which records the “autonomic state” you are in....

a main purpose of the brain is to read the body, and to regulate "the body budget". Spotting a bully on the playground may cause one's brain to predict actions, speeds heart rates and breathing to deal with it. We experience these changes as emotion — e.g. fear, anger, etc. — because our brain has created an emotion concept [JCK - a lexicon??] to make those physical changes meaningful.

“You might think that in everyday life, the things you see and hear influence what you feel, but it’s mostly the other way around: What you feel alters your sight and hearing,”....... Under the old brain-only paradigm, we told people to self-regulate their emotions through conscious self-talk. But real emotional help comes through co-regulation. When a mother and a child physically hold each other, their bodily autonomic states harmonize, connecting on a metabolic level. Together they move from separate distress to mutual calm........the Welch Emotional Connection Screen, which measures the emotional connection between mothers and pre-term babies. ....When we step back and see the brain and body thinking together, the old distinction between reason and emotion doesn’t seem to make sense. Our perception of the world is shaped by the predictions our brains make about our physical autonomic states. It is vital to teach emotional granularity, something our culture pays almost no attention to. We’re not separate brains, coolly observing each other. We’re physical viscera, deeply interacting with each other. The important communication is happening at a much deeper level.
biology  Communicating_&_Connecting  David_Books  digestive_systems  emotional_connections  emotions  gastrointestinal  guts  human_anatomy  human_behavior  human_brains  logic_&_reasoning  mental_health  metabolism  op-ed  physical_touch  physiological_response  psychology  stress_response  thinking  wisdom 
december 2019 by jerryking
Gut feelings: How microbes may affect your mental health
MAY 24, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | PAUL TAYLOR.

......A growing body of research suggests that what’s happening in the gut may also have an impact on the brain.....In a study published in February, for instance, Belgian scientists reported that two types of gut bacteria tend to be depleted in people with depression. The significance of this study is still open to debate. Although the scientists found “an association” between the absence of certain gut microbes and depression, they didn’t actually prove one thing causes the other......adds support to earlier studies that demonstrated mood and behaviour could be altered by manipulating the gut’s microbial contents..[JCK: from David Brooks, "You have neurons spread through your innards, and there’s increasing attention on the vagus nerve, which emerges from the brain stem and wanders across the heart, lungs, kidney and gut. The vagus nerve is one of the pathways through which the body and brain talk to each other in an unconscious conversation. ].....It was once thought that depression resulted from a “chemical imbalance” in the brain. Based on this theory, patients should feel better by simply taking medications that restore the brain’s correct chemical balance.

But now researchers believe that there may be many different causes of depression, which is characterized by both structural and activity changes in the brain. Some evidence also suggests inflammation may play a role. “There are probably multiple types of depression that all masquerade as a single entity,” Sinyor explains. “And that’s the reason why we have many treatments that work, but certain treatments work for some people while other treatments work for others.”

Both Collins and Sinyor think it’s possible that research may eventually lead to new bacterial-based treatments for depression and other mental-health disorders.
bacteria  clinical_depression  digestive_systems  gastrointestinal  guts  human_anatomy  human_behavior  human_brains  mens'_health  mental_health  microbes  microbiome 
may 2019 by jerryking
Gut Feeling: To Stay Healthy, Keep Your Body’s Microbes in Line - WSJ
By Jo Craven McGinty
Aug. 17, 2018

the human body hosts a variety of microbes.....they helps digest our food, regulate our immune system and feed the cells that line the gut. But if its mix of microbes gets out of whack, the same organisms that ensure our health can make us sick.....“Not only irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease, but cardiovascular disease, even Parkinson’s, autism and multiple sclerosis,”.... illnesses—as well as obesity—have been transferred to mice by implanting (i.e. fecal transplants) the rodents with samples of the microbiomes of humans who suffer from the disorders.....The first step in understanding the microbiome is to document the assembly of microbes, and each person’s appears to be unique......Not all of the organisms in the human microbiome have been identified, but one of the better known is E. coli, a sometimes deadly bacteria that provided early evidence that microbes could be beneficial in treating human disease.

In World War I, a special kind of E. coli was found in a German soldier who, unlike his comrades, didn’t develop infectious diarrhea while stationed in an area of Europe where the disease was endemic.

E. coli Nissle, named for the professor who isolated the strain in 1917, became the active ingredient in a drug used to treat diarrhea, ulcerative colitis and other gastrointestinal disorders.
autism  bacteria  digestive_systems  E._coli  germs  gut_feelings  guts  microbes  microbiome  pathogens  mens'_health  gastrointestinal  human_anatomy 
august 2018 by jerryking
Glucosamine supplement does not help knee pain or deterioration - Health - CBC News
CBC News Posted: Mar 11, 2014

The use of a glucosamine supplement orally does not help in decreasing knee pain or lessen cartilage deterioration among people with chronic knee pain, says a new study.
running  exercise  osteoarthritis  injuries  knees  human_anatomy  alternative_medicine 
january 2015 by jerryking
Cool Running :: Knee Pain
By Josh Clark
Posted Thursday, 27 November, 1997
running  exercise  injuries  knees  human_anatomy 
november 2011 by jerryking
Blame Evolution for Disease - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 23, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By MELINDA BECK.
Obesity? Big Feet? Blame Darwin. Evolution Helped Humans Have Children
and Survive, But It Also Led to Modern-Day Maladies, Scientists Say.

Evolution, the theory goes, guarantees survival to the fittest. But we
can blame evolution for some of today's most pressing health problems,
such as cancer, obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease...Most
scientists—including biologists, anthropologists, paleontologists and
geneticists—see the 21st century human body as a collection of
compromises, jury-rigged by evolution as our ancestors adapted to
changing conditions.
Melinda_Beck  evolution  theory_of_evolution  disease  human_anatomy  Charles_Darwin  human_evolution 
february 2010 by jerryking

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