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jerryking : human_evolution   12

Opinion | Survival of the Sneakiest - The New York Times
By David P. Barash
Dr. Barash studies the evolutionary factors influencing human behavior.....Stealth can win out over speed and strength in the arms race of evolution.

Dec. 15, 2018
arms_race  evolution  natural_selection  human_behavior  stealth  human_evolution 
december 2018 by jerryking
Stone Age cave dwellers had healthier mouths than we do - The Globe and Mail
PAUL TAYLOR

The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Feb. 21 2013

Think of your mouth as being in a constant state of disease..."There is a very low diversity of bacterial species and a high prevalence of disease-causing pathogens."...In fact, our teeth and gums are generally in worse shape than our cave-dwelling ancestors....What's to blame? Our shift to a carbohydrate-rich diet – especially the increased consumption of processed sugar – fostered the growth of certain bacteria that cause gum disease and dental decay, "Hunter-gatherers in general had really good teeth. You see quite a bit of wear because of the highly abrasive nature of their diet, but you see almost no signs of pathology," said Cooper.

"That all changes with farming and the increased consumption of domesticated cereals," added Cooper.

The DNA analysis revealed that as agriculture took hold, there was a marked decrease in bacterial diversity and certain disease-causing microbes became more prevalent, including Porphyromonas gingivalis which contributes to gum disease.The composition of oral bacteria underwent another dramatic shift with the industrial revolution and the introduction of processed sugar and flour. There was a further decrease in diversity, and a rise in bacteria such as Streptococcus mutans, which causes dental caries commonly known as cavities......Diet has influenced the bacteria that inhabit the human body "and we can see that in the oral cavity," said Cooper. "One can pretty safely deduce that same thing has happened in the gastrointestinal system, which is arguably even more important in terms of the role of bacteria in human health."

Indeed, a growing body of medical research suggests that the loss of beneficial bacteria is associated with a range of modern systemic diseases, from diabetes and heart disease, to obesity and autism. And perhaps most important of all, a diverse gut bacteria is necessary to train the immune systems of young children.
evolution  bacteria  diets  dental  guts  disease  pathogens  digestive_systems  microbes  microbiome  gums  gastrointestinal  hunter-gatherers  immune_system  human_evolution 
february 2013 by jerryking
Matt Ridley's Mind & Matter: We're the Apes Who Set to Sea - WSJ.com
* MARCH 12, 2011

We Are the Apes Who Took to the Sea

*
By MATT RIDLEY
evolution  primates  human_evolution 
march 2011 by jerryking
Blame Evolution for Disease - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 23, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By MELINDA BECK.
Obesity? Big Feet? Blame Darwin. Evolution Helped Humans Have Children
and Survive, But It Also Led to Modern-Day Maladies, Scientists Say.

Evolution, the theory goes, guarantees survival to the fittest. But we
can blame evolution for some of today's most pressing health problems,
such as cancer, obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease...Most
scientists—including biologists, anthropologists, paleontologists and
geneticists—see the 21st century human body as a collection of
compromises, jury-rigged by evolution as our ancestors adapted to
changing conditions.
Melinda_Beck  evolution  theory_of_evolution  disease  human_anatomy  Charles_Darwin  human_evolution 
february 2010 by jerryking

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