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jerryking : human_scale   3

How to make Complicated Ideas Easy for Anyone to Understand
Feb. 14, 2015 | | Evoke.pro | by Rebecca Okamoto.

Describe your target audience
Normally when we explain something, we describe its features like dimensions, weight, and power. But when your concept is new-to-the-world or complicated, it can be tough for the listener to envision what you’re talking about.

So instead of describing your product or concept, describe your user or target audience.

Here's a great example from Patrick Sherwin, the Founder of GoSun, the maker of green cooking solutions. He was being interviewed on Todd Uterstaedt's brilliant podcast, from Founder to CEO.

Look how Patrick described one of their solar powered stoves that's ideal for the disaster relief vertical:

[The stove] has to be super durable, super easy to use by someone who doesn’t have time to read instructions...
As soon as Patrick gave this description, I immediately thought, “That’s me!” As someone who lives in earthquake prone California, I could easily imagine that GoSun had the right stove for me.

Here’s a competitor's description of their stove:

This is a panel type cooker, there is no limit to the dimension of pot that you use. Two large pots, 12" frypans, oblong cake pans, tall pots... they all fit. The cooking area is 12" deep and 17" wide. There is no height limit in the cooking area so just about any type of pot will fit!
If you were selecting a solar oven for your emergency kit, which one would you select?

Listen to Todd interview Patrick

Describe a breakthrough transformation your user would love
One of the biggest traps trendsetters and visionaries fall into is giving detailed (and confusing) explanations about features. To avoid this, they're told to describe benefits.

My advice? Forget features and benefits. Instead, describe a transformation your target audience obsesses over.

Here’s an example from Dyson. You probably know that Dyson makes innovative appliances like fans and vacuum cleaners. However, you may not know that they also sell hair styling products.

About 5 years ago, Dyson came out with the Supersonic hair dryer. They redesigned the hair dryer from the ground up, and used revolutionary technology so users could dry and style their hair in a fraction of the time. Dyson used descriptions like this to describe the Supersonic:

"The world's first blade-less, supersonic hairdryer with air multiplier technology… An intelligent hair dryer that reads air temperature 20x per second and is regulated by a microprocessor to protect natural shine"
Hmmm… I worked in the Salon Professional industry for 7 years, and I NEVER heard anyone say they needed an intelligent hair dryer.

Fast forward a few years, and Dyson's launched a new hair styling product, the Airwrap styler. Here’s how they describe it:

"A completely new way to style hair….The Dyson Airwrap styler curls your hair without damaging heat"
Dyson could have featured the Airwrap's technical features, like how it's powered by a 130 blade impeller that spins up to 110,000 rpm, and creates the “Coanda effect.”

Instead they described a breakthrough transformation: styling your hair without the damaging high heat that causes dry, brittle and unruly hair.

Forget the bells and whistles. Focus on what your user craves, and they’ll instantly understand what you’re selling.
analogies  clarity  Communicating_&_Connecting  comprehension  Dyson  engagement  human_scale  ideas  James_Dyson  infographics  storytelling  visionaries 
7 weeks ago by jerryking
Montreal’s amazing circus trick
Dec. 11 2012| The Globe and Mail | J. Kelly Nestruck

Celebrating its 10th anniversary, Les 7 doigts, a collective of jugglers, trapeze artists and acrobats from Canada, California and France, has been at the forefront of this new wave of smaller, artistically driven, not-for-profit circuses aiming to deliver thrills in more intimate surroundings and on what the troupe calls a “human scale,” the polar opposite of Cirque du Soleil’s giant spectacles. Along with these new circuses, infrastructure for the art form – theatres, a festival, maybe soon a museum – has mushroomed in Montreal over the past 10 years.

Les 7 doigts was the product of a two-day brainstorming session in 2002 by seven young Cirque du Soleil artists who wanted to branch out on their own to build sustainable careers as creators.

http://montreal.about.com/od/montrealevents/a/montreal_circus_arts_festival_international_des_arts_du_cirque.htm
Montreal  Cirque_du_Soleil  spin-offs  human_scale 
may 2013 by jerryking
When the Pieces Put Themselves Together - NYTimes.com
July 11, 2012 | NYT |By JENNIFER 8. LEE

Instead of assembly lines, what if manufacturing moved to self-assembly lines?

There is something counterintuitive about seeing toys and furniture that spring together simply when their pieces are shaken around and around.

Doesn’t this go against the principles of entropy we learned in high school science, where order is supposed to dissolve into disorder?

Actually, no. Self-assembly is a well-studied phenomenon on the molecular level — snowflakes, proteins, viruses — and one of the driving forces in nanotechnology. But researchers are taking principles from microbiology and applying them on the macro level — furniture, infrastructure and even buildings for space...Certain principles govern self-assembly. First, there needs to be a blueprint of the ultimate form. Second, the system needs to have forces of attraction that bring together the parts. These can either be magnets or electrostatic forces. Third, error correction has to allow the pieces to “fix” themselves when they assemble in the wrong way. Fourth, an external energy source is needed to activate the assembly. On the molecular level, this is often heat, but on the human scale it can be simple shaking. (It is actually this external energy source that allows self-assembly to seemingly violate the principle of entropy, since entropy is a law that applies only to isolated systems)...Self-assembly is most useful where human hands have difficulty bolting things together — outer space, extreme cold, free fall and deep oceans, he says.
self-assembly  manufacturers  toys  entropy  nanotechnology  error_correction  disorder  human_scale  blueprints 
july 2012 by jerryking

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