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jerryking : illness   11

Leafy Greens Cause the Most Illnesses—Mushrooms, the Least
January 30, 2013 | Business Week |By Venessa Wong.

The average American eats only 4 pounds of mushrooms each year, compared to 30 lbs. of lettuce.

Also, greens such as lettuce and spinach cause illness more frequently because they are consumed more often, not because they are grown or harvested in a riskier way than other vegetables...In fact, the problem with leafy greens has less to do with farming than with handling. Many were tainted with norovirus, which causes stomach flu, and “were most often contaminated during preparation or service by a sick food handler,” the report found. Infected persons are contagious “from the moment they begin feeling sick until at least three days after they recover” and can spread the virus through vomit and stool, according to the CDC.
illness  fresh_produce  product_recalls  Waudware  salads  CDC  food_safety  mushrooms  traceability  viruses 
april 2013 by jerryking
What to Say to a Friend Who's Ill - WSJ.com
April 12, 2013 | WSJ | By LETTY COTTIN POGREBIN.
The following are 10 Commandments for Conversing With a Sick Friend.

1. Rejoice at their good news. Don't minimize their bad news. A guy tells you that the doctors got it all, say "Hallelujah!" A man with advanced bladder cancer says that he's taking his kids to Disneyland next summer, don't bite your lip and mutter, "We'll see." Tell him it's a great idea. (What harm can it do?)..."Tell me what I can do to make things easier for you—I really want to help."

2. Treat your sick friends as you always did—but never forget their changed circumstance. Speak to them as you always did (tease them, kid around with them, get mad at them) but indulge their occasional blue moods or hissy-fits. Most important, start conversations about other things (sports, politics, food, movies) as soon as possible and you'll help speed their journey from the morass of illness to the miracle of the ordinary.

3. Avoid self-referential comments. A friend with a hacking cough doesn't need to hear, "You think that's bad? I had double pneumonia."...The truest thing you can say to a sick or suffering friend is, "I can only try to imagine what you're going through."

4. Don't assume, verify. Repeat after me: "Assume nothing."

5. Get the facts straight before you open your mouth.Did your friend have a heart or liver transplant? Chemo or radiation? Don't just ask, "How are you?" Ask questions specific to your friend's health. "How's your rotator cuff these days?" "Did the blood test show Lyme disease?" "Are your new meds working?" If you need help remembering who has shingles and who has lupus, or the date of a friend's operation, enter a health note under the person's name in your contacts list or stick a Post-it by the phone and update the information as needed.

6. Help your sick friend feel useful. Zero in on one of their skills and lead to it. Assuming they're up to the task, ask a cybersmart patient to set up a Web page for you; ask a bridge or chess maven to give you pointers on the game; ask a retired teacher to guide your teenager through the college application process. In most cases, your request won't be seen as an imposition but a vote of confidence in your friend's talent and worth.

7. Don't infantilize the patient. Never speak to a grown-up the way you'd talk to a child. Objectionable sentences include, "How are we today, dearie?" "That's a good boy." "I bet you could swallow this teeny-tiny pill if you really tried." And the most wince-worthy, "Are we ready to go wee-wee?" Protect your friend's dignity at all costs.

8. Think twice before giving advice.Don't forward medical alerts, newspaper clippings or your Aunt Sadie's cure for gout. Your idea of a health bulletin that's useful or revelatory may mislead, upset, confuse or agitate your friend. Sick people have doctors to tell them what to do. Your job is simply to be their friend.

9. Let patients who are terminally ill set the conversational agenda.If they're unaware that they're dying, don't be the one to tell them. If they know they're at the end of life and want to talk about it, don't contradict or interrupt them; let them vent or weep or curse the Fates. Hand them a tissue and cry with them. If they want to confide their last wish, or trust you with a long-kept secret, thank them for the honor and listen hard. Someday you'll want to remember every word they say.

10. Don't pressure them to practice 'positive thinking.' The implication is that they caused their illness in the first place by negative thinking—by feeling discouraged, depressed or not having the "right attitude." Positive thinking can't cure Huntington's disease, ALS or inoperable brain cancer....As one hospice patient put it, "All I want from my friends right now is the freedom to sulk and say goodbye."
bad_news  conversations  Communicating_&_Connecting  difficult_conversations  dignity  etiquette  hospice  ice-breakers  illness  positive_thinking  stressful  tension 
april 2013 by jerryking
Catching the Sights, Not the Bugs - NYTimes.com
By EMILY BRENNAN
Published: December 26, 2012

Q. What should you pack?

A. For any overseas trip, I recommend taking along self-treatment for traveler’s diarrhea — loperamide, known by the brand name Imodium here, and an antibiotic, the most common being ciprofloxacin.

If you’re going to a malarial area, the travel clinic should prescribe you malaria prophylaxis, the most common of which is Malarone, to take during your trip and seven days after it. That will kill off any parasites in your bloodstream, but two milder forms of malaria can continue to multiply in the liver. If you develop an unexplained fever six months, even a year, after your return, go to your doctor.

Other things to pack: Band-Aids and topical antibiotics to treat minor wounds; water purification tablets like Potable Aquaor Coghlan’s or portable filters; sunscreen; and insect repellent with 30 to 50 percent DEET. Hikers should bring a full suture kit. If you’re staying in accommodations that do not have good screens, I recommend getting mosquito nets and clothes impregnated with pyrethrum, a natural insect repellent.
travel  disease  prevention  mens'_health  illness  germs  insurance  malaria  diarrhea  packing  safety 
december 2012 by jerryking
Ancient Bones That Tell a Story of Compassion - NYTimes.com
By JAMES GORMAN
Published: December 17, 2012

some archaeologists are suggesting a closer, more systematic look at how prehistoric people — who may have left only their bones — treated illness, injury and incapacitation. Call it the archaeology of health care....Cases of case extreme examples of illness and disability, have prompted Ms. Lorna Tilley and Dr. Oxenham to ask what the dimensions of such a story are, what care for the sick and injured says about the culture that provided it....the “bioarchaeology of care,” “has the potential to provide important — and possibly unique — insights into the lives of those under study.” In the case of Burial 9, Tilley says, not only does his care indicate tolerance and cooperation in his culture, but suggests that he himself had a sense of his own worth and a strong will to live. Without that, she says, he could not have stayed alive...Ms. Tilley wrote “The Bioarchaeology of Care” for a special report on new directions in bioarchaeology published this year in the Archaeological Record, the magazine of the Society for American Archaeology.
archeological  disabilities  disease  compassion  research_methods  illness  injuries  incapacitation  prehistoric  bones  tolerance  cooperation  sickness  insights 
december 2012 by jerryking
Where Germs Lurk on Planes - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 20, 2011
Where Germs Lurk on Planes
What to Do When Stuck at 30,000 Feet Next to Sneezers and Coughers
By SCOTT MCCARTNEY
germs  viruses  flu_outbreaks  airports  mens'_health  airline_industry  travel  airlines  disease  safety  illness 
december 2011 by jerryking
Eluding Germs on Planes - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 22, 2003 | WSJ | Jennifer Saranow.

When Ronald Primas arrives at the airport for a flight, he picks up his boarding pass and heads through security. He then pops a decongestant and gives himself a spritz of nasal spray. Dr. Primas, a travel-medicine specialist in New York, says his germ-fighting routine helps him avoid catching colds and sinus infections on planes.

Once buckled into his seat, he rubs his hands with an alcohol-based sanitizer such as Purell -- and avoids touching his head and neck area until his hands are de-germed.

Dr. Primas is more worried about germs being passed by another person -- someone coughing on him, for example -- than from inanimate objects such as blankets or pillows, which he uses freely. (Those items, he says, have usually been recently washed.) But just to be safe, when he goes to the bathroom, he uses a tissue to open the door, flush and turn on the faucet.
flu_outbreaks  airports  mens'_health  aircraft  airline_industry  airlines  travel  germs  disease  illness  sanitation 
november 2011 by jerryking
In sickness and in health
September 20, 2005 | Globe & Mail Page A20 |By CATHY SOSNOWSKY
marriage  relationships  dating  illness  injuries  temperament 
november 2011 by jerryking

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