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jerryking : immaturity   8

George Trower-Subira, author, lecturer
December 16, 2010 | The Inquirer | by JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com

FOR A MAN who spent his life in the often frustrating struggle to win justice for African-Americans, George Russell Trower-Subira embodied the meaning of the Swahili word that he added to his given name.

"Subira" means "patience" in Swahili. And that was one of the main characteristics of George's character.

"He had incredible patience with people," said his brother, Len Trower. "Even people who did unjust things to him, he would forgive them. He would try to rationalize why they did it. Me? I'd be throwing things against the wall."

George Russell Trower-Subira, who grew up in Philadelphia as George Trower and wrote numerous books of self-help advice for African-Americans as George Subira, collapsed and died of a heart attack Sunday while jogging on the track at Penn Wood High School, in East Lansdowne. He was 66 and lived in East Lansdowne.

He was a major influence on the subject of black entrepreneurship through his writings and speeches. His book, "Black Folks Guide to Making Big Money in America," published in 1980, was the first to tell blacks that what was missing from their drive for equality was success in the economic arena.....George traveled the country expounding these views, and was in demand at schools and conferences as a speaker and teacher of economic values and business development for blacks.

He gained wide recognition for his ideas and was interviewed on the Phil Donahue show, the "Today" show, "Tony Brown's Journal" and the "700 Club," and was written up in Essence, Ebony, Jet and Black Enterprise, among others.
African-Americans  authors  economic_clout  entrepreneurship  entrepreneur  obituaries  black_power  conspicuous_consumption  distractions  entertainment  immaturity  pay_attention  self-discipline 
april 2019 by jerryking
Dr Boyce Watkins: The rise of black immaturity
October 26, 2017 | Black Wealth Channel | by Dr Boyce Watkins.

we must think carefully about what we're saying about the social, political and intellectual maturity of black people when we swear that the only way to get a black person to value learning is by making it light-hearted and fun. As my father used to tell me, "Everything ain't about fun and games. A man has to know when to get serious."

It would be a horrible thing to admit that our people are only capable of paying attention to life-saving knowledge when you mix it with a rap video or a bunch of dance moves. Are we saying that we are so immature that we can't concentrate on anything other than how to do the Electric Slide?....Here's a fact about communities that build real power. In order to obtain true strength in a competitive and racist world, some of us must have the discipline to sit down and PAY ATTENTION. This means paying attention without the bells and whistles, without the music, without the buffoonery. It means seeking to understand the world because that's what grown-ups are supposed to do to protect the people they love......In order for us to move forward, we must grow the hell up. Black people, unfortunately, have been fed and mass marketed false media culture that makes us the #1 consumers of all things unhealthy, including brain dead television, fast food, wasteful consumer spending (to look fly of course), social media and the worship of toxic, dysfunctional, violent, misogynistic, drug-addicted, financially irresponsible celebrities. If you ever want to know why the world doesn't take us seriously, it might be because we don't take ourselves seriously either.
African-Americans  Boyce_Watkins  conspicuous_consumption  distractions  economic_clout  entertainment  immaturity  pay_attention  self-discipline  sustained_inquiry 
october 2017 by jerryking
When the World Is Led by a Child - The New York Times
David Brooks MAY 15, 2017
-- "Trump is an infantalist" (or as most of call it, childish)
-- Trump's "falsehoods are attempts to build a world in which he can feel good"
-- He "is too incompetent to understand his own incompetence"
-- He "wants people to love him"
-- "there is perpetually less to Trump than it appears"
-- the Russian leak revealed Trump's"dangerousness"

Please, media, stop analyzing Trump's psychological makeup. He is the impulsive narcissistic you see. He really does think he is owed a "pledge of loyalty". He really does think he's smarter than the Generals, than scientists, experts, academics. He really does think he's owed constant adulation. He really is as hollow as he seems.
David_Brooks  Donald_Trump  immaturity  ignorance  self-discipline  self-awareness  sociopaths  narcissism  impulse_control  letters_to_the_editor 
may 2017 by jerryking
When the President Is Ignorant of His Own Ignorance - The New York Times
Thomas B. Edsall MARCH 30, 2017

How prepared is our president for the next great foreign, economic or terrorist crisis?

After a little more than two months in office, President Trump has raised doubts about his ability to deal with what the former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld famously described as the “known unknowns” and the “unknown unknowns.”

“President Trump seems to have no awareness whatsoever of what he does and does not know,” Steven Nadler, a professor of philosophy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, wrote me. “He is ignorant of his own ignorance.”

During his first 63 days in office, Trump made 317 “false or misleading claims,” according to The Washington Post.
Donald_Trump  ignorance  U.S.foreign_policy  crisis  lying  Donald_Rumsfeld  unknowns  immaturity  self-discipline  self-awareness  SecDef  ethno­nationalism 
march 2017 by jerryking
Snap Out of It: Kids Aren't Reliable Tech Predictors - WSJ.com
Nov. 17, 2013 | WSJ | By Farhad Manjoo.

First, Snapchat's main selling point is ephemerality. Users who send a photo and caption using the app can select how long the image is viewable. Second, and relatedly, Snapchat is used primarily by teens and people in college. This explains much of Silicon Valley's obsession with the company....tech execs, youngsters are the canaries in the gold mine.

That logic follows a widely shared cultural belief: We all tend to assume that young people are on the technological vanguard, that they somehow have got an inside scoop on what's next. If today's kids are Snapchatting instead of Facebooking, the thinking goes, tomorrow we'll all be Snapchatting, too, because tech habits, like hairstyles, flow only one way: young to old.

There is only one problem with elevating young people's tastes this way: Kids are often wrong....Incidentally, though 20-something tech founders like Mr. Zuckerberg, Steve Jobs and Bill Gates get a lot of ink, they are unusual.... "The twentysomething inexperienced founder is an outlier, not the norm," ...If you think about it for a second, the fact that young people aren't especially reliable predictors of tech trends shouldn't come as a surprise. Sure, youth is associated with cultural flexibility, a willingness to try new things that isn't necessarily present in older folk. But there are other, less salutary hallmarks of youth, including capriciousness, immaturity, and a deference to peer pressure even at the cost of common sense. This is why high school is such fertile ground for fads. And it's why, in other cultural areas, we don't put much stock in teens' choices. No one who's older than 18, for instance, believes One Direction is the future of music....Is the app just a youthful fad, just another boy band, or is it something more permanent; is it the Beatles?

To figure this out, we would need to know why kids are using it. Are they reaching for Snapchat for reasons that would resonate with older people—because, like the rest of us, they've grown wary of the public-sharing culture promoted by Facebook and Twitter? Or are they using it for less universal reasons, because they want to evade parental snooping, send risqué photos, or avoid feeling left out of a fad everyone else has adopted?

At this point no one knows, probably not even the people who make Snapchat. For now,That's reason enough to be wary of Snapchat's youthful vigor.
capriciousness  customer_risk  developmental_change  ephemerality  fads  Farhad_Manjoo  generational_change  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  immaturity  impermanence  invisibility  motivations  peer_pressure  predictors  Silicon_Valley  Snapchat  snooping  transient  trends  young_people  youth 
november 2013 by jerryking
carnage and culture: Jason Whitlock: Taylor's death a grim reminder for us all
November 30, 2007 | FOXSports.com | Jason Whitlock.
HBO did a fascinating documentary on Little Rock Central High School, the Arkansas school that required the National Guard so that nine black kids could attend in the 1950s. Fifty years later, the school is one of the nation's best in terms of funding and educational opportunities. It's 60 percent black and located in a poor black community.

Watch the documentary and ask yourself why nine poor kids in the '50s risked their lives to get a good education and a thousand poor black kids today ignore the opportunity that is served to them on a platter.

Blame drugs, blame Ronald Reagan, blame George Bush, blame it on the rain or whatever. There's only one group of people who can change the rotten, anti-education, pro-violence culture our kids have adopted. We have to do it.

The "keepin' it real" mantra of hip hop is in direct defiance to evolution. There's always someone ready to tell you you're selling out if you move away from the immature and dangerous activities you used to do, you're selling out if you speak proper English, embrace education, dress like a grown man, do anything mainstream.

The Black KKK is enforcing the same crippling standards as its parent organization. It wants to keep black men in their place — uneducated, outside the mainstream and six feet deep.
NFL  self-help  hip_hop  killings  violence  African-Americans  thug_code  dysfunction  documentaries  HBO  immaturity  integration  students  '50s  education  civil_rights  high_schools 
august 2012 by jerryking

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