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Da Vinci code: what the tech age can learn from Leonardo
April 26, 2019 | Financial Times | by Ian Goldin.

While Leonardo is recognised principally for his artistic genius, barely a dozen paintings can be unequivocally attributed to him. In life, he defined himself not as an artist but as an engineer and architect......History does not repeat itself, but it rhymes. The Renaissance catapulted Italy from the Medieval age to become the most advanced place on Earth. Then, as now, change brought immense riches to some and growing anxiety and disillusionment to others. We too live in an age of accelerating change, one that has provoked its own fierce backlash. What lessons can we draw from Leonardo and his time to ensure that we not only benefit from a new flourishing, but that progress will be sustained? When we think of the Renaissance, we think of Florence. Leonardo arrived in the city in the mid 1460s, and as a teenager was apprenticed to the painter Verrocchio. The city was already an incubator for ideas. At the centre of the European wool trade, by the late 14th century Florence had become the home of wealthy merchants including the Medicis, who were bankers to the Papal Court. The city’s rapid advances were associated with the information and ideas revolution that defines the Renaissance. Johann Gutenberg had used moveable type to publish his Bible in the early 1450s, and between the time of Leonardo’s birth in 1452 and his 20th birthday, some 15m books were printed, more than all the European scribes had produced over the previous 1,500 years.

..as Leonardo knew, and the Silicon Valley techno-evangelists too often neglect, information revolutions don’t only allow good ideas to flourish. They also provide a platform for dangerous ideas. The Zuckerberg information revolution can pose a similar threat to that of Gutenberg.

In the battle of ideas, populists are able to mobilise the disaffected more effectively than cerebral scientists, decently disciplined innovators and the moderate and often silent majority. For progress to prevail, evidence-based, innovative and reasoned thinking must triumph.
.....Genius thrived in the Renaissance because of the supportive ecosystem that aided the creation and dissemination of knowledge — which then was crushed by the fearful inquisitions. Today, tolerance and evidence-based argument are again under threat.
accelerated_lifecycles  architecture  broad-based_scientific_enquiry  capitalization  cross-disciplinary  cross-pollination  curiosity  dangerous_ideas  digital_economy  diversity  engineering  evidence_based  Florence  genius  globalization  human_potential  ideas  immigrants  Italy  industry_expertise  Johan_Gutenberg  lessons_learned  Leonardo_da_Vinci  Medicis  medieval  physical_place  polymaths  observations  Renaissance  Renaissance_Man  Silicon_Valley  silo_mentality  tolerance  unevenly_distributed  visionaries 
april 2019 by jerryking
This 8-Year-Old Chess Champion Will Make You Smile
March 16, 2019 | The New York Times | By Nicholas Kristof, Opinion Columnist.

Overcoming life’s basic truth: Talent is universal, but opportunity is not.
******************************************************************************'
Tanitoluwa Adewumi, a homeless third grader has just won his category at the New York State chess championship, outwitting children from elite private schools with private chess tutors. What’s even more extraordinary is that Tani, as he is known, learned chess only a bit more than a year ago. His play has skyrocketed month by month, and he now has seven trophies by his bed in the homeless shelter.

“I want to be the youngest grandmaster,” he told me.

Tani’s family fled northern Nigeria in 2017, fearing attacks by Boko Haram terrorists on Christians such as themselves. “I don’t want to lose any loved ones,” his father, Kayode Adewumi, told Kristof.
chess  homelessness  immigrants  New_York_City  Nicholas_Kristof  op-ed  refugees  unevenly_distributed 
march 2019 by jerryking
Another Melting Pot Boils Over Due to Immigration | Fast Forward | OZY
A former British colony that gained independence in 1966, modern Guyana was largely built with the help of generations of Indian indentured laborers. Their descendants, now known as East Indians, make up 40 percent of the population, while Afro-Guyanese — descendants of African slaves — comprise 30 percent. Groups of Indian, African, European, Chinese and indigenous heritage are all prominent.
Guyana  human_trafficking  immigration  immigrants  melting_pot 
july 2018 by jerryking
Dear Americans: Welcome to Canada - The Globe and Mail
IRVIN STUDIN
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, May 09, 2016
Campaign_2016  Donald_Trump  crossborder  opportunistic  immigrants  U.S. 
may 2016 by jerryking
A fighter for immigration, inclusion and diversity - The Globe and Mail
RICHARD BLACKWELL
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Apr. 17 2015,

After years of running the poverty-fighting Maytree Foundation, last fall Ratna Omidvar was named head of the new Global Diversity Exchange housed at the Ted Rogers School of Management at Toronto’s Ryerson University. The GDX, as she calls it, will do research and exchange information about diversity and the inclusion of immigrants and visible minorities – not just in Canada but all over the world.

It is essentially a “think-and-do tank,”...the GDX will tap into the great minds who have studied immigration and settlement, while sharing concrete strategies and experiences that have worked effectively.

While national governments function as the gatekeepers for immigration – letting people in or keeping them out – it is local efforts, usually at the city level, that make the difference in getting immigrants to prosper, she said.
immigration  women  diversity  Ryerson  leaders  immigrants  leadership  networking  boards_&_directors_&_governance  Maytree  talent_pipelines  under-representation  Ratna_Omidvar  Toronto  cities  think_tanks 
april 2015 by jerryking
Makers and Breakers - NYTimes.com
NOV. 8, 2014 | NYT | Thomas L. Friedman.

This is a great time to be a maker, an innovator, a starter-upper. Thanks to the Internet, you can raise capital, sell goods or services and discover collaborators and customers globally more easily than ever. This is a great time to make things. But it is also a great time to break things, thanks to the Internet. If you want to break something or someone, or break into somewhere that is encrypted, and collaborate with other bad guys, you can recruit and operate today with less money, greater ease and greater reach than ever before. This is a great time to be a breaker. That’s why the balance of power between makers and breakers will shape our world every bit as much as the one between America, Russia and China.
Tom_Friedman  entrepreneurship  hackers  Cleveland  innovation  start_ups  immigrants  rogue_actors  supply_chains  globalization  lean  small_business  microproducers  Israeli 
november 2014 by jerryking
After moving here, I think Americans would be happier if they were Canadians - The Globe and Mail
JACOB BUURMA
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jun. 30 2014

As a country with two official languages, there’s always a second opinion, a perennial need to co-operate across cultural lines to move forward. Until that moment, I didn’t grasp that humility, empathy and co-operation are the virtues that actually matter on the world stage.

Canadian theologian Victor Shepherd says that the depth of our relationships is measured by the degree to which they change us. If we have been married to someone for 35 years but remain unchanged, we actually don’t know our spouse at all....Americans tend to wear their emotions on their sleeves. I still find this a virtue, but no longer an unqualified one. In truth, my high-school football team set records for consecutive losses; something more than “pep” was needed to turn it around.

By comparison, I’ve found Canada’s capacity for honest observation a helpful corrective. After a dozen years north of the border, I’m listening more and speaking less. I’m more aware of “the other.”
crossborder  immigrants  relationships  Canadian  values  patriotism  virtues  humility  empathy  co-operation  world_stage 
july 2014 by jerryking
Toronto wise to hold off celebrating Wynne’s victory - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 13 2014

Ontario, and by extension its capital city, is facing big challenges. Once the dynamo of the national economy, the province is struggling to create jobs and maintain growth. Joblessness runs consistently above the national average. Ontario’s troubles have obvious and serious effects on Toronto. This city is in the process of moving from big city to true metropolis. Hundreds of thousands of immigrants are arriving every decade from all corners of the world. The city is growing up (quite literally, in its booming downtown). Will it thrive on this growth or choke on it?

To cope, Toronto needs to invest in transit, roads, water systems and other key infrastructure. It needs to reform its often-inept city government, making it leaner and more responsive. If it is to overcome the stresses of growth and continue to thrive in the coming years, it needs the consistent help of the provincial government, to which city hall is tightly tethered.

More than that, it needs Ontario to succeed. Ontario’s problem is Toronto’s problem.

Mr. Hudak’s Conservatives and Ms. Wynne’s Liberals offered starkly different solutions. Mr. Hudak promised to cut big government down to size, trim corporate taxes and spur job creation that way. Ms. Wynne promised to invest instead of cut, pouring money into transit and other needs.
Marcus_Gee  Toronto  Kathleen_Wynne  Ontario  Liberals  joblessness  job_creation  immigrants  immigration  responsiveness 
june 2014 by jerryking
Achievement gaps: Revenge of the tiger mother
May 5th 2014 | | The Economist |

Yet despite this pushback, the Asian-American achievement advantage is well documented, and Amy Hsin and Yu Xie, sociologists at City University of New York and the University of Michigan, wanted to try to find out why it exists. In a new paper in the journal PNAS, they looked at whether it could be explained by socio-demographic factors (such as family income and parental education), cognitive ability (were these children simply more intelligent?), or work ethic.

Although Asian Americans do often come from better educated and higher income families, socio-demographic factors could not explain the achievement gap between Asians and whites. This is because recently arrived Asian immigrants with little formal education and low incomes have children that do better in school than their white peers. Asian-Americans actually fall into four distinct categories in America. East and South-Asian children tend to be socio-economically privileged, whereas South-East Asian and Filipino children tend to be disadvantaged.

Being brainier isn't the answer either. When the pair looked at cognitive ability as measured by standardised tests, Asian-Americans were not different from their white peers. Instead Dr Hsin and Dr Xie find that the achievement gap can be explained through harder work—as measured by teacher assessments of student work habits and motivation. (Although the authors warn that this form of assessment will capture both true behavioural differences as well as a teacher’s perception of differences.)

What might explain harder work? The authors point to the fact Asian-Americans are likely to be immigrants or children of immigrants who, as a group, tend to be more optimistic. These are people who have made a big move in search of better opportunities. Immigration is a "manifestation of that optimism through effort, that you can have a better life". Added to this mix is a general cultural belief among Asian-Americans that achievement comes with effort. We know that children who believe ability is innate are more inclined to give up if something doesn't come naturally. An understanding that success requires hard work—not merely an aptitude—is therefore useful. This finding is worth bearing in mind when considering the current fuss over new tests in mathematics, as some parents complain that they are now too hard.
achievement_gaps  students  Amy_Chua  immigrants  Tiger_Moms  parenting  ethnic_communities  grit  Asian-Americans  hard_work 
may 2014 by jerryking
What Drives Success? - NYTimes.com
JAN. 25, 2014 | NYT | By AMY CHUA and JED RUBENFELD.

the strikingly successful groups in America today share three traits that, together, propel success. The first is a superiority complex — a deep-seated belief in their exceptionality. The second appears to be the opposite — insecurity, a feeling that you or what you’ve done is not good enough. The third is impulse control.

Any individual, from any background, can have what we call this Triple Package of traits. But research shows that some groups are instilling them more frequently than others, and that they are enjoying greater success.

It’s odd to think of people feeling simultaneously superior and insecure. Yet it’s precisely this unstable combination that generates drive: a chip on the shoulder, a goading need to prove oneself. Add impulse control — the ability to resist temptation — and the result is people who systematically sacrifice present gratification in pursuit of future attainment.

Ironically, each element of the Triple Package violates a core tenet of contemporary American thinking....The same factors that cause poverty — discrimination, prejudice, shrinking opportunity — can sap from a group the cultural forces that propel success. Once that happens, poverty becomes more entrenched. In these circumstances, it takes much more grit, more drive and perhaps a more exceptional individual to break out.
brainpower  willpower  poverty  movingonup  Amy_Chua  Mormons  ethnic_communities  immigrants  ksfs  self-discipline  perseverance  achievement_gaps  paranoia  Sonia_Sotomayor  overachievers  sacrifice  delayed_gratification  impulse_control  insecurity  exceptionality  superiority_complex  dual-consciousness  cultural_values  hardships 
january 2014 by jerryking
Startup visa program nears approval of first applicants - The Globe and Mail
BRENDA BOUW

Vancouver — Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Monday, Nov. 11 2013,
immigrants  immigration  start_ups  entrepreneur 
november 2013 by jerryking
The pivot point
September 27, 2013 | RoB Magazine | Gordon Pitts.
Kevin Lynch's big ideas on reviving the East Coast economy don't include big government
economic_development  Gordon_Pitts  Atlantic_Canada  immigration  immigrants  Kevin_Lynch  thinking_big 
september 2013 by jerryking
Rising prices curb dream of buying farmland - The Globe and Mail
JOEL SCHLESINGER

WINNIPEG — Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Monday, Sep. 09 2013,
agriculture  farming  farmland  immigrants 
september 2013 by jerryking
If BlackBerry is sold, Canada faces an innovation vacuum - The Globe and Mail
Aug. 17 2013 | The Globe and Mail | KONRAD YAKABUSKI.

The sale and breakup of a flagship technology company is a reoccurring theme in Canadian business. But this time is different. If BlackBerry Ltd. goes, there is no ready replacement. That’s a telling switch from the situation Canada faced with the sale of Newbridge Networks in 2000 and the demise of Nortel Networks in 2009....Canada has an innovation bottleneck. An abundance of science is generated in university labs and start-up firms but most of it never finds its way into commercial applications. Risk-averse banks and too many businesses of the bird-in-the-hand variety remain the weak links in Canada’s innovation system.

“We punch above our weight in idea generation,” observes Michael Bloom, who leads the Conference Board of Canada’s Centre for Business Innovation. “But the further you move towards commercialization, the weaker we get as a country.”....Innovation can be driven by any sector, even the old-economy resource extraction business of the oil sands. But tech firms remain by far the most R&D-intensive players in any economy.

Hence, the tech sector is a key barometer of a country’s innovation strength. And innovation matters because it has a profound influence on our living standards – it is “the key long-run driver of productivity and income growth,” ...Canadian businesses remain oddly complacent.

“We tend in this county not to look at the true market opportunity of innovation,” Mr. Bloom adds. “If you only see a market of 35 million people, you’re going to see more risk than if you see the market as Europe, the U.S. and Asia. Americans see risk, but also great opportunity.”

It’s no coincidence that many of Canada’s greatest entrepreneurs and innovators have been immigrants. Unlike his American counterpart, the average Canadian business graduate does not dream of becoming the next Sergey Brin, Steve Jobs or, for that matter, Peter Munk.

Mr. Lazaridis and ex-BlackBerry co-CEO Jim Balsillie notwithstanding, how many Canadian entrepreneurs and innovators have truly changed the world, or aspire? By all accounts, not that many. A Conference Board study released last month found that only 10 per cent of Canadian firms (almost all of them small ones) pursue “radical or revolutionary” innovations. Large firms focus at best on “incremental” innovations.
Blackberry  bottlenecks  commercialization  competitiveness_of_nations  complacency  hollowing_out  Konrad_Yakabuski  Newbridge  Nortel  innovation  idea_generation  ecosystems  breakthroughs  incrementalism  large_companies  sellout_culture  Jim_Balsillie  moonshots  immigrants  Canada  Peter_Munk  market_opportunities  weak_links  thinking_big  oil_sands  resource_extraction  marginal_improvements  innovation_vacuum  punch-above-its-weight  This_Time_is_Different 
august 2013 by jerryking
The Workers Defense Project, a Union in Spirit - NYTimes.com
By STEVEN GREENHOUSE
Published: August 10, 2013
for Eden.
The Workers Defense Project is one of 225 worker centers nationwide aiding many of the country’s 22 million immigrant workers. The centers have sprouted up largely because labor unions have not organized in many fields where immigrants have gravitated, like restaurants, landscaping and driving taxis. And there is another reason: many immigrants feel that unions are hostile to them. Some union members say that immigrants, who are often willing to work for lower wages, are stealing their jobs. ....Worker centers, which are among the most vigorous champions of overhauling immigration laws, coalesce around issues or industries....With labor unions losing members and influence, these centers are increasingly seen as an important alternative form of workplace advocacy, although no one expects them to be nearly as effective as unions in winning raises, pensions or paid vacations....“Worker centers are part of the broad scramble of how to improve things for workers outside the traditional union/collective bargaining context. They’ve become little laboratories of experimentation.”
labor  labour  unions  immigrants  workplaces  construction 
august 2013 by jerryking
Why Asian greens are red-hot with gardeners
Jun. 19 2013 | The Globe and Mail |DAVE McGINN.

In Canada, Asian vegetables have become staples at garden centres and seed companies, thanks largely to demographics. With the number of Asian Canadians on the rise, markets are responding to suit their tastes. But the popularity of growing these veggies is hardly limited to those of Asian heritage. Gardeners of all kinds are being drawn to them thanks to the fact that many are quick and easy to grow and offer something more exotic that tomatoes and carrots.

To feed the demand, new farms that specialize in growing Asian vegetables are sprouting up, like Red Pocket Farm in Toronto.
fresh_produce  salads  gardening  Asian  immigrants  ethnic_communities 
june 2013 by jerryking
For Foreign Investors, Profit Isn’t Only Goal - New York Times
March 16, 2008
Square Feet | Checking In
For Foreign Investors, Profit Isn’t Only Goal
By FRED A. BERNSTEIN
investors  immigration  immigrants  visas 
august 2012 by jerryking
Europe’s Lycamobile plans Canadian foray - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 23 2012 | The Globe and Mail | by Rita Trichur.
European telecommunications provider Lycamobile is planning to shake up Canada’s $18-billion wireless market with a new service aimed at immigrants and other ethnic consumers who regularly talk and text with family and friends living overseas.
telecommunications  globalization  wireless  immigrants  ethnic_communities  MVNOs 
july 2012 by jerryking
Immigrants Make Up Big, But Ignored, Niche
Nov 2002 | American Banker | Davenport, Todd Davenport.

Bank of America Corp. and Wells Fargo & Co. are among the banking companies that now let Mexican immigrants open bank accounts with a matricula consular, a form of basic identification offered by the Mexican consulate. Bank of America's pilot program to accept the matricula was so well received that it extended the program to all states on June 1. "The word is definitely out there among the immigrant communities," said Gillian Breidenbach, a spokeswoman for the Charlotte company.

Wells Fargo said it has opened 60,000 accounts since it started accepting the matricula a year ago. It now recognizes a similar card from the Guatemalan consulate and is "in conversations with other Latin American countries" to expand the program, said Wells spokeswoman Miriam Galicia Duarte. The San Francisco company is also talking with officials in the Philippines about the program, she said

The programs are popular, but it may be too early to say if they are profitable. Maintaining low-balance accounts is a costly proposition for a bank, and the means to recoup those expenses could deter consumers. Checking accounts with limited transactions, perhaps tied to a remittance product, could be a solution. Banks apparently need to be creative (in providing services) and patient.
immigrants  remittances  ProQuest  Mexican  niches  underserved  unbanked  pilot_programs 
june 2012 by jerryking
Class Action
March 31, 2003 | Canadian Business | Dawn Calleja.

The unemployment rate for immigrants to Canada aged 25 to 44 was double that of people born in Canada. In large part, that is because many immigrants need to upgrade their credentials. Ratna Omidvar is executive director of the Maytree Foundation, a charitable organization. In 1999, Omidvar approached Howard Bogach, CEO of Toronto's Metro Credit Union, with a proposal: why not offer loans to immigrants who want to upgrade but who cannot get a traditional bank loan.
Maytree  immigrants  under-representation  credit_unions  unemployment_rates  Ratna_Omidvar 
june 2012 by jerryking
Payback Time - Forbes.com
August.06.2001 | Forbes | Matthew Swibel.
credit_cards  immigrants 
june 2012 by jerryking
Immigrant Businesses Gain an Edge - WSJ.com
March 20, 2007 | WSJ | By RAYMUND FLANDEZ.
Immigrants Gain Edge Doing Business Back Home
Knowledge of Culture, Personal Connections Help to Open Doors
immigrants  entrepreneur  Vietnam  Raymund_Flandez 
june 2012 by jerryking
Beyond borders
November 2003 | Credit Union Management | Charlene Komar Storey

ABSTRACT
Focuses on ways credit unions are helping immigrants in the U.S. Immigrants' perceptions of credit unions; Changes in credit union policies aimed at accommodating the financial needs of immigrants; Keys to credit unions' success in attracting immigrant business. ...Although some banks and credit unions have been working hard to attract immigrants, not all immigrants have rushed to embrace the bank concept. Many have brought traditional savings and loan set-ups with them, and prefer these known structures to turning over their money to unfamiliar and unknown institutions.

Most revolve around rotating credit clubs. Korean immigrants call their associations kyes; Pakistanis, kommittis; and ethnic Chinese in the United States, huis. West Indian, Dominican and Tunisian immigrant communities have similar associations.
ProQuest  immigrants  credit_unions 
june 2012 by jerryking
Why Indian Americans are Best at Bees - India Real Time - WSJ
June 2, 2012 | WSJ | By Visi Tilak.

“It’s stunning… The fact that Indians would ever win is noteworthy. The fact that they would win more than once is impressive,” Pawan Dhingra, a curator at the Smithsonian Institution’s Asian Pacific American Program, said in an interview on National Public Radio. “But the fact that they would win at such a dominating level becomes almost a statistical impossibility. It’s phenomenal, really. There is more than randomness going on.”
immigrants  spelling  students  children  Indian-Americans  randomness 
june 2012 by jerryking
Consumer banking: Counter revolution
May 19th 2012 | | The Economist | Anonymous

the growth of internet usage on smartphones, the rise of “big data” computer processing and the increasing willingness of customers to do complicated things online. These developments have long promised to transform the way banks do business and organise themselves....If this was just a more convenient way of paying, the banks would probably shrug. But it also promises to overturn your existing financial relationships. Instead of reaching for the first card that happens to be in your wallet to pay for a $2 cup of coffee (and risk being charged a $35 penalty by your bank for exceeding your overdraft limit), your phone will choose the best method of payment.
banking  disruption  massive_data_sets  Google  judgment  Paypal  Square  smartphones  data_mining  immigrants  migrants  remittances  mobile_phones 
may 2012 by jerryking
Why Canada needs a flood of immigrants - The Globe and Mail
Joe Friesen — Demographics reporter
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 04, 2012
immigration  immigrants  Canada 
may 2012 by jerryking
Canada must actively recruit the best and brightest immigrants - The Globe and Mail
Globe Editorial
Canada must actively recruit the best and brightest immigrants
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 04, 2012

The world has changed, and when it comes to its immigration system, Canada is not changing fast enough to compete in it. It is no longer possible to sit back languidly, as the best and the brightest queue on its doorstep. The global market for human capital is voracious. There may always be migrants wanting to come to Canada, but they may not be the ones that Canada needs. People with options are less and less likely to tolerate hidebound and cumbersome immigration process, waiting as long as eight years to have their applications processed. If you are ambitious, if you are skilled, if you are entrepreneurial, if you are educated, if you are impatient for success, you will look elsewhere. Increasingly, elsewhere is looking better.
war_for_talent  editorials  recruiting  talent  immigrants  immigration  best_of  cream_skimming 
may 2012 by jerryking
Trust in Poor Built Consumer Empire For Israeli Brothers - WSJ.com
August 20, 2004 | WSJ | By MIRIAM JORDAN.

Credito Hispano
Trust in Poor Built Consumer Empire For Israeli Brothers
At La Curacao in Los Angeles, Newcomers Get Homey Air, Often a First Charge Card
Sending a Stereo to Guatemala
Israeli  immigrants  customer_loyalty  Hispanic_Americans  credit  credit-ratings  credit_cards  creditworthiness  credit_scoring  La_Curacao  retailers 
april 2012 by jerryking
TD Taps Canada's Mosaic for Growth
28 February 2006 | The Globe and Mail | Sinclair Stewart
TD_Bank  ethnic_communities  immigrants  banking  banks 
march 2012 by jerryking
Exotic vegetables coming soon from a farmer near you - The Globe and Mail
Jan. 05, 2012 | Globe & Mail | Rita Trichur.

One estimate pegs domestic sales of exotic vegetables at roughly $800-million a year. The bulk of that produce is imported from the Caribbean, South America and Asia. But with demand booming, Canadian farmers have a fresh incentive to carve out a meaningful slice of that market by diversifying their crops.

Although cooler Canadian climates can present a production challenge, scientists spearheading world crop research at the Vineland Research and Innovation Centre near Niagara Falls, Ont., say a surprising number of exotic vegetables can be successfully grown across the country.
vegetables  ethnic_communities  demographic_changes  farming  agriculture  food  Wal-Mart  Sobeys  immigrants  Loblaws 
january 2012 by jerryking
Immigrant-investor program in Maritimes collapses in scandal, lawsuits | News | National Post
Immigrant-investor program in Maritimes collapses in scandal, lawsuits

Tamsin McMahon Dec 17, 2011 – 2:00 AM ET | Last Updated: Dec 17, 2011
immigrants  investors  Canada  scandals 
december 2011 by jerryking
For Ex-Nurses, Real Money's in Takeout - NYTimes.com
By Louise Kramer
Published: April 4, 2004

Restaurants are notoriously challenging to run. An owner must juggle customer service, logistics, management, accounting and other tasks. In franchising, entrepreneurs buy into existing concepts and follow strict guidelines for operation in exchange for a fee and royalty payments on sales.
immigrants  franchising  Second_Acts  fast-food  New_York_City  owners  restaurants  Brooklyn  nursing  Caribbean 
november 2011 by jerryking
Immigration undergoes a sea change - The Globe and Mail
CHRYSTIA FREELAND | Columnist profile
From Friday's Globe and Mail
Oct. 06, 2011

In the age of the Internet, the jet plane and the multinational company, the concepts of immigration, citizenship and even statehood are changing.
Chrystia_Freeland  Diaspora  immigration  immigrants  citizenship 
october 2011 by jerryking
The chambermaid’s ordeal never ends - The Globe and Mail
LYSIANE GAGNON | Columnist profile | E-mail
From Monday's Globe and Mail
Published Monday, May. 30, 2011
sexual_assault  Dominique_Strauss-Kahn  New_York_City  Guinea  immigrants  Muslim  chambermaids 
may 2011 by jerryking
Galleon Chief’s Web of Friends Proved Crucial to Scheme
MAY 11, 2011| NYT | by PETER LATTMAN AND AZAM AHMED. What made
Rajaratnam stand out was not his proprietary computer models nor his
skills in security analysis. Instead, colleagues marveled at the deep
set of contacts he had cultivated inside Silicon Valley executive suites
and on Wall Street trading floors.

Many of Mr. Rajaratnam’s tipsters came from the South Asian immigrant
community, a relatively small group of Indians, Pakistanis and Sri
Lankans who over the past several decades have made their mark in
finance and technology. ... .All these contacts formed the core of
Rajaratnam’s vast information network. From his office on Madison
Avenue, Rajaratnam collected data about technology companies and then
swapped it with sources across the globe. He spoke of getting an edge to
beat the stock market, and for Mr. Rajaratnam, that edge was
information.
insider_trading  hedge_funds  slight_edge  South_Asia  social_networking  immigrants  ethnic_communities  Raj_Rajaratnam 
may 2011 by jerryking
Kraft calls on star chefs to capture immigrant market - The Globe and Mail
Apr. 12, 2011 |G&M | WENCY LEUNG. Major North American food
companies have been expanding their overseas mkts. for decades. But
targeting ethnic consumers on home turf is still relatively uncharted
territory. Industry analysts say that’s changing, as shifting
demographics in Canada force mainstream food companies to recognize new
growth opportunities among domestic minority groups. Last yr, Campbell
Canada launched a new line of halal-certified soups to cater to a
growing population of Muslim Canadians. This past February, the
country’s largest grocer, Loblaw, appointed a new president with
extensive knowledge of Asian markets. Following Loblaw’s 2009 purchase
of Asian supermarket chain T&T, the company’s appointment of Vicente
Trius as president underscores its intention to attract diverse
customers.As Loblaw exec. chair. Galen Weston said at the appointment,
Mr. Trius “has an understanding of Asian retail, South Asian retail and
what constitutes a great way to grab those customers.”
Kraft  ethnic_communities  immigrants  Loblaws  demographic_changes  uncharted_problems  food  retailers  product_launches  chefs 
april 2011 by jerryking
black like them
April 29, 1996 | gladwell dot com | Malcolm Gladwell
Malcolm_Gladwell  African-Americans  Caribbean  migrants  culture  attitudes  immigrants 
march 2011 by jerryking
America's Edge: Power in the Networked Century
Jan/Feb 2009 | Foreign Affairs | Anne-Marie Slaughter. The
power that flows from networked connectivity is not the power to impose
outcomes. Netwks are not directed & controlled as much as they are
managed & orchestrated. Multiple players are integrated into a whole
greater than the sum of its parts--an orchestra that plays differently
according to the vision of its conductor & talent of individual
musicians. ...Most important, netwk. power flows from the ability to
make the maximum number of valuable connections. The next requirement is
to have the knowledge & skills to harness that power to achieve a
common purpose.... If, in a networked world, measure of a state's power
is its ability to turn connectivity into innovation and growth... Thanks
to demography, geography, and culture, the 21st century looks
increasingly like an “Americas” century.
ProQuest  globalization  immigrants  21st._century  networks  network_power  heterogeneity  Communicating_&_Connecting  power  influence  orchestration  Anne-Marie_Slaughter 
january 2011 by jerryking
Book Review - Disintegration - By Eugene Robinson - NYTimes.com
By RAYMOND ARSENAULT
Published: December 29, 2010

During the past four decades, Robinson persuasively argues, black
America has splintered into four subgroups: the Transcendent elite; the
Mainstream middle class, which now accounts for a majority of black
Americans; an Emergent community made up of mixed-race families and
black immigrants from Africa and the Caribbean; and the Abandoned, a
large and growing underclass concentrated in the inner cities and
depressed pockets of the rural South.

Divided by economics and culture, these four groups have little in
common and little reason to identify with one another.
African-Americans  book_reviews  crisis  disintegration  social_classes  race  the_South  underclass  urban  immigrants  books 
january 2011 by jerryking
Review & Outlook: A Nation in Motion
DECEMBER 22, 2010 | WSJ.com. The Census is in. There are now
308.74 million Americans, an increase of 27 million, or 9.7%, since
2000. Americans are still multiplying, one of the best indicators that
the country's prospects remain strong.
About 13 million of that increase were new immigrants. These newcomers
brought energy, talent, entrepreneurial skills and a work ethic. Their
continued arrival in such large numbers validates that the rest of the
world continues to view the U.S. as a land of freedom and opportunity.
The Census figures also confirm that America is a nation in constant
motion, with tens of millions hopping across state lines and changing
residence since 2000. And more of them are moving into conservative,
market-friendly red states than into progressive, public-sector heavy
blue states. In order the 10 states with the greatest population gains
were Nevada, Arizona, Utah, Idaho, Texas, North Carolina, Georgia,
Florida, Colorado and South Carolina.
census  population_trends  internal_migration  work_ethic  immigrants  immigration  North_Carolina 
december 2010 by jerryking
Put out the welcome sign for immigrants
Nov 3, 2010 / Financial Times pg. 14 / Luke Johnson. Importing
human capital generates wealth. They bring ideas - and often financial capital - and force us to raise our game to compete. Throughout history, those who would expel or persecute industrious communities - like Nazi Germany and the Jews, Idi Amin's Uganda and Asians - have been the big
losers. What we need is brainpower and willpower - they are the greatest
natural resources. Migrants are a self-selecting minority and tend to
be young and enterprising. We should continue to make our country
attractive to arrivals from all over the world who want to start a
business.
Luke_Johnson  human_capital  wealth_creation  migrants  immigrants  immigration  ethnic_communities  willpower  expulsions  persecution  Uganda  Idi_Amin  brainpower  South_Asians  natural_resources  self-selecting  displacement  dislocations  adversity 
november 2010 by jerryking
Toronto’s angry (non-white)voters
Oct. 27, 2010 | Nat. Post | Editorial. Mr. Ford’s victory
represents more than just a backlash against busybody govt. & big
spending: It represents a potential right-turn in the voting patterns of
Canada’s immigrant communities.
Notwithstanding what Ford’s opponents & their Toronto Star echo
chamber wanted voters to believe, white men aren’t the only Torontonians
in an angry mood: 47% of voters marked the ballot for a candidate who
promised to “stop the gravy train”...Most newcomers don’t dwell on
making Toronto “inclusive,” or alternative art exhibits or publicly
funded ethnic festivals. They are busy working long hrs. to feed their
children & put a roof over their heads. They don’t sympathize with
“fair wage” policies that pay inflated prices to keep unions happy, at
the expense of taxpayers who get by on mkt. wages. You only had to walk
through Ford’s victory party— as one editorial board member did on
Monday night — to see how the city’s electoral allegiances are changing.
Rob_Ford  mayoral  Toronto  diversity  immigrants  voting  ethnic_communities  editorials  echo_chambers  white_men 
october 2010 by jerryking
Capitalize on immigrants' promise
Sep 15, 2004 | G & M pg. A.19|Dominic D'Alessandro. Not
recognizing newcomers' learning & credentials costs our economy as
much as $5B annually. Canada needs to do a better job integrating
skilled immigrants into the work force. Here are 6 recommendations: (1)
Revise Canada's settlement policy to include programs that help
immigrants enter the labour mkt. at an appropriate level.(2) Work with
immigrants overseas so they can better prepare themselves & hit the
ground running on arrival in Canada.(3) Update & expand language
training programs in order to meet the needs of industry & the new
profile of skilled immigrants.(4) Expand successful labour-mkt.
integration programs, e.g. internships & mentoring, by working with
employers & other partners;(5) Recognize the special role of
Canada's largest metro areas as key partners in immigrant settlement.(6)
Develop regional strategies, in collaboration with provincial, regional
& municipal govts. to expedite the labour-mkt. integration.
ProQuest  immigrants  accreditation  recommendations  social_integration  Dominic_D'Alessandro  TRIEC  internships  training_programs 
october 2010 by jerryking
How slums can save the world
Sept. 25, 2010 | The Globe & Mail | Doug Saunders.
Thorncliffe Park, despite having the outward trappings (family incomes
average $20K and the poverty rate est. @ 44 %) of an ethnic ghetto, is,
and has always served as a highly successful engine of economic &
social integration, churning people out as fast as it takes them in,
constantly renewing itself with fresh arrivals. Unlike nearby Flemingdon
Park which remains isolated and violence-plagued. In neglected
neighbourhoods, people are poor because they are trapped. In a thriving
arrival city/spring-board/ or gateway communities like Thorncliffe Park,
they are moving onward--the trick being to look not at the wealth of
the residents, but at their trajectories.
Doug_Saunders  immigrants  arrival_cities  social_integration  Thorncliffe_Park  Toronto  migrants  urban  Flemingdon_Park  isolated  violence  poverty  geographic_segregation 
september 2010 by jerryking
The Kids Will Be Alright - WSJ.com
JANUARY 23, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By JOEL KOTKIN.
The coming U.S. population boom will bring new economic vitality; the
resurgence of Fargo..." Entrepreneurialism and America's flexible
business culture—including the harnessing of entrepreneurial skills of
aging boomers—will prove critical to meeting this challenge. Many of the
individuals starting new firms will be those who have recently left or
been laid off by bigger companies, particularly during a severe economic
downturn. Whether they form a new bank, energy company or design firm,
they will do it more efficiently—with less overhead, more efficient use
of the Internet and less emphasis on pretentious office settings.
"....What drives immigrants is their optimism in America's future.
Joel_Kotkin  population_growth  U.S.  entrepreneurship  immigrants  optimism  aging  baby_boomers 
august 2010 by jerryking
Dollarama aims to keep it simple
Aug. 11, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Marina Strauss Retailing Reporter
Marina_Strauss  retailers  Dollarama  immigrants  cost-consciousness  low-income 
august 2010 by jerryking
Volunteers build networks - and make a difference
September 24, 2009 | The Globe and Mail | CHERYL DEVOE KIM.
Forging connections in the community can have a big impact on skill
development, morale and team building
volunteering  networking  community  immigrants 
may 2010 by jerryking
Op-Ed Columnist - Just Doing It - NYTimes.com
April 17, 2010 | New York Times | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN.
EndoStim was inspired by Cuban and Indian immigrants to America and
funded by St. Louis venture capitalists. Its prototype is being
manufactured in Uruguay, with the help of Israeli engineers and constant
feedback from doctors in India and Chile. Oh, and the C.E.O. is a South
African, who was educated at the Sorbonne, but lives in Missouri and
California, and his head office is basically a BlackBerry....Chris
Anderson of Wired Magazine pointed this out in a smart essay in
February’s issue, entitled “Atoms Are the New Bits.”
innovation  Tom_Friedman  medical_devices  start_ups  entrepreneurship  Chris_Anderson  Uruguay  venture_capital  vc  immigrants  supply_chains  globalization  lean  small_business  microproducers  cosmopolitan  atoms_&_bits 
april 2010 by jerryking
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