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jerryking : incarceration   34

A Warrant to Search Your Vagina - The New York Times
By ANDREA J. RITCHIEJULY 21, 2017
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police_misconduct  incarceration  women  African-Americans 
july 2017 by jerryking
Those who focus on police reform are asking the wrong questions - The Globe and Mail
AMANDA ALEXANDER
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jul. 29, 2016

The deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile underscore two truths about the United States: We make it difficult for people to get by and harder yet to care for each other. After decades of slashing welfare budgets and increasing investments in prisons, federal and state governments have charted a path for the country’s poorest: aggressive policing and incarceration. We’ve locked people out of the formal job market and criminalized their survival.

It is not coincidental that officers in New York and Baton Rouge killed Eric Garner and Alton Sterling, respectively, in the course of policing informal economies (selling loose cigarettes and CDs). We simply make life hard for people – until we extinguish it entirely....Each day, we require black people to risk their lives to be cafeteria workers, teachers, therapists. The United States demands impossible sacrifices from black people to sustain its economy, and has since slavery.

What does this have to do with police reform?

Very little. Reformers are asking the wrong questions. They have turned to increased police training and altered use-of-force protocols to end this nightmare. Fortunately, some among us demand another way. Young black activists are not just asking, “How do we make cops stop shooting us?” but instead, “What do our communities need to thrive? How do we get free?” They’re not begging for scraps; they’re demanding the world they deserve. If there’s a future for any of us, it’s in asking these questions, demanding fundamental shifts in resources and organizing like hell.....Meanwhile, cash-strapped cities continue to raise revenue from policing and fining the poor. And because of insufficient social service investment, Americans rely on police to be first responders to crises of mental health, addiction and homelessness.
policing  African-Americans  reform  informal_economy  mental_health  addictions  existential  foundational  homelessness  community_organizing  incarceration  institutional_path_dependency  structural_change  questions  Black_Lives_Matter  cash-strapped  cities  reframing  political_organizing 
july 2016 by jerryking
The Danger of a Single Story - The New York Times
David Brooks APRIL 19, 2016

American politics has always been prone to single storyism — candidates reducing complex issues to simple fables. This year the problem is acute because Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders are the giants of Single Storyism. They reduce pretty much all issues to the same single story: the alien invader story....As in life generally, every policy has the vices of its virtues. Aggressive policing cuts crime but increases brutality. There is no escape from trade-offs and tragic situations. The only way forward is to elect people who are capable of holding opposing stories in their heads at the same time, and to reject those who can’t....As F. Scott Fitzgerald once said, “The test of a first-rate mind is the ability to hold two diametrically opposed ideas in your head at the same time.”"
David_Brooks  storytelling  public_policy  single_action_bias  critical_thinking  history  philosophy  skepticism  tradeoffs  oversimplification  criminal_justice_system  incarceration  narratives  dual-consciousness  F._Scott_Fitzgerald 
april 2016 by jerryking
Retired Wells Fargo Exec to Help Ex-Convicts - Barron's
By ED FINN
August 1, 2015

As Ludeman sees it, life in Ferguson and many other impoverished U.S. cities has been made far worse by the inability of ex-convicts to adjust to life outside prison. Of the people released from prison, an astounding 77% end up getting arrested again within five years. ...Ludeman was quick to educate himself on the social and economic costs of America’s burgeoning state and federal prison population, which now numbers 1.6 million, up from 300,000 in 1980. One reason the U.S. economy has been slow to recover in recent years is that so many Americans have prison records and therefore find it nearly impossible to get jobs. This is largely due to laws passed since 1980 requiring mandatory sentences, particularly for drug-related offenses. By one estimate, 7.7 million people in the U.S. have served time in prison.

Before thinking about Project Cope, says Ludeman, “I did not realize the devastating impact to individuals, families, and communities, who are literally annihilated by mass incarceration.”

Without question, the harsher sentencing laws of the past three decades have taken a proportionately greater toll on African-Americans. While African-Americans make up 13% of the overall U.S. population, they account for 38% of prison inmates. Studies have shown that when a white person and an African-American with similar criminal histories are charged with the same type of crime, the chances of the African-American going to prison are far higher than for the white defendant. One study indicated that young African-American males have a one-in-three chance of going to prison at some point in their lives, versus one-in-six for Hispanics and one-in-17 for whites
Second_Acts  nonprofit  CEOs  leadership  serving_others  justice_system  penal_institutions  prisons  incarceration  racial_disparities  African-Americans 
august 2015 by jerryking
Forcing Black Men Out of Society - NYTimes.com
Devah Pager

This astounding shortfall in black men translates into lower marriage rates, more out-of-wedlock births, a greater risk of poverty for families and, by extension, less stable communities. The missing men should be a source of concern to political leaders and policy makers everywhere.

While the 1.5 million number is startling, it actually understates the severity of the crisis that has befallen African-American men since the collapse of the manufacturing and industrial centers, which was quickly followed by the “war on drugs” and mass imprisonment, which drove up the national prison population more than sevenfold beginning in the 1970s.

In addition to the “missing,” millions more are shut out of society, or are functionally missing, because of the shrinking labor market for low-skilled workers, racial discrimination or sanctions that prevent millions who have criminal convictions from getting all kinds of jobs. At the same time, the surge in imprisonment has further stigmatized blackness itself, so that black men and boys who have never been near a jail now have to fight the presumption of criminality in many aspects of day-to-day life — in encounters with police, in schools, on the streets and on the job....William Julius Wilson wrote in his 1996 book, “When Work Disappears,” for the first time in the 20th century, most adults in many poor inner-city neighborhoods were not working.... Devah Pager wrote in her book, “Marked: Race, Crime and Finding Work in an Era of Mass Incarceration.”
understated  African-Americans  men  criminality  incarceration  racial_disparities  racial_discrimination  books  stereotypes  children  deindustrialization  war_on_drugs  stigmatization  family_breakdown  instability  unemployment  mass_incarceration  joblessness  William_Julius_Wilson  blackness  presumptions 
april 2015 by jerryking
Obama Gives Emotional Farewell Speech at Holder Event
Feb 27, 2015 | WSJ | By BYRON TAUand ANDREW GROSSMAN.

Mr. Obama pointed to “hundreds of terrorism convictions, the largest mafia take down in history, billion dollar financial fraud cases, long overdue reforms to our criminal justice system” as just some of Mr. Holder’s accomplishments in office.

“Thanks in part to Eric’s leadership, the overall crime rate and overall incarceration rate declined together for the first time in 40 years,” the president said. He also identified the Justice Department’s focus on civil rights, voting rights, hate crimes and human trafficking as notable areas of accomplishment.
Obama  Eric_Holder  Aretha_Franklin  Department_of_Justice  exits  incarceration  decline 
february 2015 by jerryking
Brothers declared innocent of rape and murder, go free after 30 years - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL BIESECKER
RALEIGH, N.C. — The Associated Press
Published Wednesday, Sep. 03 2014,
incarceration  innocence 
september 2014 by jerryking
How Dr. King Shaped My Work in Economics - NYTimes.com
August 27, 2013| NYT | By JOSEPH E. STIGLITZ.

The battle against outright discrimination is, regrettably far from over: 50 years after the march, and 45 years after the passage of the Fair Housing Act, major United States banks, like Wells Fargo, still discriminate on the basis of race, targeting the most vulnerable of our citizens for their predatory lending activities. Discrimination in the job market is pervasive and deep. Research suggests that applicants with African-American sounding names get fewer calls for interviews. Discrimination takes new forms; racial profiling remains rampant in many American cities, including through the stop-and-frisk policies that became standard practice in New York. Our incarceration rate is the world’s highest, although there are signs, finally, that fiscally strapped states are starting to see the folly, if not the inhumanity, of wasting so much human capital through mass incarceration. Almost 40 percent of prisoners are black. This tragedy has been documented powerfully by Michelle Alexander and other legal scholars.
African-Americans  books  economics  economists  fallacies_follies  Fair_Housing_Act  human_capital  incarceration  Joseph_Stiglitz  mass_incarceration  MLK  predatory_practices  racial_discrimination  racial_disparities  social_justice 
august 2013 by jerryking
Imprisoned by Innovation - NYTimes.com
By EVGENY MOROZOV
Published: March 23, 2013

“Imagine a virtual incarceration system,” the report’s authors write, “that uses advanced risk modeling, geospatial analytics, smartphone technology and principles from the study of human behavior to achieve superior outcomes.”

Such gizmos are meant to reduce overcrowding and help manage the spiraling costs of incarceration by allowing offenders to serve their sentences at home. Thanks to the almighty smartphone, offenders can be under the constant gaze of case managers, who will monitor their activities in real time.
incarceration  massive_data_sets  human_behavior  innovation  gamification  disruption  prisons  geospatial 
march 2013 by jerryking
Murder Spike Poses Quandary - WSJ.com
May 6, 2008 | WSJ | By GARY FIELDS.

Murder Spike Poses Quandary
Criminologists Offer Varied Explanations For April's Increase in Some Cities

What is most troubling to people who study crime is that there is no simple explanation for this rise. There are the usual reasons -- the economy, poverty, gangs and crews, and the availability of firearms, but there is one that has been little explored: the migration of the prison culture back to the streets. As nearly 700,000 convicts a year return home, some may be bringing prison culture with them.

"This is part of the price we're paying for 20 years of mass incarceration,"...violence also turns on a central currency within prisons: respect. Disrespect can lead to lethal responses at the slightest provocation....while the overall murder rate has dropped for years, it has been inching up in the black community in recent years. African-Americans make up only 13% of the nation's population, but more are killed in the U.S. than any other racial group, accounting for 49% of all murder victims, according to Federal Bureau of Investigation statistics...."The homicides occur in neighborhoods where folks don't finish high school," Mr. Owens said. "If you can't make the transition from learning to read to reading to learn, you're done."
killings  criminality  African-Americans  violence  incarceration  mass_incarceration  disrespect  prisons  murders 
february 2013 by jerryking
Rajat Gupta, Ex-Goldman Director, to Serve 2 Years in Trading Case - NYTimes.com
October 24, 2012, 4:17 pm96 Comments
Ex-Goldman Director to Serve 2 Years in Prison on Insider Trading Case
By PETER LATTMAN
Rajat_Gupta  McKinsey  incarceration  sentencing  sentencing_guidelines  insider_trading 
october 2012 by jerryking
Goldman Sachs to Help Fund NYC Program to Cut Jail Recidivism
Aug 2, 2012 | Bloomberg | By Henry Goldman.

New York City will try to reduce the recidivism of young male convicts housed on Rikers Island with a four-year program run by nonprofits and financed by Goldman Sachs Group Inc. (GS)

The bank will invest $9.6 million through a so-called social-impact bond, meaning it will profit only if the plan achieves its goals. New York officials said the program is the first of its kind in the U.S.

“In this new model, private investors fund the intervention through a nonprofit contractor and the government pays the contractor only if the program meets its goals,” Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s office said in a news release.

For Goldman Sachs to earn a profit, the program will need to reduce recidivism by at least 10 percent. City payments to MDRC, a nonprofit social-policy group created by the Ford Foundation that will monitor and run the program, also will be based on its degree of success. The Vera Institute of Justice will independently assess the program’s effectiveness, the mayor’s office said.
Goldman_Sachs  New_York_City  recidivism  incarceration  nonprofit  bonds  Michael_Bloomberg  social_finance  social_impact 
august 2012 by jerryking
12 Things You Must Know to Survive And Thrive in America
January 28, 2002 | Newsweek Magazine | Ellis Cose.
Adapted from "The Envy of the World" by Ellis Cose.
1. Play the race card carefully, and at your own peril.
2. Complain all you like about the raw deal you have gotten in life, but don't expect those complaints to get you anywhere.
3. Expect to do better than the world expects of you; expect to live in a bigger world than the one you see.
4. Don't expect support for your dreams from those who have not accomplished much in their lives.
5. If someone is bringing out your most self-destructive tendencies, acknowledge that that person is not a friend.
6. Don't be too proud to ask for help, particularly from those who are wiser and older.
7. Recognize that being true to yourself is not the same as being true to a stupid stereotype.
8. Don't let the glitter blind you.
9. Don't expect competence and hard work alone to get you the recognition or rewards you deserve.
10. You must seize the time, for it is already later than you think.
11. Even if you have to fake it, show some faith in yourself.
12. Don't force innocent others to bear the price of your pain.
rules_of_the_game  African-Americans  Carpe_diem  self-confidence  incarceration  race  mentoring  books  self-promotion  stereotypes  movingonup  ksfs  affirmations  race_card  asking_for_help  hard_work  self-destructive 
august 2012 by jerryking
Racial equality looks different from behind bars - The Globe and Mail
Jun. 09 2012 | The Globe and Mail | by Doug Saunders.

What if the statistics are wrong? What if, instead of solving its greatest social problem, the United States has quite literally removed the victims of inequality from public records and put them in a box?...All of the data used to measure the social well-being of the country, from the national census on downward, is collected by surveying households. It does not count anyone who is not in a household – that is, who is in military service, in medical institutions or in prison....starting with the hyperbolic sentencing policies of Ronald Reagan, the U.S. prison system expanded at an astonishing rate. Before, prison was for violent and repeat offenders. After the Sentencing Reform Act of 1984 broadened its use, the prison population expanded fivefold....Prison has now supplanted education and welfare as the main social service provided to the disenfranchised. Blacks are seven times more likely than whites to be in prison. It’s self-perpetuating, because imprisonment increases rates of criminality, poverty, educational failure and family breakup.

But Americans do not see these effects. Prisoners don’t appear on the census, the unemployment-rate, educational-attainment records or the voting rolls.

What happens if you include them? That is exactly what Dr. Pettit has done in her new book, Invisible Men: Mass Incarceration and the Myth of Black Progress...There genuinely have been great gains for black Americans with education. But instead of expanding these gains, the United States has used prisons to freeze half the black population out of them. Canada is in danger of doing the same to its native population under new tough-on-crime laws – and as the U.S. example shows, sticking a country’s social problems in a box does not make them go away.
race_relations  African-Americans  statistics  prisons  undercounting  incarceration  Doug_Saunders  books  racial_disparities  mass_incarceration  myths  self-perpetuation 
june 2012 by jerryking
Rajaratnam Faces Longest-Ever Insider Prison Term - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 13, 2011 | WSJ | By CHAD BRAY.

Raj Rajaratnam, the face of the biggest trading scandal in a generation, is expected later this morning to be sentenced to a prison term that could be one of the longest-ever handed down for an insider case.

Enlarge Image
raj1013
raj1013
Associated Press

Raj Rajaratnam

Prosecutors are seeking a sentence of 19 years and seven months to 24 years and five months behind bars during a hearing that is due to begin at 10:30 a.m. Eastern time today. Mr. Rajaratnam's lawyers—citing health problems, among other factors—have been urging the judge to consider a much more lenient sentencing range of 6½ years to 8 years and 1 month.

The one-time hedge-fund titan's prison term could very well exceed 10 years, legal experts said, which was the longest sentence imposed for insider trading in New York in the past two decades.
Inside Information

See some recent and infamous cases involving insider trading.

View Interactive
[SB10001424052970204002304576627021628071738]
Associated Press

Michael Milken arrived at New York State Supreme Court in Manhattan for his arraignment on April 7, 1989.

The 54-year-old co-founder of Galleon Group, who was convicted of five counts of conspiracy and nine counts of insider trading in May, was accused by prosecutors of being at the center of the one of the biggest insider-trading schemes ever unearthed. Mr. Rajaratnam is the highest-profile person to be prosecuted, so far, as part of a broad U.S. government crackdown.
insider_trading  Raj_Rajaratnam  sentencing  incarceration 
october 2011 by jerryking
Running a Business After Doing Time
February 21, 2009 | New York Times | By LESLIE BERLIN

In the past few years, several programs have been introduced to teach
prisoners, who may have problems finding traditional employment after
their release, how to work for themselves.
entrepreneurship  penal_institutions  prisons  incarceration 
march 2009 by jerryking
Amazon.com: Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black ...
Wall Street Journal bureau chief Blackmon gives a
groundbreaking and disturbing account of a sordid chapter in American
history—the lease (essentially the sale) of convicts to commercial
interests between the end of the 19th century and well into the 20th.
19th_century  African-Americans  books  convicts  groundbreaking  incarceration  Jim_Crow  slavery  the_South 
january 2009 by jerryking

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