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Opinion | The Two Codes Your Kids Need to Know
Feb. 12, 2019 | The New York Times | By Thomas L. Friedman, Opinion Columnist.

A few years ago, the leaders of the College Board, the folks who administer the SAT college entrance exam, asked themselves a radical question: Of all the skills and knowledge that we test young people for that we know are correlated with success in college and in life, which is the most important? Their answer: the ability to master “two codes” — computer science and the U.S. Constitution......please show their work: “Why these two codes?”

Answer: if you want to be an empowered citizen in our democracy — able to not only navigate society and its institutions but also to improve and shape them, and not just be shaped by them — you need to know how the code of the U.S. Constitution works. And if you want to be an empowered and adaptive worker or artist or writer or scientist or teacher — and be able to shape the world around you, and not just be shaped by it — you need to know how computers work and how to shape them.....the internet, big data and artificial intelligence now the essential building blocks of almost every industry....mastering the principles and basic coding techniques that drive computers and other devices “will be more prepared for nearly every job,”....“At the same time, the Constitution forms the foundational code that gives shape to America and defines our essential liberties — it is the indispensable guide to our lives as productive citizens.”......“Understanding how government works is the essence of power. To be a strong citizen, you need to know how the structures of our government work and how to operate within them.”
African-Americans  civics  coding  constitutions  education  engaged_citizenry  foundational  high_schools  indispensable  individual_agency  life_skills  op-ed  public_education  questions  SAT  show_your_work  students  Tom_Friedman  women 
february 2019 by jerryking
Boost your sales with tips from Warren Buffett
DECEMBER 18, 2012 | The Globe and Mail | by HARVEY SCHACHTER, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL.

How to Close a Deal Like Warren Buffett
By Tom Searcy and Henry DeVries
(McGraw-Hill, 217 pages, $24.95)

The authors recommend a process they call "the triples" that will help you make the case for your product or service:

Triple 1: The prospect's three problems

First, find out – and write down – the three biggest problems the prospect faces in the area your product or service can help. This aligns you with the buyer's interests.

Triple 2: Your three-part solution

Now think carefully about how you can solve each problem. As you write it out for the client, remember that generic language such as "improved," "better," and "big difference" are not that compelling. Use actual numbers and refer to specific pressure points to focus on the outcomes your prospect can expect.

Triple 3: Your three references

The third step is to identify at least three references you can share who have experienced similar outcomes when using your products and services. This may be sensitive, given confidentiality and competitive issues. But the authors stress: "The most effective way to get the attention of prospects is to drop the names of others just like them."

The authors urge you to become a student of psychology and develop profiles of members of the prospect's team. Try to determine each person's fears, since those qualms may send your pitch into the ditch. Determine each person's point of view about your solution, as well as any other personal trait or event that might be of importance. At the same time, study the team dynamics, from where people sit around the table to who they defer to.

The most dangerous person will be "the eel." The authors insist that "in every deal, and at every prospect's table, there is always an eel – a person who is against the deal. Always. Eels have a tendency to hang out in the shadows. They are hard to get to, and they usually talk you down when you're not around."

Usually eels are driven by fear that they don't want to acknowledge, so instead they insist they are against the deal on principle. They are dangerous, and must be identified early. Then you can try to co-opt them, taking the eel's ideas and baking them into your proposal.
Harvey_Schachter  deal-making  eels  Warren_Buffett  books  tips  salesmanship  pitches  think_threes  solutions  psychology  references  problems  obstacles  management_consulting  JCK  problem_solving  indispensable  enterprise_clients  aligned_interests 
august 2017 by jerryking
America is still great — but it needs to stay strong
May 26, 2016 | The Washington Post | By Fareed Zakaria, Opinion writer.

It is increasingly clear that the U.S. has in recent years reinforced its position as the world’s leading economic, technological, military and political power. The country dominates virtually all leading industries — from social networks to mobile telephony to nano- and biotechnology — like never before......Joshua Cooper Ramo's new book, “The Seventh Sense,” argues that in an age of networks, the winner often takes all. He points out that there are nine global tech platforms (Google Chrome, Microsoft Office, Facebook, etc.) that are used by more than 1 billion people. All dominate their respective markets — and all have their epicenters in America: The dollar is more widely used for international financial transactions today than it was 20 years ago.....A better, broader measure of economic power than GDP, is “inclusive wealth.” This is the sum of a nation’s “manufactured capital (roads, buildings, machines and equipment), human capital (skills, education, health) and natural capital (sub-soil resources, ecosystems, the atmosphere).” The United States’ inclusive wealth totaled almost $144 trillion in 2010 — 4½ times China’s $32 trillion.....China is far behind the United States in its ability to add value to goods and create new products.....In the military and political realm, the dominance is even more lopsided. ....And perhaps most important, the United States has a web of allies around the world and is actually developing new important ones, such as India and Vietnam. Meanwhile, China has one military ally, North Korea....The complexity of today’s international system is that, despite this American dominance, other countries have, in fact, gained ground.......“Washington still has no true rival, and will not for a very long time, but it faces a growing number of constraints.” ....The reality is that America remains the world’s leading power, but it can achieve its objectives only by defining its interests broadly, working with others and creating a network of cooperation. That, alas, does not fit on a campaign cap.
Fareed_Zakaria  Donald_Trump  networks  epicenters  winner-take-all  superpowers  indispensable  Joshua_Cooper_Ramo  platforms  books  international_system  manufactured_capital  human_capital  natural_capital 
may 2016 by jerryking
The new game | The Economist
Oct 17th 2015 |

America still has resources other powers lack. Foremost is its web of alliances, including NATO. Whereas Mr Obama sometimes behaves as if alliances are transactional, they need solid foundations. America’s military power is unmatched, but it is hindered by pork-barrel politics and automatic cuts mandated by Congress. These spring from the biggest brake on American leadership: dysfunctional politics in Washington. That is not just a poor advertisement for democracy; it also stymies America’s interest. In the new game it is something that the United States—and the world—can ill afford.
U.S.foreign_policy  politics  China  Russia  gridlocked_politics  network_density  Vladimir_Putin  Syria  Asia_Pacific  South_China_Sea  networks  power  NATO  influence  superpowers  indispensable  international_system  transactional_relationships  alliances  Obama 
october 2015 by jerryking
What to Learn in College to Stay One Step Ahead of Computers - NYTimes.com
MAY 22, 2015 | NYT | By ROBERT J. SHILLER.

The successful occupations, by this measure, shared certain characteristics: People who practiced them needed complex communication skills and expert knowledge. Such skills included an ability to convey “not just information but a particular interpretation of information.” They said that expert knowledge was broad, deep and practical, allowing the solution of “uncharted problems.”

These attributes may not be as beneficial in the future. But the study certainly suggests that a college education needs to be broad and general, and not defined primarily by the traditional structure of separate departments staffed by professors who want, most of all, to be at the forefront of their own narrow disciplines.....In a separate May 5 statement, Prof. Sean D. Kelly, chairman of the General Education Review Committee, said a Harvard education should give students “an art of living in the world.”

But how should professors do this? Perhaps we should prepare students for entrepreneurial opportunities suggested by our own disciplines. Even departments entirely divorced from business could do this by suggesting enterprises, nonprofits and activities in which students can later use their specialized knowledge....I continue to update the course, thinking about how I can integrate its lessons into an “art of living in the world.” I have tried to enhance my students’ sense that finance should be the art of financing important human activities, of getting people (and robots someday) working together to accomplish things that we really want done.
Robert_Shiller  Yale  Harvard  college-educated  education  students  automation  machine_learning  Colleges_&_Universities  finance  continuing_education  continuous_learning  Communicating_&_Connecting  indispensable  skills  Managing_Your_Career  21st._century  new_graduates  interdisciplinary  curriculum  entrepreneurship  syllabus  interpretation  expertise  uncharted_problems 
may 2015 by jerryking
Skills in Flux - NYTimes.com
MARCH 17, 2015| NYT |David Brooks.

As the economy changes, the skills required to thrive in it change, too, and it takes a while before these new skills are defined and acknowledged.

For example, in today’s loosely networked world, people with social courage have amazing value. Everyone goes to conferences and meets people, but some people invite six people to lunch afterward and follow up with four carefully tended friendships forevermore. Then they spend their lives connecting people across networks.

People with social courage are extroverted in issuing invitations but introverted in conversation — willing to listen 70 percent of the time.
David_Brooks  skills  networking  social_courage  Communicating_&_Connecting  conferences  sense-making  indispensable  Managing_Your_Career  21st._century  new_graduates  following_up 
march 2015 by jerryking
Eight ways to become the most proactive person you know - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL MOGILL
Young Entrepreneur Council
Published Tuesday, Dec. 09 2014

It’s all about you. No one else is going to get you where you want to go – it’s up to you.... Take ownership of your problems, and realize that nobody else is going to solve them for you.

Be solution-focused. ...The most effective way to handle a problem is to focus on finding a solution. Focusing on things that are out of your control is a waste of time, so focus on what you can control with the final outcome.

Be accountable. Set your clearly defined, quantifiable goal and then work backwards from that goal to establish metrics to track and evaluate it.

Use “SMART” goals. S: Specific (Pick something particular instead of using a broad category.) M: Measurable (Choose something you can quantify.) A: Attainable (You should actually be able to reach this, and it may just require the right steps.) R: Realistic (Be honest – it’s probably unrealistic to say you will go from making $10,000 to being a billionaire in one year.)T: Timely (Give each goal a timeframe to create a sense of urgency.)

Make your own luck. Being successful ... is about taking steps every day to be better than you were the day before by moving in a positive, forward trajectory. Make a blueprint and set out milestones for yourself in specific timeframes, or you are not going to hit your goal. Things do not come to fruition just because you really, really want them to happen. You have to make them happen.

Be consistent. Ultimately, success is not about getting everything right. It is about being consistent. Are you consistently and persistently taking steps every day to steadily move toward your goal?

Find the right people. Surrounding yourself with driven, effective people is a proven way to help you succeed.

Honesty is the best policy. Busywork is not effectiveness/progress. At the end of the day, if you don’t hit your goals, you are only doing a disservice to yourself. You cannot get better if you tell yourself, “Oh, it’s okay, I’m fine where I am.” (There has to be a certain element of sustained dissatisfaction).
accountability  affirmations  beyond_one's_control  blueprints  books  busywork  chance  character_traits  consistency  contingency  dissatisfaction  effectiveness  goal-setting  GTD  honesty  indispensable  intrinsically_motivated  It's_up_to_me  JCK  ksfs  luck  Managing_Your_Career  personal_control  proactivity  problem_solving  productivity  rainmaking  restlessness  self-starters  solutions  solution-finders  span_of_control  the_right_people  thinking_backwards  work-back_schedules 
december 2014 by jerryking
Are we witnessing a comeback of the Stars and Stripes? - The Globe and Mail
JOHN STACKHOUSE
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Sep. 26 2014

America’s retreat was the central question. Had the superpower become a super-bystander? Or had the President just lost interest, energy and credibility to do more than moralize?...Mr. Obama has drawn instead on what he calls “progressive pragmatism,” which his aides claim is his nature, relying on an informal network of networks, ad hoc groups of nations taking on the challenges of the day. Some of them champion liberal values. Some are partners of convenience. Exhibit A: the coalition of willing Arab states in this week’s air strikes. Exhibit B: the network of health agencies and charities operating with U.S. support in ebola-stricken West Africa....On the grander issues of his age – climate change, cyber-security, the financial imbalance between America and Asia – Mr. Obama will need ad hoc networks like never before. The 2008 financial crisis was mitigated by a small group of central bankers, commercial bankers, regulators and finance ministers, supported but not directed by the United States. A president who is not renowned for building private-sector trust, or the loyalty of other nations, may be challenged to do that again. He also needs what America has lacked of late – for its allies to do more. Canada’s approach to carbon emissions is the sort of passive resistance the U.S. has encountered from India on trade, Mexico on immigration and Turkey on Syria. Under Mr. Obama, everyone has loved to complain about Washington, but few have been willing to shoulder their share of the costs.

Skeptics believe this is no longer possible – the world has too many strong voices, too many competing interests, too much of what physicists call entropy, the thermodynamic condition that degenerates order into chaos.
America_in_Decline?  bouncing_back  U.S.foreign_policy  multipolarity  Obama  John_Stackhouse  G20  UN  NATO  Iran  Ukraine  geopolitics  complexity  networks  interconnections  instability  superpowers  indispensable  disequilibriums  ad_hoc  nobystanders  entropy  imbalances 
september 2014 by jerryking
Want to land a big client? Here are four important tips - The Globe and Mail
MATTHIJS KEIJ
Young Entrepreneur Council
Published Tuesday, Aug. 12 2014

Study them

Landing a big client isn’t about you. Let me say that again: It is not about you.... remember that to succeed, you must help your client succeed. How do you do that? Study everything you can about the client until you fully understand the business, strategies and objectives.

Next, clearly define how your product or service will help the company achieve its goals. If you can identify a problem or isolate areas for improvement, then you can clearly illustrate your ability to provide a unique solution.

Make the connection. to land that enterprise client, try to identify your Norgay or Hillary. Talking to the wrong people wastes valuable time. However, if you can create a relationship with a strategic partner, that person can help get you in front of the right people and into the necessary meetings – all the more quickly than you could do on your own. Your target client is Mount Everest. Start climbing.
Gain influence

“An enterprise client needs to be convinced that working with your company is the best decision they could ever make,” says Karthik Manimozh, president and COO of 1-Page. “One of the most effective ways to help them arrive at this conclusion is to let your reputation precede you.”

The leadership, prestige and visibility that your company wields in the marketplace are all key factors that influence buying decisions. The answers your potential enterprise client seeks rest on your ability to shape your story. Good PR and marketing is the foundation. Strategic networking and social proof are pillars.

Remember, influence is something that comes with hard work...Be everywhere; talk with everyone (but ensure your conversations are informative and upbeat, never desperate).

Persevere through tough times

It can take months or even more than a year to land an enterprise client. Nothing worth having comes easy.

During that time, you’re bound to find yourself in countless meetings, possibly caught up in the middle of office politics, or jumping through hoops as the legal and procurement departments vet your company. Don’t dismay. This is par for the course when trying to land an enterprise client.
solutions  solution-finders  marketing  business_development  tips  indispensable  influence  networking  JCK  due_diligence  large_companies  perseverance  Communicating_&_Connecting  value_propositions  serving_others  strategic_thinking  client_development  hard_work  enterprise_clients  hard_times  office_politics  Michael_McDerment  the_right_people 
august 2014 by jerryking
What Machines Can’t Do - NYTimes.com
FEB. 3, 2014 | NYT | David Brooks.
here is what robots can't do -- create art, deep meaning, move our souls, help us to understand and thus operate in the world, inspire deeper thought, care for one another, help the environment where we live
========================================================================
We’re clearly heading into an age of brilliant technology.computers are increasingly going to be able to perform important parts of even mostly cognitive jobs, like picking stocks, diagnosing diseases and granting parole.

As this happens, certain mental skills will become less valuable because computers will take over (e.g. memorization)

what human skills will be more valuable? The age of brilliant machines seems to reward a few traits. First, it rewards enthusiasm, people driven to perform extended bouts of concentration, diving into and trying to make sense of these bottomless information oceans. Second, the era seems to reward people with extended time horizons and strategic discipline. Third, the age seems to reward procedural architects (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia, etc. , people who can design an architecture/platform that allows other people to express ideas or to collaborate. Fourth, people who can organize a decentralized network around a clear question, without letting it dissipate or clump, will have enormous value. Fifth, essentialists will probably be rewarded--the ability to grasp the essence of one thing, and then the essence of some very different thing, and smash them together to create some entirely new thing. Sixth, the computer is the computer. The role of the human is not to be dispassionate, depersonalized or neutral. It is precisely the emotive traits that are rewarded: the voracious lust for understanding, the enthusiasm for work, the ability to grasp the gist, the empathetic sensitivity to what will attract attention and linger in the mind. Unable to compete when it comes to calculation, the best workers will come with heart in hand.
David_Brooks  time_horizons  Erik_Brynjolfsson  career_paths  MIT  problem_solving  persuasion  Andrew_McAfee  Communicating_&_Connecting  indispensable  skills  Managing_Your_Career  21st._century  new_graduates  focus  long-term  self-discipline  lateral_thinking  sense-making  platforms  emotions  empathy 
february 2014 by jerryking
Hard Things You Need To Do To Be Successful - Business Insider
Jan. 14, 2014

You have to make the call you're afraid to make.
You have to get up earlier than you want to get up.
You have to give more than you get in return right away.
You have to care more about others than they care about you.
You have to fight when you are already injured, bloody, and sore.
You have to feel unsure and insecure when playing it safe seems smarter.
You have to lead when no one else is following you yet.
You have to invest in yourself even though no one else is.
You have to look like a fool while you're looking for answers you don't have.
You have to grind out the details when it's easier to shrug them off.
You have to deliver results when making excuses is an option.
You have to search for your own explanations even when you're told to accept the "facts."
You have to make mistakes and look like an idiot.
You have to try and fail and try again.
You have to run faster even though you're out of breath.
You have to be kind to people who have been cruel to you.
You have to meet deadlines that are unreasonable and deliver results that are unparalleled.
You have to be accountable for your actions even when things go wrong.
You have to keep moving towards where you want to be no matter what's in front of you.
You have to do the hard things. The things that no one else is doing. The things that scare you. The things that make you wonder how much longer you can hold on.

Those are the things that define you. Those are the things that make the difference between living a life of mediocrity or outrageous success.

The hard things are the easiest things to avoid. To excuse away. To pretend like they don't apply to you.

The simple truth about how ordinary people accomplish outrageous feats of success is that they do the hard things that smarter, wealthier, more qualified people don't have the courage — or desperation — to do.

Do the hard things. You might be surprised at how amazing you really are.
affirmations  hard_work  hard_truths  howto  indispensable  invest_in_yourself  It's_up_to_me  JCK  ksfs  next_play  playing_it_safe  self-discipline 
january 2014 by jerryking
Rumsfeld's Rules
Rumsfeld's Rules
Wall Street Journal | January 29, 2001 | Donald Rumsfeld
Donald_Rumsfeld  rules_of_the_game  tips  indispensable  Pentagon  SecDef 
january 2014 by jerryking
Why Machiavelli Still Matters - NYTimes.com
By JOHN SCOTT and ROBERT ZARETSKY
Published: December 9, 2013

“The Prince” is a manual for those who wish to win and keep power. The Renaissance was awash in such how-to guides, but Machiavelli’s was different. To be sure, he counsels a prince on how to act toward his enemies, using force and fraud in war. But his true novelty resides in how we should think about our friends. It is at the book’s heart, in the chapter devoted to this issue, that Machiavelli proclaims his originality.

Set aside what you would like to imagine about politics, Machiavelli writes, and instead go straight to the truth of how things really work, or what he calls the “effectual truth.” [Effectual truth means not only that the truth will have an effect, a consequence, but also that its effect will show. Those who try to live by a profession of good will fail and be shown to fail. ] You will see that allies in politics, whether at home or abroad, are not friends....Machiavelli teaches that in a world where so many are not good, you must learn to be able to not be good. The virtues taught in our secular and religious schools are incompatible with the virtues one must practice to safeguard those same institutions. The power of the lion and the cleverness of the fox: These are the qualities a leader must harness to preserve the republic.

For such a leader, allies are friends when it is in their interest to be. (We can, with difficulty, accept this lesson when embodied by a Charles de Gaulle; we have even greater difficulty when it is taught by, say, Hamid Karzai.) What’s more, Machiavelli says, leaders must at times inspire fear not only in their foes but even in their allies — and even in their own ministers.
cynicism  Niccolò_Machiavelli  Medici  indispensable  advice  friendships  politics  power  virtues  interests  consigliere  leaders  self-interest  fear  adaptability  political_power  self-preservation  effectiveness  Charles_de_Gaulle  negative_space  primers 
december 2013 by jerryking
How to develop the mind of a strategist Part 1 of 3 - Google Drive
Apr/May 2001|Communication World. Vol. 18,Iss.3; pg. 13, 3 pgs.| by James E Lukaszewski.

Management wants and needs:

Valuable, useful, applicable advice beyond what the boss already knows

Well-timed, truly significant insights (insight is the ability to
distill wisdom and useful conclusions from contrasting, even seemingly
unrelated, information and facts)

Advance warning, plus options for solving, or at least managing, trouble
or opportunity, and the unintended consequences both often bring

Someone who understands the pattern of events and problems

Supporting evidence through the behavior of their peers

To be strategic, ideas must pass four tough tests: They must help the
boss achieve his/her objectives and goals. They must help the
organization achieve its goals. They must be truly necessary (and pass
the straight face and laugh tests). Without acting on the strategy recommended, some aspect of the business will fail or fail to progress.
strategic_thinking  strategy  public_relations  Communicating_&_Connecting  generating_strategic_options  indispensable  JCK  howto  endgame  wisdom  insights  warning_signs  ambiguities  advice  job_opportunities  job_search  actionable_information  pattern_recognition 
september 2013 by jerryking
Getting Ahead by Having Answers Instead of Questions - NYTimes.com
By

ADAM BRYANT

When I talked to them, I learned that they really wanted to create something in their labs that helps people and the company.

Q. Why wasn’t that happening?

A. I think the disconnect was from a lack of focus on what success was. Success wasn’t around the number of patents you had or how many papers you published. Success needed to be defined as creating products that mattered. One of the ways we did it was by a semantics shift from “R.& D.” to “D.& R.” to show people that while we invest in research, let’s prioritize the development side.

Q. Other career advice?

A. I think most people don’t realize that everybody comes to the C.E.O. with problems. Most people don’t come to tell me good news. The people I rely on or view as high-potential folks are people who come with a problem but also bring ideas for the solution. It may not be the right solution. We may do something entirely different, but they’ve been thoughtful about it.

Earlier in my career, when I went to my C.E.O.’s, I walked in and said, “Here’s the problem and I have two ideas for what we can do.” I never walked in without trying to be thoughtful, and at least two steps ahead. If people are looking to advance their career, they may want to be more thoughtful about bringing some ideas for solving a problem, and not just presenting a problem.

Published: May 27, 2013
CEOs  Bausch_&_Lomb  indispensable  problem_solving  questions  movingonup  overachievers  high-achieving  solutions  solution-finders 
may 2013 by jerryking
Amazing Career Advice For College Grads From LinkedIn's Billionaire Founder - Business Insider
1. Competition.
What should I do with my Life? is the WRONG question--it's too self-absorbed. Instead, make it about everyone else, which means isolating your competitive advantage (assets, aspirations, market realities). In terms of making a positive difference in the world, ask "how can I help?"
2. Networks
Proactively build your network.Relationships matter as people control access to resources, opportunities and information. It's likely that someone I already know knows someone who could help me.
3. Risk
Actions, not plans generate useful lessons. Playing it safe is one of the riskiest things you can do--learn to take Intelligent Risks. Prioritize plans that offer the best chance at learning about yourself and the world. If the worst case scenario is losing a bit of time or money or experiencing some discomfort, this is a worthwhile risk. if the worst case scenario is the serious tarnishing of one's reputation, loss of all economic assets, or something otherwise career ending, don't accept that risk. The best opportunities can be the one with the most question marks.
advice  Managing_Your_Career  Reid_Hoffman  LinkedIn  career_ending_moves  entrepreneurship  indispensable  serving_others  Colleges_&_Universities  students  new_graduates  job_search  discomforts  action-oriented  self-absorbed  playing_it_safe 
may 2013 by jerryking
Learn 'Languages' And You'll Always Land on Your Feet - WSJ.com
October 21, 1997|WSJ | By HAL LANCASTER.

Lesson 1: Learn as many "languages" as possible. Through all this, he learned the value of being a business linguist. He spoke fluent finance, law, investor relations, marketing and brand management.

"It helps your credibility when you can speak the language of other functions," he says.

Lesson 2: Build bridges to other functions.

During his six years at Allied, Mr. Simon had to deal with issues involving the company's toxic-waste cleanups. "We had all these Superfund sites and I had to learn about every one of them," he says.

So he sought out experts in other departments. "I worked a lot with people in strategic planning," he says.

He believed all areas of corporate communications -- media, investor, employee, community -- should be unified, so he spurned job offers that would pigeonhole him and sought training that would broaden him.

Lesson 3: Sometimes you've got to go down to move up.

In 1987, Mr. Simon joined Inspiration Resources, a mining company looking to create a combined media and investor-relations department. "I traded way down in size, but it was a chance to develop more broadly," he says. "It's easier to be a Goliath, but you learn a lot more with the Davids."

Lesson 4: Differentiate yourself by articulating your own philosophy.

When headhunters called, Mr. Simon would discuss the needs of the job, and often recommend someone for the post, even if he wasn't interested himself.

Lesson 5: Don't freeze in the midst of chaos -- act.

Within a year, the banking company was acquired by Fleet Bank and many Natwest people "gave up," Mr. Simon says. But he prepared a three-page summary on public-relations issues confronting the combined banks and requested a meeting with Fleet's vice chairman. The result: He was invited to join the integration team and his employment was extended a year.
next_play  Hal_Lancaster  Managing_Your_Career  indispensable  lessons_learned  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  rules_of_the_game  advice  crisis_management  contingency_planning  first_movers  crisis  chaos  stress_response  immobilize  paralyze  bridge-builders  action-oriented  post-deal_integration  creating_valuable_content 
december 2012 by jerryking
Being an Effective Boss Means 'Managing Up' Within Organizations - WSJ.com
February 20, 2001 | WSJ | by CAROL HYMOWITZ.

Managers who focus exclusively on underlings and forget about the person they report to are likely to limit not only their success but that of their employees...Stellar leaders know the importance of communicating up, down and across organizations and are adept at figuring out what the boss needs and wants..."Managing up well isn't about jumping up and down and saying, 'Look at all the wonderful things I've done.' It's about understanding your boss's and boss's boss's priorities so you can focus your staff on delivering those objectives and also help move your company forward. People who do this are the linchpins of their companies....there is a big difference between bragging about oneself to bosses and gaining recognition for employees....when assigned a new boss, try to determine exactly what method of communication (i.e. frequency, style) he or she prefers..."Managers owe it to their staffs to tell superiors, 'Here's what my team was able to accomplish,' "
Carol_Hymowitz  managing_up  Managing_Your_Career  leaders  recognition  Communicating_&_Connecting  priorities  linchpins  indispensable 
december 2012 by jerryking
Wealthy client advisor
Nov/Dec 2003 | Journal of Tax Practice Management | by Mike Swaim.

Business owners and high net worth individuals are best served when their advisers provide them with timely and pertinent information.....Be a true advisor, not just an analyst, offer solutions.
financial_advisors  wealth_management  high_net_worth  indispensable  owners  solutions 
august 2012 by jerryking
New Year's Resolution 2002
1. Resolve to stay brutally optimistic.
2. Resolve to identify the most powerful benefit you offer to the people around you and then deliver it. (See below)
3. Resolve to pump up your personal vitality. How do I retain personal vitality?
[Personal vitality measures overall health in four key areas:
Physical
Mental
Emotional
Purpose – INTERESTING! (I believe that having a sense of individual life purpose is absolutely fundamental to personal happiness and contentment ]
4. Resolve to be habitually generous.
5. Resolve to go on a mental diet.
6. Resolve to be a global citizen, fully open to the cultures and influences of others.
7. Resolve to take control of your destiny.
8. Resolve to increase your human connectedness. Network.
9. Resolve to increase your creativity by letting go of the familiar. If innovation is everything, how do I institutionalize it in my personal life? Innovation ==> change strategy ==> succeed because they are subversive. Be a heretic!!!
10. Resolve to be you because others are already taken.

Practice adding value to things--ideas to make things worth more.
Practice adding value to people--what can I do to help my colleagues become more effective?
Practice adding value to myself--what can I do to make myself more valuable today?
inspiration  motivations  fitness  personal_energy  purpose  networking  creative_renewal  indispensable  serving_others  value_creation  resolutions  unconventional_thinking  JCK  affirmations  optimism  authenticity  generosity  Communicating_&_Connecting  subversion 
august 2012 by jerryking
The U.S. Cavalry - WSJ.com
July 2, 2004 | WSJ

Colin Powell has just made a high-profile trip to Sudan to examine at first hand the abominations in Darfur, the western province that is the world's latest killing field.

The Secretary of State's visit also throws a spotlight on another unfortunate global reality. Once again the world is calling on the U.S. to stop a horror that the United Nations and everybody else have failed to act against. The killing of black Muslim tribesmen by government-backed Arab militias has been going on since February of last year. But while the world's moralists are in full cry about the threat of "another Rwanda," no one sees fit to actually do something. No one, that is, except the U.S.

U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan has been raising the alarm about Darfur -- and he also visited there this week -- but not until two weeks ago did the Security Council call for an immediate halt to the fighting. This being the U.N., the resolution was toothless. Permanent members China and France are worried about jeopardizing their business interests in Sudan. Pakistan and Algeria, which hold temporary seats, refuse to impose sanctions on a fellow Muslim nation even as it is engaged in the mass killing of Muslims.
Colin_Powell  Darfur  dysfunction  genocides  indispensable  Sudan  UN 
august 2012 by jerryking
Hillary Clinton’s Last Tour as a Rock-Star Diplomat - NYTimes.com
By STEVEN LEE MYERS
Published: June 27, 2012

rld.

Clinton dismissed this when I asked her about it in an interview in her large office on the seventh floor of the State Department. She started by noting that NATO and the military alliances with Japan and South Korea have been bedrocks of national security through every Republican and Democratic administration since World War II. In “21st-century statecraft,” though, “the general understanding, which cuts across parties, is that the United States can’t solve all of the problems in the world,” she said. “But the problems in the world can’t be solved without the United States. And therefore, we have to husband our resources, among which is this incredibly valuable asset of global leadership, and figure out how we can best deploy it.” She cited the role of the Arab League — once marginal and mostly dysfunctional — in forging international consensus for the intervention in Libya. “The Arab League was not prepared to work with NATO, work with the United States,” she explained of nudging others to the forefront of international action. “But we’ve worked very hard, and I certainly have worked hard, to create an openness to that, and I think it’s in America’s interest.”
diplomacy  U.S.foreign_policy  Hillary_Clinton  indispensable  superpowers  21st._century  statecraft  alliances  NATO 
july 2012 by jerryking
The Young & Restless of Technology Finance
November 1993| The Red Herring | Anthony B. Perkins.

We think that marketing is everything. We try to help our companies figure out what is going to set them apart. We encourage companies to define their biggest risks-up front, work hard to put the risks behind them, and then move forward with very innovative marketing...During the interview process, you see whether entrepreneurs have passion and tenacity. The hardest thing to determine is their ability to stick-to-it. Entrepreneurs need to be very dynamic, wi11ing to adjust. And that's why an important part of our process is checking references, we have to be convinced the entrepreneur has never give up, even when things get tough. In other words, when Plan A work, because Plan A never works, we like to hear entrepreneurs say "That's O.K.,Plan B is on its way. I've twisted this valve and turned this knob and I really think we've figured it out." What we don't like to hear is "Well,it didn't work out...sorry." We also like to see entrepreneurs who are singularly focused on building -great products that fill distinct market needs. We are less interested in people who like nice digs, hype,and PR.

Moritz: ‘We have a very tight on making sure there is a sizable market opportunity in front. of us before we make an investment. We are much more focused on market growth potential and the ability for a company to reach a market successfully and profitably. We have also demonstrated as a firm and individually the ability to get companies off the ground with a small amount of fuel. We like to start wicked infernos with a single match rather than two million gallons of kerosene. This is clearly a differentiated way of getting a company put together. This approach has terrific benefits for the people who start the companies and for all our limited partners. You might say that we have a morbid fascination with our ROI, as opposed no the amount of dollars we put to work. And this is a very different message than you get from a lot of other venture firms.
The: HERRING: How often does a Sequoia partner actually go in and help operate a company?

Moritz: Pierre is the great unsung hero of Cisco Systems. He spent a tremendous amount of time at the company. working behind the scenes helping to make sure the engineering department was designing and getting new products to market. People don't realize the significant contribution Pierre made to Cisco because Don's name is on the hubcaps as the chairman of the company. The ability we have to help operate companies is a useful tool in our arsenal.

The HERRING: Sequoia's image on the streets of Silicon Valley is that you are the Los Angeles Raiders of venture capital--the tough guys who are quicker than the other firms to boot the CEO or pull the financial plug.
Moritz: We are congenitally incapable of pouring good money after bad. Some people. for their own will thrust us into a position to be harbingers of bad new to management, which is all right. But we do not want to continue propping up a company if we think its chances for success have evaporated. We would be wasting our money as individuals and wasting the money of our limited partners. There have been very few instances where we decided to stop funding a company and have regretted it.
The HERRING: What ’s the hardest part of your job?
Moritz: We usually don't make mistakes when it comes to assessing market opportunity. And we are reasonably accurate in predicting how long it will take to bring a product to market. The great imponderable is to judge accurately and predict how well a president is going to be able to run the business. It is easy to mistake the facade for reality
The HERRING: ‘What characteristics does Sequoia look for in a company president?
Moritz: Frugality, competitiveness. confidence, and paranoia.
venture_capital  vc  howto  Kleiner_Perkins  Sequoia  career_paths  Michael_Moritz  no_regrets  endurance  frugality  competitiveness  paranoia  self-confidence  market_sizing  market_windows  team_risk  market_opportunities  ambitions  large_markets  sticktoitiveness  entrepreneur  perseverance  indispensable  Plan_B  off-plan  champions  reference-checking  unknowns  assessments_&_evaluations  opportunities  unsentimental  wishful_thinking  illusions  overambitious 
july 2012 by jerryking
What's Next for Newsmagazines? - WSJ.com
April 4, 2008 | WSJ | By REBECCA DANA.
Fading Publications Try to Reinvent Themselves Yet Again

"Like any managers anywhere, we looked at a revenue picture that could be more thrilling and said, 'How can we accomplish two or three things?,' " Mr. Meacham said in an interview. " 'How can we control costs? How can we have money to rebuild and hire new voices and new reporting talent? And how can we do that in the service of what we've been trying to do with the magazine of the last year-and-a-half, which is make it more serious and try to make ourselves indispensable to the conversation?' "....."My whole view was there's more information out there than any time in human history. What people don't need more of is information," Mr. Stengel said. "They need a guide through the chaos."..."What's happened in the business as a whole is talk is cheap and reporting is expensive," said Newsweek writer Jonathan Alter, a 25-year veteran at the magazine who qualified for the buyout but declined it. But he adds, some of the change in culture is welcome. "In general, the office politics are at a much lower volume than in the past because the old fight of space is different than it was. If there's not room in the magazine for something, you can just do it online," he said.....At a recent speech at Columbia University, Mr. Meacham delivered a blistering response after he asked who reads Newsweek and none of the 100-odd students in attendance raised their hands.

"It's an incredible frustration that I've got some of the most decent, hard-working, honest, passionate, straight-shooting, non-ideological people who just want to tell the damn truth, and how to get this past this image that we're just middlebrow, you know, a magazine that your grandparents get, or something, that's the challenge," Mr. Meacham said. "And I just don't know how to do it, so if you've got any ideas, tell me."
chaos  commoditization_of_information  cost-controls  cost-cutting  curation  indispensable  information_overload  Jon_Meacham  journalists  journalism  magazines  multiple_targets  newsstand_circulation  office_politics  print_journalism  questions  reinvention  talent_acquisition  think_threes 
june 2012 by jerryking
The Rhino Principle
01.30.06 | Forbes.com | Paul Johnson
We can choose to lead quiet lives and get through them without achieving much. But if we want to do the big thing, if we hope to leave a record that will be admired and remembered, we must learn to distinguish between the peripheral and the essential. Then, having clearly established our central objective, we must charge at it again and again until the goal is achieved.

That is what the rhinoceros does. It may not be a model animal in most ways. But it does one thing very well. And that one thing we can learn: Charge!
historians  gtd  indispensable  worthiness  signals  noise  discernment  judgment  thinking_big 
june 2012 by jerryking
"The jobs at the end of the universe."
3 May 2012 |Financial Times |by Douglas Board.

Messrs Brynjolfsson and McAfee suggest that no matter how fast and smart computers become, 6 skills: statistical insight; managing group dynamics; good writing; framing and solving open-ended problems; persuasion; and human nurturing; will always be in demand....three more common quantitative abilities to be valued at senior levels: making the meaning of numbers come alive either visually or in words; a keen sense for when numbers should be an important part of a story yet are missing; and not being bullied by impressive correlations into assuming causality.
Erik_Brynjolfsson  career_paths  MIT  connecting_the_dots  problem_solving  open-ended  persuasion  statistics  Communicating_&_Connecting  indispensable  storytelling  skills  Managing_Your_Career  21st._century  new_graduates  Andrew_McAfee  numeracy  insights  sense-making  jobs  uncharted_problems 
may 2012 by jerryking
Do Your Commitments Match Your Convictions?
January 2005 | HBR | By Donald N. Sull & Dominic Houlder
The Idea in Brief
How many of us struggle harder every day to uphold obligations to our bosses, families, and communities--even as the quality of our lives erodes? And how many of us feel too overwhelmed to examine the causes of this dilemma? For most people, it takes a crisis--illness, divorce, death of a loved one, business failure--before we'll
refocus our commitments of money, time, and energy on what really matters to us. But why wait for a crisis? Instead, use a systematic process to periodically clarify your convictions and assess
whether you're putting your money (and time and energy) where your mouth is. Identify high-priority values that are receiving insufficient resources--or outdated commitments that are siphoning precious resources away from your deepest convictions.
Once you've spotted gaps between what matters most to you and how you're investing your resources, use a time-out (a sabbatical, course, or retreat) to rethink old commitments and define new
ones more consistent with your values. By routinely applying this process, you--not your past obligations--will determine the direction your life takes.

The Idea in Practice
To manage the gap between your convictions and commitments, apply the following steps.
Inventory Your Values
List the things that matter most to you, in specific language. For example, instead of "Money," write,
"Providing financial security to my family," or "Earning enough to retire early." Aim for five to ten
values, and write what you honestly value--not what you think you should value.
Assess How You're Investing Your Resources
Track how much money, time, and energy you're devoting to your values. For each value you've
listed, record the following:
• Percentage of your household income you devote to that value
- 2 -
• Number of hours per week you spend on the value
• Quality of energy (high, low) you devote to activities related to that value. (An hour spent on an
activity when you're fresh and focused represents a greater commitment than an hour spent when
you're exhausted and distracted.)
Identify Gaps Between Your Values and Commitments
Do some values on your list receive little or none of your money, time, and energy? Is there a single
value that sucks a disproportionate share of your resources away from other priorities?
Understand What Has Caused the Gaps
Disconnects between what you value and how you actually spend your time can have several
causes. Perhaps you've taken on obligations without considering the long-term ramifications. One
successful entrepreneur in New York had promised to spend more time with her London-based
partner. But when she decided to sell her start-up to a West Coast competitor through a five-year
earn-out deal, she had to move to San Francisco to run the business. She now spends even more
time airborne--torn between two conflicting commitments she made simultaneously.
Or maybe you've let others define "success" for you. One young banker earned colleagues' praise
for his extreme work ethic. When he became a father, he wanted to spend more time with his family,
which baffled his colleagues. Because he badly desired continued praise from colleagues, he
continued his workaholic ways--and effectively gave his colleagues the power to set his priorities.
Change Course
It's harder to recalibrate commitments when you're not facing a crisis. A time-out--a sabbatical,
course, or other device--can help you reflect and give you an excuse to break old commitments and
forge new ones. To avoid "commitment creep," abandon or renegotiate one old commitment for every
new one you make.
HBR  Managing_Your_Career  Donald_Sull  values  JCK  indispensable  disproportionality  sabbaticals  slack_time  reflections  overwhelmed  financial_security  timeouts  what_really_matters 
march 2012 by jerryking
Hating America – until you really need help - The Globe and Mail
CHRYSTIA FREELAND | Columnist profile
From Friday's Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Sep. 15, 2011
superpowers  Chrystia_Freeland  schadenfreude  indispensable  America  Ian_Bremmer  G-Zero  America_in_Decline? 
october 2011 by jerryking
Business Advice: 14 Things I Wish I Could Have Told Myself at 25
August 24, 2011 | BNET | By Jeff Haden
1. Everybody wants something.
2. What a few people want is just to feel good about helping others.
3. Everything before “but” is bull.
4. Boring people win.
5. Stop brainstorming and start borrowing.
6. The women you really want to meet don’t care about the kind of car you drive. Darn it.
7. Training is great; advice is not.
8. Visibility is everything.
9. Always take out something.
10. The people who say the least have the most to say.
11. Your parents are a lot smarter than you think.
12. Always learn on the fly.
13. Don’t expect to get back what you give.
14. You will only regret what you decide not do.
advice  brainstorming  jck  Jeff_Haden  indispensable  lessons_learned  life_skills  regrets  unglamorous  visibility 
august 2011 by jerryking
Why You Should Stop Being a Wimp
Aug. 3, 2011 |BNET|By Suzanne Lucas |Ever met a successful
wimp? No such thing. The person who succeeds in the world of work isn't
the person that refuses to take chances. Business owners must take
financial & personal risks, evaluate mkts. & spot gaps which
they try to fill. Sometimes they commit to paying other people’s
salaries before knowing for sure if they’ll bring in enough $ to pay
their own. Successful sales people go out every day & risk rejection
in order to sell their products. You can't expect customers to
call. SVPs didn’t get there by keeping their head down & doing
precisely what their bosses asked of them. They looked for new
opportunities, suggested new paths for the biz, made difficult
decisions..This isn’t advice to be irrational, nor rude. Be politely
firm. Think through your plans–you must have plans in the 1st. place.
Do take risks where there is potential for payoff, do speak up in
meetings, do work your ass off and do ask for the recognition you
deserve.
advice  chutzpah  financial_risk  hard_choices  hustle  independent_viewpoints  indispensable  individual_initiative  intrinsically_motivated  It's_up_to_me  jck  ksfs  opportunities  overlooked_opportunities  owners  personal_payoffs  personal_risk  recognition  rejections  risk-taking  self-starters  speaking_up  uncharted_problems 
august 2011 by jerryking
FT.com / Management - The careerist: Contract to permanent
By Rhymer Rigby
May 15 2011

Start proving that you are indispensable before you start looking for
opportunities. Do the basics well, too – know the dress code and the
values, be punctual and polite, and go in with the attitude that you
need to prove yourself.”
How do I ensure any permanent roles come my way?
“Make an effort to build relationships so that if a permanent position
arises, people think of you,” says Mr Fleming.
Think beyond the team you are on, says Sue Smith, a director at BIE
Interim. “Talk to the HR department – they might have something
elsewhere in the business. Get to know how the business works and make
people aware of what you have been doing.”
indispensable  job_search  relationships  contracting 
may 2011 by jerryking
Mackubin Thomas Owens: Why We Still Need the Marines - WSJ.com
MAY 2, 2011 By MACKUBIN THOMAS OWENS. Their unique
combination of sea, land and air capabilities makes them an
indispensable rapid response force.
USMC  rapid-response  indispensable 
may 2011 by jerryking
Romil Bahl of PRGX, on the Emergence of Great Ideas - NYTimes.com
By ADAM BRYANT
March 12, 2011

“tactful audacity.” = you can’t give feedback to clients in anything but
a constructive fashion. You can’t sort of just push back willy-nilly,
and you don’t win arguments with clients, period. ..Now, having said
that, if you aren’t being audacious, if you aren’t challenging, if you
aren’t pushing back, you’re on your way out the door, right? You’re done
as the trusted adviser and partner. So now it’s in our value set. It’s
about tone and how you pass along a difficult message. You sort of flip
that around and say, “How do I like to hear advice and how do I not like
to hear it?” You’re doing it because you’re trying to help.
management_consulting  advice  indispensable  CEOs  audacity  howto  feedback  emotional_intelligence  enterprise_clients  JCK  chutzpah  core_values  EQ  difficult_conversations 
march 2011 by jerryking
We’ve Only Got America A - NYTimes.com
Dec. 14, 2010|NYT|TOM FRIEDMAN. If the U.S.weakens & can't
project power the way it has, kids won’t just grow up in a different
America. They'll grow up in a different world. You won't like who picks
up the pieces. Glance at recent headlines. The world sys.is being
challenged by 2 new forces: a rising superpower, China, & a rising
collection of super-empowered individuals, e.g. the WikiLeakers.
Globalization, tech. integration & the general flattening of the
world have super-empowered individuals to such a degree that they can
actually challenge hierarchies — from global banks to nation states — as
individuals...But here’s the fact: A China that chokes off
conversations far beyond its borders, and super-empowered individuals
who expose conversations far beyond their borders — are realities as
rising powers. A stable world requires getting the best from both &
limit the worst; it'll require smart legal & technological
responses...For that job, there's no alternative to a strong U.S.
Tom_Friedman  China_rising  WikiLeaks  globalization  indispensable  rising_powers  superpowers 
december 2010 by jerryking
American Dream is Changing | Nye - Gateway to Nevada's Rurals
Oct. 31, 2010 | Nye Gateway | by Fareed Zakaria. What can
you do to make yourself thrive in this new global economy? (1) Be
unique. Try to do something that is a specialized craft or art,
something that is as much art as craft, something that feels more like
artisanship than routine work, things that are custom & custom-made
still survive. (2) Go local. Do something that can’t be outsourced,
jobs involving personal face-to-face contact will never go to India. (3)
Be indispensable. Can everyone become indispensable? Well, no, but if
you learn a difficult craft and are good at it, if you can collaborate
well, synthesize well, put things together, work with others and work
well across countries and cultures, you will have a leg-up. (4) Learn a
foreign language (e.g. Spanish or Mandarin or Hindi). (5) Excel at
mathematics, able to manipulate data, algorithms, symbols, graphs,
balance sheets and all of these skills are the essential skills for a
knowledge-based economy.
Fareed_Zakaria  21st._century  ksfs  indispensable  specialization  local  languages  mathematics  organizing_data  advice  new_graduates  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  bespoke  quantitative  global_economy  digital_economy  knowledge_economy  the_American_dream  in-person  face2face  uniqueness 
october 2010 by jerryking
What to do if Canada wins a seat at the Security Council table -
Sep. 25, 2010 | The Globe & Mail | Paul
Heinbecker.....First and foremost, we need to take ourselves seriously
again, to pursue an active foreign policy informed by facts and
compassion, rather than by ideology and partisan calculation. To get
back in the game at the UN, we should tear a page from the British
playbook, and make ourselves indispensable, or at least so valuable that
others seek our help. .....Fifth, at the same time, we should continue
to oppose the creation of new permanent seats, with or without
accompanying vetoes. Democratic accountability requires that
seat-holders face their electorates from time to time. Further, standing
for election forces candidates to take an interest in the concerns of
their electors.
Canada  UN  goals  indispensable  rule_of_law  playbooks 
september 2010 by jerryking
To Get Paid What You're Worth, Know Your Disruptive Skills - Whitney Johnson -
September 14, 2010 | Harvard Business Review | Whitney Johnson.
To close the gap between what we're paid and what we're worth, there
is a lesson to be learned from the stock market. The stocks that trade
at fair value or even a premium to their peers are those that know what
kind of stock they are, and then deliver, whether "disruptive innovation
— emerging growth," "sustaining innovation — best-of-breed," or
"being-disrupted — but dividend-paying." Not surprisingly, the stocks
that lead with their unique or disruptive capabilities command the
highest absolute multiples...Translating this to our careers, when we
proffer to the marketplace a disruptive skill set, focusing on our
distinctive innate talents rather than 'me-too' skills, we are more
likely to achieve success and increase what we earn. Any hard-won,
'me-too' skills can follow as a kicker.
Clayton_Christensen  compensation  disruption  hbr  indispensable  JCK  Managing_Your_Career  non-routine  personal_growth  salaries  self-worth  skills  special_sauce  uncharted_problems 
september 2010 by jerryking
Provide true value or advisers are 'toast'
April 12, 2010 | G & M | DAN RICHARDS. "punctuated
equilibrium" is working its way through the fin. industry. The late
scientist, Stephen Jay Gould, identified this concept. His insight was
that while change is a constant, the pace of change isn't - for
millennia, species have gone through centuries of slow, almost
imperceptible change, interspersed with short periods of incredibly
rapid and intense shifts. In the last 30 yrs, most industries have had
to adapt to an entirely new set of rules. Change agents like Wal-Mart,
Costco, & Amazon.com have reshaped retailing. Mfg has been
transformed by globalization & China. The Web has decimated the
traditional biz model for newspapers. Svcs. have seen the effects of
off-shoring. The investment industry is going through that same epochal
transformation. Defining tomorrow's winners is their ability to
demonstrate clear, compelling, discernible value: not a plan itself, but
what a plan accomplishes, and the communication of what the plan achieves.
financial_advisors  Dan_Richards  indispensable  competitive_landscape  generating_strategic_options  adaptability  Charles_Darwin  evolution  value_creation  theory_of_evolution  financial_services  disequilibriums  change_agents  constant_change  value_propositions  Communicating_&_Connecting  accelerated_lifecycles 
august 2010 by jerryking
LINCHPIN: ARE YOU INDISPENSABLE?
Feb 2010 | Corporate Report Wisconsin Vol. 25, Iss. 6; pg. 7, 1 pgs | by Jack Covert.
ProQuest  Seth_Godin  book_reviews  indispensable 
may 2010 by jerryking
How America's Top Military Officer Uses Business to Boost National Security
May 1, 2010 | Fast Company | Jeff Chu. "He wanted to know what
kind of environment can be created in which business can thrive and
what role govts. have to play," "What is it that makes businesses
successful?" What does this have to do with his job or the military's?
"Our financial health is directly related to our national security,"
"The biggest driver globally is the economy ... I need to understand the
global trends that work those engines. Where are these guys putting
their $? If they're betting on certain outcomes -- good or bad -- why?"
Mullen's principles on the use of US military force: don't go it alone;
don't be overweight in foreign policy; closer coordination between
military and civilian agencies. "If his advice were only how to fight
hi-tech wars, and if his solution were just to apply more force, he
would be less relevant," Brent Scowcroft, "He recognizes that the new
face of war is a very complex...part combat, part nation building, and
part hearts and minds."
leadership  U.S._military  JCS  Michael_Mullen  nation_building  ethnography  geopolitics  21st._century  indispensable  storytelling  messaging  generalship  security_&_intelligence  Brent_Scowcroft  strategic_thinking  questions  war  warfare  complexity  curiosity  APNSA 
april 2010 by jerryking
MASTERING THE ART OF GIVING ADVICE
Fall 2008 | Leader to Leader. : Vol. Iss. 50; pg. 45 | by
James E Lukaszewski. Having influence means being remembered, being
asked in on decisions and strategy well before the strategies are
selected and the decisions need to be made. Those with influence make an
impact on their organizations and the larger world and can advance more
rapidly in their careers. Your advice may be perceptive, even wise, but
if it falls on deaf ears, it helps no one. Beyond the actual quality of
your advice, how you communicate that advice plays a major role in
ensuring that others can and will listen to it and act on it. The six
approaches suggested can help achieve this goal: 1. Be positive. 2.
Eliminate criticism as a coaching and advising practice. 3. Urge prompt
action. 4. Focus on outcomes. 5. Be an incrementalist. 6. Be pragmatic.
howto  advice  ProQuest  indispensable  guidelines  influence  leadership  managing_people  Managing_Your_Career  pragmatism  incrementalism  outcomes  action-oriented  coaching  upbeat 
march 2010 by jerryking
Unleashing your inner supernova
Dec 29, 2006 | The Globe & Mail. pg. B.8 | by Diane Davies.
Go beyond being a good and find out how to become indispensable. The
indispensable person is focused on success, and has built a reputation
not only for finding solutions, but for having visionary ideas and the
guts to make them reality. Here are four steps for building that
indispensable presence. (1) Own the company. Start thinking like the
company's owner. (2) Develop your presence. Avoid negativity. digest
information quickly and present it clearly and concisely. (3) Build
your reputation with colleagues, other parts of the company, members of
professional associations and the broader community. Be the "go-to"
person. Prepare. (4) Be visionary. Plus: Blowing your own horn
(softly). For Jason Isaacs.
indispensable  owners  up-and-comers  Managing_Your_Career  solutions  solution-finders  personal_branding  reputation  self-promotion  time-management  movingonup  visionaries  mindsets  Pablo_Picasso  negativity_bias  clarity  concision  Jason_Isaacs 
february 2010 by jerryking
Seth Godin on What it Takes to be a Linchpin [INTERVIEW]
Feb. 14, 2010 | Mashable | Interview of Seth Godin by Steve
Cunningham is the CEO of Polar Unlimited, a digital marketing agency.
In his book — Linchpin: Are You Indispensable? — Seth Godin poses a
challenge: Take your gift, whatever it is, and use it to change the
world. As Godin says, “a linchpin is the essential element, the person
who holds part of the operation together. Without the linchpin, the
thing falls apart.” "If I told you, step-by-step, what to do to become
indispensable, then anyone could do it. And if anyone could do it, it
wouldn’t be worth very much. Scarcity creates value. And, this is going
to frustrate people, but the emotional labor of work, today — the thing
that makes you worth $50,000 or $100,000 or $150,000 a year — is that
you can navigate the world without a map. People who need a map, are
going to get paid less and less and work harder and harder every day,
because there’s plenty of those people, and I can find them with a click
of the mouse."
Seth_Godin  indispensable  howto  entrepreneur  inspiration  scarcity  interviews  proprietary  sense-making  ambiguities  uncertainty  navigation  non-routine  uncharted_problems 
february 2010 by jerryking
Be The Advisor Who Helps Business Owners Respond To Change
Dec 1, 2008 National Underwriter | Life & Health | by John H Brown.

The US and world economies are changing fast. As an advisor to business owners, you know that, as a group, they are not as uneasy about the stock market's wild fluctuations as are the rest of your clients. You must reach out to your business owner clients. It is your job to understand that owners can still achieve their goals, to implement the strategies necessary to reach those goals and to share that information with your clients. Once business owners are clear about their objectives, you can evaluate the business and personal financial resources available to fund those objectives. Central to any company's planning is the need to motivate management to attain specific performance standards, such as meeting budget or reaching a specific sales goal or perhaps a departmental profitability objective. The current financial storm is not life threatening for most of your business owner clients -- if they respond.
ProQuest  financial_advisors  small_business  JCK  entrepreneur  passions  passion_investing  impact_investing  indispensable  owners  generating_strategic_options  objectives  control_systems  rewards 
february 2010 by jerryking
The Indispensible Ideas of 2009 - Harvard Business Review
2009 was a year of unprecedented change. The global economic
crisis caused us to reevaluate every aspect of business, from strategy
to innovation to managing resources. Throughout all of this, Harvard
Business Press remained a trusted source for the best ideas and advice
on weathering tough economic times.
booklists  business  HBR  indispensable  books 
february 2010 by jerryking
The Digitalization of the World - Adam Smith, Esq.
11 January, 2010 | Adam Smith, Esq. | post by Bruce MacEwen.
"Education, as a role for us, should I hope be obvious. We educate our
clients, " and "We don't just rent this knowledge out to our clients, we
should impart it so it becomes their own.
Financial/medical advisers are people to whom we entrust (one hopes) our
every secret, hope, and fear. We should serve the same function. ... We
should be able to provide them with various roadmap's, decision trees,
alternative ways of pursuing their objectives, with lesser and greater
ratios of return and reward. Hands-on personal care? Yes, because there
is no substitute for being there. The more amazing technology and
collaboration-at-a-distance becomes (what the Web, ultimately, is all
about), the more important face to face personal meetings are. The more
people you know "virtually," the more you want to meet them in person."
Bruce_MacEwen  JCK  client_management  inequality_of_information  trustworthiness  knowledge_intensive  management_consulting  indispensable  professional_education  digital_life  teaching  decision_trees  ratios  roadmaps  risk-assessment  strategic_thinking  risks  face2face  personal_meetings  personal_touch  generating_strategic_options  client_development  expertise  digitalization 
january 2010 by jerryking
Rummy's war
Apr 5, 2003 | The Globe & Mail. pg. F.1 | Barrie McKenna & Doug Saunders. "In the highest reaches of power, the people who have
influence are the ones who bring the president solutions, not problems,"
the former White House insider explained. "When Rumsfeld says we are
going to overthrow the Taliban and I don't need 100,000 troops to do it,
and it happens, that adds to your influence."
Donald_Rumsfeld  profile  rules_of_the_game  Doug_Saunders  Iraq  indispensable  influence  problem_solving  generating_strategic_options  solutions  solution-finders 
december 2009 by jerryking
Strengthen Your Brand
January 2006 | By Oren Harari, Ph.D. The goal of great
branding is not just to be recognized, but to be successful— in terms of
building customer loyalty and profitable growth. 1. Discrimination. 2.
Domination. 3. Startling value. 4. Deep reservoirs of knowledge. 5.
Intimate relationship. 6. Community. 7. Legacy.
branding  howto  personal_branding  indispensable 
october 2009 by jerryking
How to Ask Better Questions
May 6, 2009 | Management Essentials - HarvardBusiness.org | by Judith Ross.

The most effective and empowering questions create value in one or more of the following ways:

They create clarity: “Can you explain more about this situation?”
They construct better working relations: Instead of “Did you make your sales goal?” ask, “How have sales been going?”
They help people think analytically and critically: “What are the consequences of going this route?”
They inspire people to reflect and see things in fresh, unpredictable ways: “Why did this work?”
They encourage breakthrough thinking: “Can that be done in any other way?”
They challenge assumptions: “What do you think you will lose if you start sharing responsibility for the implementation process?
They create ownership of solutions: “Based on your experience, what do you suggest we do here?”
assumptions  breakthroughs  clarity  critical_thinking  fresh_eyes  Harvard  HBR  howto  indispensable  inspiration  JCK  owners  questions  reflections  relationships  value_creation 
june 2009 by jerryking
A Harvard Lightning Rod Finds Path to Renewal - NYTimes.com
December 6, 2008 | New York Times | By JODI KANTOR and JAVIER
C. HERNANDEZ.

As economics came to the forefront of the presidential campaign, Mr.
Obama faced constant decisions on the subject. Mr. Summers’s allies in
the campaign put Mr. Summers on the phone, giving him a key task: to
synthesize the developments for Mr. Obama. Mr. Summers made himself into
an essential guide, Obama aides say, and earned a place in the
administration.
indispensable  Larry_Summers  Obama  Harvard  economic_policy  economic_analyses 
may 2009 by jerryking
John Madden Made Us Smarter - WSJ.com
APRIL 20, 2009 | Wall street Journal | by LEONARD CASSUTO.
Details the impact--suggests he was a transformational figure--that
Madden has had across various sports based as a sports analyst. Mr.
Madden proceeded to reinvent the job of football broadcaster, beginning
at a crucial time when television was surpassing radio as the dominant
medium in sports broadcasting. His preparation -- attending team
practices during the week before the game, studying game film, and so on
-- were all new and quickly became standard. "You knew how prepared he
was."
sports  television  preparation  indispensable  NFL  sportscasting  smart_people  trailblazers  transformational  sports_journalism 
may 2009 by jerryking
Green Diplomacy - WSJ.com
March 24, 2008 WSJ article by Joel Sherwood profiling U.S.
Ambassador to Sweden, Michael Wood, and his role assisting Swedish alt.
energy companies raise cash in the US.
alternative_energy  diplomacy  green  policy  environment  indispensable 
february 2009 by jerryking
The HR Department: Give It More Respect - WSJ.com
March 10, 2008 WSJ article by Edward Lawler III on initiatives
that HR departments should be doing: advising top management on strategy
and organizational effectiveness. Do so while using the latest
technology and talent.
human_resources  leadership  human_capital  talent_management  advice  indispensable 
january 2009 by jerryking
Advice to MBAs: become known as the go-to person in your field
List of tips for achieving success as MBAs (or frankly, any career) published in the Aug. 7, 2007 | Financial Times |

* Become an expert. "If you can become the absolute go-to person in a field and prove that you can master one thing, you can lather, rinse, repeat, as we say, you can do that in many different factions of your life."

* Commit the time. "It is first in, last out for a period where you

are trying to learn and absorb

a business. If you are able to understand all of the things in the business and really give it your all for certain periods in your life, that will be paid back in spades as you think about all the components that you need to have known."

* Learn to listen. "You have to develop listening skills, especially from the people who have already been there before you, because they could say one little sentence that has more pearls of wisdom

in it than anything that you may come up with on your own.

A mentor can often do that; they can often share with you things about people who have been there before or things they have seen or the way that your style is."

* Find a mentor. "Mentors are critically important for someone's career for the guidance and the support you need. I don't believe in formal mentor programmes.

A mentor is a chemistry thing,

you have to find somebody who cares about your career and who wants to invest the time, not

who has to invest the time."

* Dress for success. "If you want to be asked to a client meeting, show up at work in the morning as if you're going to a client meeting. Way too often the casualness of the younger generation seeps into the work environment and that's not going to be helpful to getting in front

of clients and really getting that experience."
tips  career  Managing_Your_Career  MBAs  indispensable  advice  hard_work  listening  mentoring 
january 2009 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: And from the Russian judge...
More good stuff from Seth Godin. Sticking to it to get a task
done! When VC firms look for entrepreneurs on whom to risk their money,
they aren't searching for a great idea, or even great credentials. No,
what they're searching for is this: the certainty that the person who
brings them a business idea is going to carry the torch for that idea as
long as it takes, that the idea will get passed on, and that the
business will make it across the finish line-- torchbearers.
Torchbearers are people with that rare skill, the ability to dig deep
when the need arises -- to get past the short-term pain and to pull off
an act that few would have believed possible.
Seth_Godin  perseverance  indispensable  leadership  torchbearers  entrepreneur  venture_capital  vc  grit  certainty  character_traits  champions  overambitious 
september 2007 by jerryking

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