recentpopularlog in

jerryking : industrial_internet   75

Roger McNamee on how to tame Big Tech
February 7, 2019 | Financial Times | Roger McNamee.

Government intervention of this kind is a first step on the path to resolving the privacy issues that result from the architecture, business models and culture of internet platforms. But privacy is not the only problem we must confront. Internet platforms are transforming our economy and culture in unprecedented ways. We do not even have a vocabulary to describe this transformation, which complicates the challenge facing policymakers....Google, Facebook and other internet platforms use data to influence or manipulate users in ways that create economic value for the platform, but not necessarily for the users themselves. In the context of these platforms, users are not the customer. They are not even the product. They are more like fuel.....Google, Facebook and the rest now have economic power on the scale of early 20th-century monopolists such as Standard Oil. What is unprecedented is the political power that internet platforms have amassed — power that they exercise with no accountability or oversight, and seemingly without being aware of their responsibility to society......When capitalism functions properly, government sets and enforces the rules under which businesses and citizens must operate. Today, however, corpor­ations have usurped this role. Code and algorithms have replaced the legal system as the limiter on behaviour. Corporations such as Google and Facebook behave as if they are not accountable to anyone. Google’s seeming disdain for regulation by the EU and Facebook’s violations of the spirit of its agreement with the US FTC over user consent are cases in point......AI promises to be revolutionary. That said, it will not necessarily be a force for good. The problem is the people who create AI. They are human...McNamee recommends two areas of emphasis: regulation and innovation. As for the former, the most important requirement is to create and enforce standards that require new technology to serve the needs of those who use it and society as a whole. ...... The IoT requires our approval. Do not give it until vendors behave responsibly. Demand that policymakers take action to protect public health, democracy, privacy, innovation and the economy.
accountability  Alexa  antitrust  artificial_intelligence  biases  Big_Tech  consent  dark_side  Facebook  Google  Industrial_Internet  monopolies  personal_data  platforms  political_power  privacy  Roger_McNamee  sensors  surveillance  unintended_consequences 
february 2019 by jerryking
Japan gears up for mega hack of its own citizens
February 5, 2019 | Financial Times | by Leo Lewis.

Yoshitaka Sakurada, Japan’s 68-year-old minister for cyber security, stands ready to press the button next week on an unprecedented hack of 200m internet enabled devices across Japan — a genuinely imaginative, epically-scaled and highly controversial government cyber attack on homes and businesses designed as an empirical test of the nation’s vulnerability. A new law, fraught with public contention over constitutionally-guaranteed privacy, was passed last May and has just come into effect to give the government the right to perform the hack and make this experiment possible. The scope for government over-reach, say critics, cannot be overstated. Webcams, routers and other devices will be targeted in the attacks, which will primarily establish what proportion have no password protection at all, or one that can be easily guessed. At best, say cyber security experts at FireEye, the experiment could rip through corporate Japan’s complacency and elevate security planning from the IT department to the C-suite.

The experiment, which will run for five years and is being administered through the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, is intended to focus on devices that fall into the broadly-defined category of “internet of things” (IoT) — anything from a yoga mat that informs a smartphone of your contortions, to remotely controlled factory robots. And while cyber experts say IoT security may not be the very top priority in the fight against cyber crime and cyber warfare, they see good reasons why Japan has chosen to make its stand here.....warnings that the rise of IoT will create a vast new front of vulnerability unless the security of, for example, a web-enabled yoga mat is taken as seriously by both manufacturers and users as the security of a banking website. The big cyber security consultancies, along with various governments, have historically relied on a range of gauges to calculate the scale of the problem. The Japanese government’s own National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) uses scans of the dark web to estimate that, of the cyber attacks it detected in 2017, 54 per cent targeted IoT devices.
C-suite  cyberattacks  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  dark_web  experimentation  hacks  Industrial_Internet  Japan  overreach  preparation  privacy  readiness  testing  vulnerabilities  white_hats 
february 2019 by jerryking
The Morning Download: Computing’s Future Lies at Edge of Network, Just Before the Cloud - CIO Journal. - WSJ
By Steve Rosenbush
Jun 20, 2018

For years, computing has been centralized in one place or another. First, the data center, and later massive clouds. Now, networks are taking a more decentralized structure, with power located at the so-called edge, be it a retail environment, an oil rig or an automobile. On Tuesday, Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co. said it will invest $4 billion during the next four years to accelerate innovation in what HPE calls “the intelligent edge.”

Edge of opportunity. “We see significant areas for growth … (as) more assets and ‘things’ come online and the amount of data generated continues to grow exponentially,” HPE CEO Antonio Neri told CIO Journal’s Sara Castellanos in an email. The number of devices connected to the internet will reach 20.4 billion by 2020, up from 8.4 billion in 2017, according to Gartner Research Inc. By 2021, 40% of enterprises will have an edge computing strategy in place, up from about 1% in 2017, Gartner says.

The payoff. Stewart Ebrat, CIO at bridal gown and fashion company Vera Wang Co., an HPE customer, maintains that with data analytics and Bluetooth-enabled beacon devices at the edge, a salesperson could know more about a prospective customer’s preferences as soon as they walk into a brick-and-mortar store. Says Mr. Ebrat: “The customer has always been number one (at Vera Wang), but technology is going to enhance that experience even further.”
cloud_computing  decentralization  edge  future  Industrial_Internet  IT  artificial_intelligence  centralization  machine_learning  HPE  HP  data_centers 
june 2018 by jerryking
The future of computing is at the edge
June 6, 2018 | FT | by Richard Waters in San Francisco.

With so much data being produced, sending it all to cloud does not make economic sense.

The economics of big data — and the machine learning algorithms that feed on it — have been a gift to the leading cloud computing companies. By drawing data-intensive tasks into their massive, centralised facilities, companies such as Amazon, Microsoft and Google have thrived by bringing down the unit costs of computing.

But artificial intelligence is also starting to feed a very different paradigm of computing. This is one that pushes more data-crunching out to the network “edge” — the name given to the many computing devices that intersect with the real world, from internet-connected cameras and smartwatches to autonomous cars. And it is fuelling a wave of new start-ups which, backers claim, represent the next significant architectural shift in computing.....nor.ai, an early-stage AI software start-up that raised $12m this month, is typical of this new wave. Led by Ali Farhadi, an associate professor at University of Washington, the company develops machine learning algorithms that can be run on extremely low-cost gadgets. Its image recognition software, for instance, can operate on a Raspberry Pi, a tiny computer costing just $5, designed to teach the basics of computer science......That could make it more economical to analyse data on the spot rather than shipping it to the cloud. One possible use: a large number of cheap cameras around the home with the brains to recognise visitors, or tell the difference between a burglar and a cat.

The overwhelming volume of data that will soon be generated by billions of devices such as these upends the logic of data centralisation, according to Mr Farhadi. “We like to say that the cloud is a way to scale AI, but to me it’s a roadblock to AI,” he said. “There is no cloud that can digest this much data.”

“The need for this is being driven by the mass of information being collected at the edge,” added Peter Levine, a partner at Silicon Valley venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz and investor in a number of “edge” start-ups. “The real expense is going to be shipping all that data back to the cloud to be processed when it doesn’t need to be.”

Other factors add to the attractions of processing data close to where it is collected. Latency — the lag that comes from sending information to a distant data centre and waiting for results to be returned — is debilitating for some applications, such as driverless cars that need to react instantly. And by processing data on the device, rather than sending it to the servers of a large cloud company, privacy is guaranteed.

Tobias Knaup, co-founder of Mesosphere, another US start-up, uses a recent computing truism to sum up the trend: “Data has gravity.”....Nor are the boundaries between cloud and edge distinct. Data collected locally is frequently needed to retrain machine learning algorithms to keep them relevant, a computing-intensive task best handled in the cloud. Companies such as Mesosphere — which raised $125m this month, taking the total to more than $250m — are betting that this will give rise to technologies that move information and applications to where they are best handled, from data centres out to the edge and vice versa...Microsoft unveiled image-recognition software that was capable of running on a local device rather than its own data centres.
cloud_computing  edge  future  Industrial_Internet  IT  low-cost  artificial_intelligence  centralization  machine_learning  data_centers  decentralization  Microsoft  computer_vision  Richard_Waters 
june 2018 by jerryking
G.E., the 124-Year-Old Software Start-Up - The New York Times
By STEVE LOHRAUG. 27, 2016
Continue reading the main storyShare This Page
Share
Tweet
Pin
Email
More
software  predictive_maintenance  paranoia  Jeffrey_Immelt  GE  analytics  Industrial_Internet 
august 2016 by jerryking
What you need to know about blockchain technology | Toronto Star
By thestar.com
Fri., May 6, 2016

This Internet of Everything Needs a Ledger of Everything, powered by blockchain.
blockchain  Industrial_Internet  transaction_costs 
may 2016 by jerryking
The Apple Case Will Grope Its Way Into Your Future - The New York Times
Farhad Manjoo
STATE OF THE ART FEB. 24, 2016

In an Internet of Things world, every home appliance could be turned into a listening post. That’s why the Apple case matters. ... controversy over whether Apple should be forced to unlock an iPhone
Apple  FBI  privacy  Industrial_Internet  connected_devices  Farhad_Manjoo  home_appliances  encryption  surveillance  civil_liberties  cryptography  iPhone 
february 2016 by jerryking
Definitive ways brands can harness the Internet of Things - iMediaConnection.com
Jessica Groopman
Contact
Follow this authorRSSTwitter Media Planning & Buying Posted on March 10, 2015
Industrial_Internet  Altimeter  brands  LBMA  location_based_services 
february 2016 by jerryking
Looking Beyond the Internet of Things
JAN. 1, 2016 | NYT | By QUENTIN HARDY.

Adam Bosworth is building what some call a “data singularity.” In the Internet of Things, billions of devices and sensors would wirelessly connect to far-off data centers, where millions of computer servers manage and learn from all that information.

Those servers would then send back commands to help whatever the sensors are connected to operate more effectively: A home automatically turns up the heat ahead of cold weather moving in, or streetlights behave differently when traffic gets bad. Or imagine an insurance company instantly resolving who has to pay for what an instant after a fender-bender because it has been automatically fed information about the accident.

Think of it as one, enormous process in which machines gather information, learn and change based on what they learn. All in seconds.... building an automated system that can react to all that data like a thoughtful person is fiendishly hard — and that may be Mr. Bosworth’s last great challenge to solve....this new era in computing will have effects far beyond a little more efficiency. Consumers could see a vast increase in the number of services, ads and product upgrades that are sold alongside most goods. And products that respond to their owner’s tastes — something already seen in smartphone upgrades, connected cars from BMW or Tesla, or entertainment devices like the Amazon Echo — could change product design.
Quentin_Hardy  Industrial_Internet  data  data_centers  data_driven  machine_learning  Google  Amazon  cloud_computing  connected_devices  BMW  Tesla  Amazon_Echo  product_design  Michael_McDerment  personalization  connected_cars 
january 2016 by jerryking
Short Cuts
October 10-11 | FT|

As homes get smarter, humans inch closer to being deposed as lords and masters. Now Amazon is accelerating the process: planning to connect washing machines to its website to or...
smart_homes  Amazon  connected_devices  Industrial_Internet  laundry_rooms  home_appliances  home_automation  white_goods 
november 2015 by jerryking
Whirlpool CIO: The future of IoT demands a new IT paradigm
by Mary K. Pratt

Whirlpool CIO Mike Heim is using cutting-edge tech to reinvent the lowly laundromat, but first he had to reinvent how his IT team worked. Welcome to the future of IoT.....Clothespin technology allows people to use their smartphones to remotely check for available washers and dryers, pay with MasterCard or Visa rather than coins, add cycles remotely and receive notification when laundry cycles are done.

On the operator side, Clothespin enables equipment service providers to remotely change prices based on demand, time of day and other market factors; track machine utilization; identify machines requiring maintenance; and provide users with promotions and loyalty programs.

Developed in a five-day sprint last June, the project had Heim's tech people moving between e-payment processing and IT security and mobile app development and working with a variety of business functions and vendors.
Whirlpool  laundry_rooms  CIOs  laundromats  home_appliances  white_goods  Industrial_Internet  cloud_computing  mobile_applications  reinvention 
september 2015 by jerryking
GE, Cisco flex major muscle in trend toward 'Industrial Internet' - The Globe and Mail
DAVID MILSTEAD
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 05, 2015

What GE did, says William Blair & Co. analyst Nicholas Heymann, is write software to collect data from its equipment – from locomotives to jet engines – and develop algorithms that help its customers make better plans, like a railway predicting where to add capacity based on port traffic, or where an airline should develop a hub for travel in 2020....Cisco, the global leader in the routers that allow computer networks to communicate, has spent $1-billion setting up six global “Internet of Everything” data centres and committed $100-million to an innovation fund. It’s promoting app development in developer communities and is working to create technical standards for the industry. It’s deployed Internet of Things offerings at several major customers, including Shell and Harley-Davidson,
sensors  Industrial_Internet  GE  Cisco  algorithms  predictive_analytics 
june 2015 by jerryking
Water Data Deluge: Addressing the California Drought Requires Access to Accurate Data - The CIO Report - WSJ
April 22, 2015| WSJ | By KIM S. NASH.

California, now in its fourth year of drought, is collecting more data than ever from utilities, municipalities and other water providers about just how much water flows through their pipes....The data-collection process, built on monthly self-reporting and spreadsheets, is critical to informing such policy decisions, which affect California’s businesses and 38.8 million residents. Some say the process, with a built-in lag time of two weeks between data collection and actionable reports, could be better, allowing for more effective, fine-tuned management of water.

“More data and better data will allow for more nuanced approaches and potentially allow the water system to function more efficiently,”...“Right now, there are inefficiencies in the system and they don’t know exactly where, so they have to resort to blanket policy responses.”...the State Water Resources Control Board imports the data into a spreadsheet to tabulate and compare with prior months. Researchers then cleanse the data, find and resolve anomalies and create graphics to show what’s happened with water in the last month. The process takes about 2 weeks....accuracy is an issue in any self-reporting scenario...while data management could be improved by installing smart meters to feed information directly to the Control Board automatically... there are drawbacks to any technology. Smart meters can fail, for example. “The nice thing about spreadsheets is anyone can open it up and immediately see everything there,”
lag_time  water  California  data  spreadsheets  inefficiencies  municipalities  utilities  bureaucracies  droughts  vulnerabilities  self-reporting  decision_making  Industrial_Internet  SPOF  bottlenecks  data_management  data_quality  data_capture  data_collection 
april 2015 by jerryking
IBM to Invest $3 Billion in Sensor-Data Unit - WSJ
March 31, 2015 | WSJ | By DON CLARK. Can CBC get good at communicating the final product on behalf of clients of Pelmorex. So CBC considers supplying the communications platform?

IBM plans to invest $3 billion over four years on a new business helping customers gather and analyze the flood of data from sensor-equipped devices and smartphones.... IBM announced that it is forming an alliance with the Weather Company, which owns the Weather Channel and other information providers. The two companies plan jointly to exploit data about weather conditions to help businesses make better decisions....the centerpiece of IBM's new business unit is a collection of online software called IoT Foundation that runs on IBM’s existing cloud services and allows customers and partners to create new applications and enhance existing ones with real-time data and analysis....IBM is betting that correlating dissimilar kinds of data will yield the highest value. “It’s essential to federate information from multiple sources,” said Bob Picciano, IBM’s senior VP of analytics.... the Weather Channel serves up 700,000 weather forecasts a second. It already sells data to a range of customers in agriculture, transportation and other industries that rely on weather.

But the opportunities have expanded, Mr. Kenny said, as weather sensors installed in many more places have contributed to more timely, localized forecasts. The added detail helps farmers predict more precisely, for example, where hail could impact their fields, Mr. Kenny said.

The Weather Company is turning to IBM, he said, because of its software expertise and relationships with customers in many industries.
sensors  IBM  weather  massive_data_sets  data  data_driven  analytics  Industrial_Internet  smartphones  cloud_computing 
march 2015 by jerryking
G.E. Opens Its Big Data Platform - NYTimes.com
By QUENTIN HARDY OCTOBER 9, 2014

Next year, G.E. plans to connect this big data product, called Predix, to machines made by other companies. It is also establishing a means for companies to build and deploy their own customized software applications on Predix. Part of that approach involves using G.E.’s own modeling software, which helps a customer understand ahead of time whether making the software is justified by anticipated cost savings.

If successful, the GE analysis platform will likely touch tens of millions of devices around the globe. Already, Cisco has agreed to put Predix software inside its networking products, starting with a specialized computer router for harsh environments like oil fields. Intel has developed a reference architecture that integrates Intel processors with the GE software.

Softbank, Verizon and Vodaphone have agreed to provide means of wireless connectivity to devices with the software. GE already has a deal like that with AT&T, which means the system could be used across much of the globe.
GE  massive_data_sets  sensors  Industrial_Internet  platforms 
october 2014 by jerryking
Google takes aim at Apple with new gadgets launch - The Globe and Mail
OMAR EL AKKAD - TECHNOLOGY REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jun. 25 2014,

Among the products unveiled were Google Fit (a health and fitness platform), Android Auto (which brings the popular operating system to cars) and Android TV.

Many of these products seem to mirror similar offerings recently released by Google’s chief rival, Apple. For example, at the iPhone-maker’s own developers’ conference earlier this month, the company boasted of its own fitness software platform, HealthKit, and a tool called CarPlay that offers drivers a safer way to use their iPhones in the car....In the fight for connected device dominance, the companies’ strategies are markedly different.

Whereas Apple’s mobile product lineup has always had a razor-sharp focus, Google tends to design and announce myriad product types and categories, and then quietly retire those that don’t catch on with consumers.
Omar_el_Akkad  Google  Android  software_developers  Apple  product_launches  privacy  connected_devices  Industrial_Internet  mobile_applications  wearables 
june 2014 by jerryking
The Abundance Builders | World Future Society
July 0-August 2012 | The Futurist | By Peter H. Diamandis and Steven Kotler.
sensors  Industrial_Internet  abundance 
may 2014 by jerryking
Start-Ups Are Mining Hyperlocal Information for Global Insights - NYTimes.com
November 10, 2013 | WSJ | By QUENTIN HARDY

By analyzing the photos of prices and the placement of everyday items like piles of tomatoes and bottles of shampoo and matching that to other data, Premise is building a real-time inflation index to sell to companies and Wall Street traders, who are hungry for insightful data.... Collecting data from all sorts of odd places and analyzing it much faster than was possible even a couple of years ago has become one of the hottest areas of the technology industry. The idea is simple: With all that processing power and a little creativity, researchers should be able to find novel patterns and relationships among different kinds of information.

For the last few years, insiders have been calling this sort of analysis Big Data. Now Big Data is evolving, becoming more “hyper” and including all sorts of sources. Start-ups like Premise and ClearStory Data, as well as larger companies like General Electric, are getting into the act....General Electric, for example, which has over 200 sensors in a single jet engine, has worked with Accenture to build a business analyzing aircraft performance the moment the jet lands. G.E. also has software that looks at data collected from 100 places on a turbine every second, and combines it with power demand, weather forecasts and labor costs to plot maintenance schedules.
start_ups  data  data_driven  data_mining  data_scientists  inflation  indices  massive_data_sets  hyperlocal  Premise  Accenture  GE  ClearStory  real-time  insights  Quentin_Hardy  pattern_recognition  photography  sensors  maintenance  industrial_Internet  small_data 
november 2013 by jerryking
When Complexity Is Free - NYTimes.com
September 14, 2013 | NYT | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN.
(Charles Waud & WaudWare)
When everything and everyone becomes connected, and complexity is free and innovation is both dirt-cheap and can come from anywhere, the world of work changes.
Tom_Friedman  GE  Industrial_Internet  interconnections  massive_data_sets  crowdsourcing  business_models  complexity  3-D  contests  prognostics  innovation 
september 2013 by jerryking
Personal Data: The Emergence of a New Asset Class
January 2011 | An Initiative of the World Economic Forum
In Collaboration with Bain & Company, Inc
data  mydata  frameworks  privacy  Industrial_Internet  Bain  asset_classes 
july 2013 by jerryking
Mapping the Future with Big Data
July-August 2013 | World Future Society (Vol. 47, No. 4) |By Patrick Tucker.

The hiker scenario is one that Esri (originally Environmental Systems Research Institute Inc.) demonstrates at conferences, such as its Federal GIS user conference that took place in February. It is, in many ways, a snapshot of the way that statistical data from databases, user data from multiple participants, and social network data from the public will change the nature of rapid decision making in the years ahead. It’s a very big change, and Esri is at the forefront of the way big data and geography will merge in the future....In the nascent era of big data, Esri is poised to become much more significant as we incorporate computerized sensing and broadcasting abilities into our physical environment, creating what is sometimes called an “Internet of things.” Data from sensor networks, RFID tags, surveillance cameras, unmanned aerial vehicles, and geotagged social-media posts all have geographical components to them. After decades of quietly serving the computer mapping and modeling needs of its clients, Esri has suddenly found itself in a new field, using geo-specific data to reveal how businesses, institutions, populations, and entire nations are changing—or being changed by—the physical world, in real time.
future  massive_data_sets  mapping  GIS  predictive_modeling  cyberphysical  tacit_data  crowdsourcing  ESRI  geography  sensors  Industrial_Internet  RFID  meat_space  real-time  location_based_services  LBMA  physical_world 
july 2013 by jerryking
Advanced Manufacturing: The New Industrial Revolution - WSJ.com
June 10, 2013 | WSJ | By JOHN KOTEN.

A Revolution in the Making
Digital technology is transforming manufacturing, making it leaner and smarter—and raising the prospect of an American industrial revival
3-D  Nike  GE  manufacturers  Industrial_Internet  massive_data_sets 
june 2013 by jerryking
Sensing the Future Before It Occurs
William Ruh (General Electric), interviewed by Michael Fitzgerald

December 20, 2012
GE  Industrial_Internet 
january 2013 by jerryking
Welcome to the thingternet
Nov 21st 2012 | The Economist from The World In 2013 print edition| Nick Valéry: Difference Engine columnist, The Economist
Industrial_Internet  cloud_computing 
january 2013 by jerryking
Big Data: Rise of the Machines
December 31, 2012 | NYTimes.com | By STEVE LOHR.

What is different between "analytics" and "Big Data"? Data volumes have been steadily increasing for decades, Mr. Davenport noted, though the pace has accelerated sharply in the Internet age. “More than the amount of data itself, the unstructured data from the Web and sensors is a much more salient feature of what is being called Big Data,” he said.

I also asked David B. Yoffie, a technology and competitive strategy expert at Harvard, who is not part of the Big Data crowd, what he thought. The Internet, he observed, has been a mainstream technology for 15 years, and so has the ability to monitor and mine Web browsing behavior and online communications, even if those skills are much improved now.

Still, Mr. Yoffie is most impressed by the rapid spread of low-cost sensors that make it possible to monitor all kinds of physical objects, from fruit shipments (sniffing for signs of spoilage) to jet engines (tracking wear to predict when maintenance is needed).

“The ubiquity of sensors is new,” Mr. Yoffie said. “The sensors make it possible to get data we never had before.”

Machine-generated sensor data will be become a far larger portion of the Big Data world, according to a recent report by IDC. The research report, “The Digital Universe in 2020,” published in December, traces data trends from 2005-20. One of its forecasts is that machine-generated data will increase to 42 percent of all data by 2020, up from 11 percent in 2005.

“It’s all those sensors, the Internet of Things data,” said Jeremy Burton, an executive vice president at EMC, which sponsored the IDC report.

The implication is that Big Data technology will steadily move beyond the consumer Internet.
massive_data_sets  Steve_Lohr  Thomas_Davenport  unstructured_data  Industrial_Internet  David_Yoffie  data  saliencies  sensors  analytics 
january 2013 by jerryking
G.E. Looks to Industry for the Next Digital Disruption - NYTimes.com
By STEVE LOHR
Published: November 23, 2012

G.E. resides in a different world from the consumer Internet. But the major technologies that animate Google and Facebook are also vital ingredients in the industrial Internet — tools from artificial intelligence, like machine-learning software, and vast streams of new data. In industry, the data flood comes mainly from smaller, more powerful and cheaper sensors on the equipment.

Smarter machines, for example, can alert their human handlers when they will need maintenance, before a breakdown. It is the equivalent of preventive and personalized care for equipment, with less downtime and more output.... Today, G.E. is putting sensors on everything, be it a gas turbine or a hospital bed. The mission of the engineers in San Ramon is to design the software for gathering data, and the clever algorithms for sifting through it for cost savings and productivity gains. Across the industries it covers, G.E. estimates such efficiency opportunities at as much as $150 billion.

Some industrial Internet projects are already under way. First Wind, an owner and operator of 16 wind farms in America, is a G.E. customer for wind turbines. It has been experimenting with upgrades that add more sensors, controls and optimization software.

The new sensors measure temperature, wind speeds, location and pitch of the blades. They collect three to five times as much data as the sensors on turbines of a few years ago, said Paul Gaynor, chief executive of First Wind. The data is collected and analyzed by G.E. software, and the operation of each turbine can be tweaked for efficiency. For example, in very high winds, turbines across an entire farm are routinely shut down to prevent damage from rotating too fast. But more refined measurement of wind speeds might mean only a portion of the turbines need to be shut down. In wintry conditions, turbines can detect when they are icing up, and speed up or change pitch to knock off the ice.

Upgrades on 123 turbines on two wind farms have so far delivered a 3 percent increase in energy output, about 120 megawatt hours per turbine a year. That translates to $1.2 million in additional revenue a year from those two farms, Mr. Gaynor said.

“It’s not earthshaking, but it is meaningful,” he said. “These are real commercial investments for us that make economic sense now.” ...
breakdowns  GE  Industrial_Internet  disruption  Steve_Lohr  sensors  artificial_intelligence  machine_learning  digital_disruption  downtime 
november 2012 by jerryking
Ghosts in the machines
September 17, 2001 | Canadian Business | Paul Kaihla

If mainframes led the first computer revefufion and PCs the second, embedded systems represent third Great Leap Forward. Despite the hoopla about all the wondrous things a person will be able to do with a PDA or smart phone, that kind of flashy product constitutes only about one-tenth of the overall embedded-systems market. The future of pervasive computing actually ties in the many seemingly humble embedded devices that have already infiltrated peoples daily iives. Embedded systems constitute an almost invisible layer of computing that permeates the very fabric of daily life. Embedded systems will ultimately displace the desktop for virtuaiiy everything except for very specific applications. While the proliferation of embedded silicon may indeed spell relief for slumping chip-makers, the real beam wiii be in software — for two reasons. First, it is often the major cost in any embedded system. The second reason is the Web.
Industrial_Internet  pervasive_computing  ambient_computing  infiltration 
july 2012 by jerryking
GE looks to claim 'big data' foothold
Nov. 17, 2011 | The Financial Times | Jeremy Lemer.

GE's role as a maker of intelligent products and its deep experience in sectors such as aviation and energy will give it a powerful advantage when designing useful algorithms and selling analytical software.
GE  massive_data_sets  Industrial_Internet  software 
march 2012 by jerryking
For Start-Ups, Sorting the Data Cloud Is the Next Big Thing - NYTimes.com
By MALIA WOLLAN
Published: December 25, 2011

Splunk, a San Francisco-based start-up whose software indexes vast quantities of machine-generated data into searchable links. Companies search those links, as one searches Google, to analyze customer behavior in real time....Splunk is among a crop of enterprise software start-up companies that analyze big data and are establishing themselves in territory long controlled by giant business-technology vendors like Oracle and I.B.M....“Big software is sold on the golf course, not sold to the people who actually use it,”
massive_data_sets  cloud_computing  start_ups  unstructured_data  sorting  Industrial_Internet  Splunk  data_driven  data_mining  cheap_revolution 
december 2011 by jerryking
G.E. Wants Software for the 'Industrial Internet' - NYTimes.com
By STEVE LOHR | November 21, 2011,
G.E. announced last Thursday that it was opening a new global software center in Northern California, with plans to hire 400 software engineers to develop code for what the company calls the “industrial Internet.”...The mission of the software center in San Ramon, Calif., will be to design the layer of software that makes the idea of intelligent machines a reality. In fact, G.E. already employs 5,000 software engineers worldwide, but they are working mostly on the close-to-the-metal programs that animate its machinery... The center will be building software for pulling the data from GE machines and then analyzing it for insights that reduce costs and improve efficiency and safety.
GE  Industrial_Internet  software 
december 2011 by jerryking
The Internet Gets Physical
By STEVE LOHR
Published: December 17, 2011

The next wave of computing does not step away from the consumer Internet so much as build on it for different uses (posing some of the same sorts of privacy and civil liberties concerns). Software techniques like pattern recognition and machine learning used in Internet searches, online advertising and smartphone apps are also ingredients in making smart devices to manage energy consumption, health care and traffic.
Industrial_Internet  sentiment_analysis  sensors  IBM  GE  Steve_Lohr 
december 2011 by jerryking
The next big tech revolution? The global brain - The Globe and Mail
Sep. 22, 2011 | Globe and Mail | CHRYSTIA FREELAND.

Mr. Milner, in contrast, almost perfectly represents a technology elite with a global reference: He lives in Moscow, recently bought a home in Silicon Valley, and addressed the Ukrainian conference by video link from Singapore. From that vantage point, the most pressing issue in the world today isn’t recession and political paralysis in the West, or even the rapid development and political transformation in emerging markets, it is the technology revolution that, in his view, is only getting started.

Here are some of the changes he sees as most significant:

The Internet revolution is the fastest economic change humans have experienced, and it is accelerating. Two billion people are online today, he noted; he predicts that number will double over the next decade.

The Internet is not just about connecting people, it is also about connecting machines, a phenomenon he dubbed “the Internet of things.” Five billion devices are connected today, he said; by 2020, he thinks more than 20 billion will be.

More information is being created than ever before. He asserted that as much information was created every 48 hours in 2010 as was created between the dawn of time and 2003. In 10 years, that much data will be generated every 60 minutes.

The result is the dominance of Internet platforms relative to traditional media, he said: “The largest newspaper in the United States is only reaching 1 per cent of the population ... That compares to Internet media, which is used by 25 per cent of the population daily and growing.”

Internet businesses are much more efficient than brick-and-mortar companies. This was one of his most striking observations, and a clue to the paradox of how we find ourselves simultaneously living in a time of what he views as unprecedented technological innovation but also high unemployment in the developed West. As Mr. Milner said: “Big Internet companies on average are capable of generating revenue of $1-million per employee, and that compares to 10 to 20 per cent of that which is normally generated by traditional offline businesses of comparable size.” As an illustration, he cited Facebook, where, he said, each single engineer supports one million users.

Finally – and Mr. Milner admitted this was “a bit of a futuristic picture” – he predicted “the emergence of the global brain, which consists of all the humans connected to each other and to the machine and interacting in a very unique and profound way, creating an intelligence that does not belong to any single human being or computer.”
Chrystia_Freeland  Yuri_Milner  e-commerce  Industrial_Internet  tech-utopianism  networks  connected_devices  platforms  collective_intelligence  efficiencies  inefficiencies 
october 2011 by jerryking
Augmented business;
Nov 6, 2010. | The Economist.Vol. 397, Iss. 8707; pg. 12 |
Anonymous.

The more data that firms collect in their core business, the more they
are able to offer new types of services. 3 trends stand out. First,
since smart systems provide better information, they should lead to
improved pricing and allocation of resources. Second, the integration of
the virtual and the real will speed up the shift from physical goods to
services that has been going on for some time. This also means that
more and more things will be hired instead of bought. Third, economic
value, having migrated from goods to services, will now increasingly
move to data and the algorithms used to analyse them. In fact, data, and
the knowledge extracted from them, may even be on their way to becoming
a factor of production in their own right, just like land, labour and
capital. That will make companies and governments increasingly
protective of their data assets.
sensors  ProQuest  Outsourcing  data_driven  services  augmented_reality  DaaS  factors_of_production  Industrial_Internet  data  algorithms  intangibles  core_businesses  resource_allocation  physical_assets  value_migration 
november 2010 by jerryking
A sea of sensors
Nov 6, 2010 | The Economist. Vol. 397, Iss. 8707; pg. 6 |
Anonymous. The main goal of smart systems is "to close the loop", in
the words of a report on the internet of things published in March by
the McKinsey Global Institute. This means using the knowledge gleaned
from data to optimise and automate all kinds of processes....Such
devices and smartphones are gradually turning people into the sensory
organs of the internet, say John Battelle, boss of Federated Media, an
online advertising agency, and Tim O'Reilly, who heads O'Reilly Media, a
publishing house. "Our cameras, our microphones, are becoming the eyes
and ears of the web," they write in a paper entitled "Web Squared".
ProQuest  sensors  massive_data_sets  crowdsensing  information_overload  Industrial_Internet 
november 2010 by jerryking
You Can Ignore 5 of These Trends: But Only 5 - Adam Smith, Esq.
24 August, 2010 | Adam Smith .
* Trend 1: Distributed cocreation moves into the mainstream
* Trend 2: Making the network the organization
* Trend 3: Collaboration at scale (jk: economies_of_scale)
* Trend 4: The growing 'Internet of Things'
* Trend 5: Experimentation an big data
* Trend 6: Wiring for a sustainable world
* Trend 7: Imagining anything as a service
* Trend 8: The age of the multisided business model
* Trend 9: Innovating from the bottom of the pyramid
* Trend 10: Producing public good on the grid
trends  McKinsey  Bruce_MacEwen  economies_of_scale  public_goods  Industrial_Internet  massive_data_sets  experimentation  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid 
august 2010 by jerryking
Why HP Thinks Sensors Will Lead to The Next Big Wave of Computing - NYTimes.com
By RICHARD MACMANUS of ReadWriteWeb
Published: May 28, 2010 "The basic premise of CeNSE is to create a
worldwide network of sensors that is connected to the Internet, which in
turn creates a feedback loop for objects and people. An example HP
often gives is putting thousands of sensors on a bridge, to measure
vibrations." "HP foresees services arising out of sensor data. If
traffic services were based on sensor data from bridges and roads, then
sensor data would allow companies to "build awareness" and perhaps even
deliver services that people will pay for. Consumers may be willing to
pay for the "best decision" about which route to take to a destination,
he explained. That decision would come from a combination of sensors in
the road and real-time analytics performed by HP, or a company that
processes the data."
HP  sensors  smart_infrastructure  analytics  wireless_networks  Industrial_Internet 
may 2010 by jerryking
IBM's Big Push into Business Consulting - BusinessWeek
April 16, 2009 | Business Week | by Steve Hamm

IBM sees rich opportunity to profit if it can help improve productivity
in sectors such as transportation, electric utilities, and health care.
"We're at the beginning of a new wave," says Kern. "We've begun to
instrument the world [with sensors and other devices that collect
information], but now we have to take that data and analyze it."
competingonanalytics  IBM  data_mining  analytics  sensors  Industrial_Internet  productivity  management_consulting 
april 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read