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jerryking : inflammation   10

25 Again? How Exercise May Fight Aging
The muscles of those who worked out looked like those of 25-year-olds and showed less of the inflammation that is tied to health problems as we age.
aging  exercise  inflammation  strength_training 
december 2019 by jerryking
How exactly does fat cause cancer?
July 22, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by PAUL TAYLOR.

our understanding of fat has gone through a huge transformation in recent years.

It was once thought that fat – medically known as adipose tissue – was just an inert collection of cells used for the storage of surplus calories, or energy, that we can draw upon in times of need.

But now medical experts realize that fat behaves almost like an organ – interacting with other parts of the body. It actually sends out signals that play a crucial role in regulating metabolism, the immune system and other functions. If we become overweight or obese, the normal running of the body can get knocked off balance by too many signals from fat.

There are several ways in which fat may contribute to the development of a variety of cancers:

(1) fat can be converted to estrogen – a hormone that is known to fuel the growth of some ovarian, endometrial (the membrane lining the uterus) and breast cancers.

(2) Fat also creates a state of chronic inflammation – another factor linked to cancer. The inflammatory process is associated with free radicals, unstable oxygen molecules that can damage DNA and cause potentially cancerous genetic mutations.

(3) excess weight often leads to a condition known as insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone that moves glucose (or sugar) from the blood stream into cells where it is used for energy. As the body’s cells become resistant to insulin, the pancreas responds by producing more and more of the hormone in an attempt to clear glucose from the bloodstream. Elevated levels of insulin and related substances – such as insulin-like growth factor-1 – stimulate cells to divide and multiply. This increased activity may lead to random genetic mutations that set the stage for cancer.

(4) People with excessive weight around the abdomen are prone to gastric reflux (or heartburn), in which digestive juices will back up into the tube connecting the mouth to the stomach. The constant irritation can damage cells and may lead to esophageal cancer.

(5) Dietary and lifestyle factors that may contribute to weight gain are also directly linked to an increased cancer risk. For example, diets rich in red meats and highly processed foods have been implicated in colorectal and other cancers.

People who tend to eat lots of fresh fruits and vegetables and whole grains are consuming a host of micronutrients that may help guard against cancer. Likewise, studies suggest that regular exercise may be protective, too.
cancers  colorectal  cured_and_smoked  diets  digestive_systems  exercise  fats  healthy_lifestyles  immune_system  inflammation  insulin  meat  metabolism  risk_factors 
july 2019 by jerryking
How to Get the Best From Your Immune System - Smarter Living Guides
2019 | The New York Times | By Matt Richtel.

**“An Elegant Defense: The Extraordinary New Science of the Immune System.”"

The immune system is much less about exercising power than it is about finding balance. You can help train and maintain it. Here’s how:
(A) What Is the Immune System?
Our great defense system helps ward off the most dangerous of invaders......It is a common misconception that the immune system goes to war with every foreign organism. That would lead to scorched earth, nuclear winter. Instead, the job of the immune system is to take stock, monitor, assess and judge potential threats...if an invader is deemed a threat, the immune system has a narrow job: destroy the threat while doing as little collateral damage as possible. This response from the immune system is called “inflammation.” .....inflammation can feel like a stuffy nose, sore throat, tummy ache, fever, fatigue or headache. Yes, the symptoms of an immune response feel lousy, but you must suffer a little to keep the rest of your body healthy over the long term. And for your health and daily well-being, the key is to keep your immune system from underperforming or getting out of hand.
(B) IT’S ABOUT BALANCE
The immune system, often seen as a ruthless defender, seeks a steady state, not a police state.....a fiercely delicate combination of a bouncer and a ballet dancer. In fact, many molecules in this complex system are designed to send a signal that it should withdraw, pause an attack and stand down. Without these molecules, the state of inflammation that helps destroy threats would lay your body to waste..... Instead of boosting your immune system, you should be supporting it. And you should try to never undermine its delicate structures.
(C) The Immune System and the Beast
Let's take a moment to understand how (and why) our immune system acts in the face of a threat.....Our immune system took shape roughly 480 million years ago. All jawed vertebrates going back to the shark share its key properties. One property is priority setting.....an acute threat, e.g. a lion attack, the body’s network focuses wholly on that threat....the body goes into an emergency state known colloquially as “fight or flight.” During these periods, the body fires off powerful chemicals, including:

Epinephrine, which creates a kind of high for the body to subvert fatigue.
Norepinephrine, which also helps to subvert fatigue.
Cortisol, which helps the body maintain essential functions, like blood flow.

When these hormones are at work, we can feel generally O.K.,but .... the release of these fight-or-flight hormones dampens our immune response. ...it causes the immune system to withdraw.
(D) WHY THE IMMUNE SYSTEM WITHDRAWS
During times of real, acute stress — like threat of being eaten by a lion — our bodies can ill afford to waste resources dealing with illness. Viruses and bacteria, while dangerous, pale in comparison to the gigantic beast with razor-sharp teeth chasing us across the savannah. In that moment, our body needs all our energy, non-essential functions be damned. Step one: survive lion. Step two: deal with head cold.
(E) Sleep Is a Magic Bullet
Both you and your immune system need rest. ...If you don’t sleep, you will die — sooner. Studies show that lack of sleep leads to premature death through diseases like cancer and heart disease, and the reasons have everything to do with the immune system,
(F) SLEEP KEEPS YOUR SYSTEM IN BALANCE
This might sound contradictory. How can sleep can weaken the immune system, but also lead to inflammation?

Your immune system does not work as a binary system. It is not either on or off. It is made up of many molecules that send different signals, some urging inflammation and others restraining it. Your goal is to create an environment that doesn’t require your immune system to lose its natural balance.

Sleeplessness tips your immune system out of balance, hinders homeostasis, and turns the once elegant system into reckless pinballs of powerful molecules bouncing off your body’s bumper rails, and sometimes through them.

More concretely, it is a hard pill to swallow knowing there is no pill to swallow. The most important steps to support your immune system require discipline and habit.
(G) Exercise, Food and Meditation
Ward off illness with these three staples of a healthy body. ...the best things you can do for yourself when you’re sick are rest, eat well, don’t turn little things into lions, and remember that your immune system, if given your support, will likely do a darn good job of keeping you at harmony with the world.
allergies  bacteria  books  defensive_tactics  exercise  food  habits  homeostasis  howto  immune_system  inflammation  meditation  mens'_health  mindfulness  priorities  self-discipline  sleep  sleeplessness  steady-state  threats  viruses 
june 2019 by jerryking
Berry Good for You
July/August 2013 | Everything Zoomer.com | Tara Losinski
fruits  healthy_lifestyles  diets  inflammation 
june 2013 by jerryking
HEALTH: The Anti-Inflammatory Diet : – Toronto Filipino Newspaper Serving the Greater Toronto Area
March 9, 2012 | The Philippine Reporter |By Dr. George I. Traitses.

What is the inflammatory process?

Inflammation can be good or bad. When it’s good, it’s a natural response by the body to cutting ourselves, for example. The immune system sends white blood cells and other substances to the site of the injury to get the healing process going.

Not all injuries to the body are as obvious as a cut finger, though. Stress can contribute to chronic inflammation, as well as a sedentary lifestyle. Our genes can increase the likelihood of chronic inflammation. So can exposure to a variety of toxins, including secondhand tobacco smoke. A wide variety of causes can bring about chronic—and invisible—inflammation.

Why should we be concerned?

A low-grade chronic inflammation damages blood vessels, which increases the likelihood of heart problems and auto-immune illnesses like lupus or rheumatoid arthritis. It has also been implicated in the development of certain cancers, in diabetes, and in stroke. Inflammation-related conditions include Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, as well as other age-related disorders.
diets  mens'_health  inflammation  osteoarthritis 
march 2012 by jerryking
Health Danger of Parties Past—Hepatitis C - WSJ.com
SEPT. 20, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By MELINDA BECK.
Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver, generally caused by viruses,
with symptoms ranging from slight to severe. Versions A through C are
the most common. * Hep A: Transmitted via contaminated water or food,
particularly in countries with poor hygiene. Hep B: 2 billion people
world-wide infected with hep B, mostly through infected blood or body
fluids. It can become chronic and lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer,
but most adults clear the virus without treatment and are then immune. *
Hep C: Spread by blood-to-blood transmission, with few symptoms either
in early stages or for decades later. About 20% of chronic cases develop
into cirrhosis or liver cancer. Curable in about 50% of cases by
chemotherapy. * Hep D: Caused by a small RNA virus that only propagates
in the presence of hep B, greatly increasing the chance of cancer,
cirrhosis and death. * Hep E: Transmitted by fecal-oral contamination in
unsanitary conditions.
hepatitis  mens'_health  Melinda_Beck  disease  viruses  inflammation  liver  taxonomy  hygiene  cancers 
september 2010 by jerryking

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