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jerryking : inland   5

How Canadian companies can tap into Asia’s consumer boom
Jun. 03 2013 | G&M | by DOMINIC BARTON.

Possible send to Earl Davis of Teachers.

To capture this opportunity, Canadian companies need an intimate understanding of the new Asian consumers. First, on the consumption and services front, they need to locate these consumers, with forensic precision....Second, Canadian companies need to understand the diverse and evolving tastes of Asian consumers. Across the region, the number of higher income households is rapidly expanding. These consumers are often young, are more international in their outlook, and are more willing to pay a premium for quality products. They consume more services, from education and health care to foreign travel....Third, Another significant opportunity for Canada is the provision and delivery of food, energy, and natural resources. By 2030, global demand for food is expected to rise by more than 25 per cent, mostly in Asia, and fertilizer demand will grow by 50 per cent.
Dominic_Barton  McKinsey  China  Canadian  target_marketing  consumer_behavior  shifting_tastes  China_rising  booming  Asia  Asian  Asia_Pacific  BRIC  middle_class  inland  affluence  infrastructure  forensics 
june 2013 by jerryking
Swallowing Rain Forest, Brazilian Cities Surge in Amazon - NYTimes.com
November 24, 2012 | NYT | By SIMON ROMERO.

The Amazon has been viewed for ages as a vast quilt of rain forest interspersed by remote river outposts. But the surging population growth of cities in the jungle is turning that rural vision on its head and alarming scientists, as an array of new industrial projects transforms the Amazon into Brazil’s fastest-growing region....Of the 19 Brazilian cities that the latest census indicates have doubled in population over the past decade, 10 are in the Amazon. Altogether, the region’s population climbed 23 percent from 2000 to 2010, while Brazil as a whole grew just 12 percent....The soaring population growth in some cities in the Amazon — called the “world’s last great settlement frontier” by Brian J. Godfrey, a geography professor at Vassar College who is the co-author of “Rainforest Cities” — is intensifying an urbanization that has been advancing for decades.
Brazil  Amazon_forest  cities  urban  urbanization  deforestation  population_growth  economic_development  inland  affluence  internal_migration 
november 2012 by jerryking
Unknown Cities in Brazil and Russia Are Getting Richer -
September 30, 2010! BusinessWeek ! By Mehul Srivastava. A
growing middle class in lesser-known towns presents a huge opportunity
to marketers. Most multinationals build a large presence in the top 10
cities of emerging-market countries such as Brazil, China, India, and
Indonesia, so Rio, Shanghai, Delhi, and Jakarta get their
state-of-the-art autos, cell phones, and retailers. Yet this focus comes
at a cost. In a survey of multinationals, BCG found that most of the
companies ignored cities with smaller populations and less apparent
potential. Cities such as Aurangabad, Curitiba in Brazil, Xiaochang in
China, and Yekaterinburg in Russia get lumped together, BCG found, with
the mostly poor, rural populations that few companies, with notable
exceptions such as Unilever (UL), are eager to pursue. "The next billion
consumers, who are far above the poverty line, have high consuming
power, and they are just not coming onto people's radars," says Sharad
Verma, a partner at BCG.
BRIC  middle_class  inland  affluence  internal_migration  cities  BCG  unknowns 
october 2010 by jerryking
China's Inland Frontier Beckons - WSJ.com
MARCH 14, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | by JASON LEOW. Big,
Lesser-Known Cities Hold Growth Prospects For Foreign Firms. Even with
their weaker purchasing power, China's inland cities can be rich
pickings for companies that learn how to tap them. Accounting for 18% of
China's 1.3 billion people, cities that Beijing considers "tertiary" --
3rd and lower -- generated 43% of the nation's GDP in 2004. By
contrast, 9% of Chinese live in what are considered 1st- and 2nd-tier
cities, which contributed 34% of GDP in 2004..."Although China's
National Tourism Administration has rated Days Hotel and Suites Jiaozuo
as five-star, the price for each room, at the opening, will be around
320 yuan, or about $41, less than half of what many peer hotels in major
cities charge. The low price is pegged to local spending power... the
hotel has resorted to cost-containing measures such as smaller rooms
than are standard for 5-star facilities and marble imported from the
Middle East rather than Italy."
China  Wal-Mart  IBM  hotels  internal_migration  inland 
march 2010 by jerryking

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