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jerryking : intellectual_exploration   3

On campus, it’s good to be bothered by a diversity of ideas - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Sep. 05, 2016

consider the advice U.S. President Barack Obama gave last spring to the graduating class of Howard University, a historically black college in Washington, D.C.

“Don’t try to shut folks out, don’t try to shut them down, no matter how much you might disagree with them,” Mr. Obama said in May. “There will be times when you shouldn’t compromise your core values, your integrity and you will have the responsibility to speak up in the face of injustice. But listen. Engage. If the other side has a point, learn from them. If they’re wrong, rebut them. Teach them. Beat them on the battlefield of ideas. And you might as well start practising now, because one thing I can guarantee you, you will have to deal with ignorance, hatred, racism, foolishness, trifling folks … at every stage of your life.”

Better yet, students should, in Prof. Levinovitz’s words, see university as a “boot camp, not a hotel.” You’re there to toughen up for real life, not shield yourself from its infuriating injustices, painful conflicts and, yes, even the Donald Trumps of this world. Because they’re everywhere.
Konrad_Yakabuski  Colleges_&_Universities  diversity  ideas  intellectual_exploration  political_correctness  censorship  political_orthodoxy  free_speech  hate_speech  safe_spaces  civility  polarization  intellectual_diversity  disagreements  argumentation  heterogeneity  core_values 
september 2016 by jerryking
Is Stanford Too Close to Silicon Valley? :
APRIL 30, 2012 | The New Yorker | BY KEN AULETTA.

"Kathleen Chaykowski, a junior, was a premed and an engineering major who switched to English, and last year was the editor-in-chief of the Stanford Daily. She spoke about the risk-taking that is integral to Silicon Valley. “My academic adviser said, ‘I want you to have a messy career at Stanford. I want to see you try things, to discover the parts of yourself that you didn’t know existed.’ ”"
education  experimentation  Stanford  Silicon_Valley  academia  innovation  intellectual_exploration  technology  messiness  risk-taking  self-discovery 
may 2014 by jerryking
What Should African-American Studies Students Learn?
October 1, 2009 | The New Republic | by John McWhorter.

This piece is simply a call for a true African-American Studies paradigm: a study of black people entire, with ample room for views from all sides. Black conservatives should be read alongside Du Bois and Baldwin, with no clucking and hedging. Any hovering consensus that leftist positions are “truth” should be a mark of failure.

Here is what I would hope to see in the wake of what I write.

Since I started writing and speaking on race in 2000, it has been typical that when I am invited to speak at a university by an African-American Studies department, often I am expected to yield some time to someone assigned to give a riposte--i.e. speak up for the usual leftist line. That is, the inviters pride themselves on being open-minded enough to hear me out, but consider it the duty of good-thinking folk to provide, shall we say, “balance.”

But then, when “proper”-thinking black writers are invited to speak, there is no sense that their talk is incomplete without a “conservative” person spending fifteen minutes having their say.

African-American Studies departments typically see themselves as doing their jobs in harboring a “controversial” speaker, partly out of a wan gesture towards true intellectual engagement, but equally as much because they know that person will, because of shock value, fill seats.

However, they are not engaged in true exploration, in the intellectual sense, until they can process the “controversial” speaker as simply, and only, a speaker, with one view among many. And, if articulate enough to merit invitation, worthy of engagement without some “right-minded” black faculty member dragged in as a “corrective.”

In an African-American Studies department of the kind I suggest, speakers and teachers of all walks would be permitted--note: not just conservative ones--and students would be able to come to their own conclusions. That is, be educated in the true sense.
academia  African-Americans  black_studies  Colleges_&_Universities  curriculum  heterogeneity  intellectual_exploration  intellectual_diversity  John_McWhorter  students  syllabus  victimhood 
october 2009 by jerryking

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