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jerryking : interdisciplinary   12

What to Learn in College to Stay One Step Ahead of Computers - NYTimes.com
MAY 22, 2015 | NYT | By ROBERT J. SHILLER.

The successful occupations, by this measure, shared certain characteristics: People who practiced them needed complex communication skills and expert knowledge. Such skills included an ability to convey “not just information but a particular interpretation of information.” They said that expert knowledge was broad, deep and practical, allowing the solution of “uncharted problems.”

These attributes may not be as beneficial in the future. But the study certainly suggests that a college education needs to be broad and general, and not defined primarily by the traditional structure of separate departments staffed by professors who want, most of all, to be at the forefront of their own narrow disciplines.....In a separate May 5 statement, Prof. Sean D. Kelly, chairman of the General Education Review Committee, said a Harvard education should give students “an art of living in the world.”

But how should professors do this? Perhaps we should prepare students for entrepreneurial opportunities suggested by our own disciplines. Even departments entirely divorced from business could do this by suggesting enterprises, nonprofits and activities in which students can later use their specialized knowledge....I continue to update the course, thinking about how I can integrate its lessons into an “art of living in the world.” I have tried to enhance my students’ sense that finance should be the art of financing important human activities, of getting people (and robots someday) working together to accomplish things that we really want done.
21st._century  automation  Colleges_&_Universities  college-educated  Communicating_&_Connecting  continuing_education  continuous_learning  curriculum  education  entrepreneurship  expertise  finance  future-proofing  generalists  Harvard  indispensable  interdisciplinary  interpretation  machine_learning  Managing_Your_Career  new_graduates  Robert_Shiller  skills  students  syllabus  uncharted_problems  Yale 
may 2015 by jerryking
Starting Up in High Gear
July-August 2000 | HBR |An Interview with Vinod Khosla by David Champion and Nicholas G. Carr.

To create the kind of new wealth you’re talking about, we’re going to have to see massive investments in information technology. Where’s the money going to come from?

It’s going to come out of corporate budgets. Companies invest wherever they’re going to get the biggest returns, and right now that’s IT. Look at the trend in capital expenditures. Twenty years ago, information technology accounted for about 10% of capital expenditures in the United States. ...
Today, if you have a plan for a new business, you circulate it in the venture community and you get funded in a week. What you don’t get is an honest, painstaking critique. What are the downsides in your plan? What are the shortcomings? What are the weak links? The strengths of your idea get a lot of attention, but the weaknesses get ignored—and ultimately it’s the weaknesses of your plan that will kill you. A start-up is only as strong as its weakest link....
The first thing we focused on was getting the right set of people for the company—the right gene pool. We started out on the technical end. Pradeep had helped architect the Ultrasparc processor at Sun, so he had strong skills in building technical architectures and could apply those skills to routers. But he needed somebody with experience in building and operating an IP network, and he needed somebody who’d done operating systems software for routers and somebody who’d done protocols for routers. So we drew out a map that said, “Here are the ten different areas of expertise we need.” Then we made a list of the companies doing the best work in each area, and we listed the five people in each company who would make good targets. We went after those people, and piece by piece we assembled a multidisciplinary team that could make Juniper a leader.
IT  interviews  HBR  Kleiner_Perkins  start_ups  large_companies  management_consulting  Vinod_Khosla  executive_search  shortcomings  weaknesses  new_businesses  CAPEX  weak_links  Nicholas_Carr  talent_acquisition  gene_pool  expertise  team_risk  wealth_creation  cross-pollination  interdisciplinary  teams  protocols 
june 2012 by jerryking
How outsiders solve problems that stump experts
May. 02, 2012 | The Globe and Mail| by ERIN MILLAR Special to Globe and Mail Update.

“Radical innovations often happen at the intersections of disciplines,” write Dr. Karim Lakhani and Dr. Lars Bo Jeppesen, of Harvard Business School and Copenhagen Business School respectively, in the Harvard Business Review. “The more diverse the problem-solving population, the more likely a problem is to be solved. People tend to link problems that are distant from their fields with solutions that they've encountered in their own work.”....“We assume that technical problems can be solved only by people with technical expertise,” writes Jonah Lehrer, who discusses InnoCentive in his new book Imagine: How Creativity Works. “But that assumption is wrong. The people deep inside a domain – the chemists trying to solve a chemistry problem – often suffer from a type of intellectual handicap. It's not until the challenge is shared with motivated outsiders that the solution can be found.
creativity  heterogeneity  innovation  polymaths  problem_solving  InnoCentive  books  Jonah_Lehrer  cross-pollination  interdisciplinary  outsiders  intellectual_diversity  moonshots  breakthroughs  industry_expertise 
may 2012 by jerryking
The Future of the Future
September 30, 2005 |Special to the Toronto Star | By Alan Webber.

From Toronto to Tokyo, from Copenhagen to Chicago, from San Paulo to San Francisco—in virtually every major city in every industrialized country in the world—leaders of business, government, and not-for-profits are preoccupied with the same fundamental question: What do we need to do to compete successfully in the economy of the future?...it’s not hard to locate the source of so much economic soul-searching spread over so many historically prosperous countries. Most observers could cull their list of explanations to two simple words: China, India.

there are four additional revolutions going on that all of us must attend to if we want to shape our future, and not simply watch it shape us.
Briefly, the four are:
􀂗 The convergence of politics, religion, and culture as a powerful force for national and international identity and change.
􀂗 The transformational power of technology, and in particular, bio-technology and the new sciences.
􀂗 The revolution in art and self-expression.
􀂗 The global search for personal meaning.

Some of the operating rules that we can apply as we participate in the creation of our own future.
(1) innovation and creativity are the coin of the realm; talent,
diversity, design, and leadership are the metals that make up that coin.
(2) If we want to see the future, we will have to ask the right questions about it...Leif Edvinsson, the world’s first professor of Intellectual Capital, is pioneering a new field: “quizzics”—the art of asking the right question, the right way, because in every field, the question we ask will determine the answer we get.
(3) The future will be created in the interplay of these five revolutions, and at the boundaries of discrete disciplines. Most of us are trained in one profession, one discipline, one career; most of us are rewarded for our expertise in that one area. And yet, increasingly, the future that is emerging requires cross-disciplinary thinking, the ability to work across categories and at the boundaries of expertise.
asking_the_right_questions  intellectual_capital  future  trends  China  India  rules_of_the_game  innovation  creativity  soul-searching  cross-pollination  interdisciplinary  cross-disciplinary  questions 
may 2012 by jerryking
Mining entrepreneur's university donation digging for ‘renaissance engineers’ - The Globe and Mail
james bradshaw
From Tuesday's Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Nov. 01, 2011

“renaissance engineers.” ---It’s a term he credits to his late wife, who saw the engineer of the future not just as a problem solver or functionary builder, but a sort of modern Michelangelo – expert and agile in more than one discipline, but also eager to consider and communicate how engineering relates to matters of sustainability, health, safety and civil society.

“You are an engineer, but at the same time you are an artist and you have to be able to tell the world how what you’re doing is going to benefit the world,”
York_University  interdisciplinary  mining  entrepreneur  Pierre_Lassonde  philanthropy  engineering  renaissance  Renaissance_Man  Colleges_&_Universities  moguls  Seymour_Schulich 
november 2011 by jerryking
Meeting Global Challenges | U of T Cross Disciplinary Innovation | By David Naylor | University of Toronto Magazine
Summer 2011 | |By David Naylor.

U of T is teaching future leaders to think creatively across disciplines
Canada must have universities that can do two related things: conduct the advanced research that will help surmount the grand challenges that humanity now faces, and offer the best and brightest students an education that will help them build a more successful nation and a better world. No university in Canada is better positioned to meet those objectives.
uToronto  Colleges_&_Universities  interdisciplinary  cross-cultural  David_Naylor  students  the_best_and_brightest 
november 2011 by jerryking
Institutional Challenges of Interdisciplinary Research Centers
Fall 2007 | Journal of Research Administration. Washington:
Vol. 38, Iss. 2 | Sherry Glied, Suzanne Bakken, Allan Formicola,
Kristine Gebbie, Elaine L Larson.
interdisciplinary  ProQuest  Colleges_&_Universities  research  Freshbooks 
june 2011 by jerryking
Start-Up U | U of T Culture of Innovation, Commercialization of Research in Toronto
Autumn 2010 | University of Toronto Magazine | By David Naylor. U of T is helping to create a culture of innovation
By David Naylor
start_ups  uToronto  MaRS  commercialization  innovation  entrepreneurship  interdisciplinary  incubators  David_Naylor 
november 2010 by jerryking
Grove Backs an Engineer’s Approach to Medicine
May 17, 2010 | Bits Blog - NYTimes.com | by ANDREW POLLACK.
Mr. Grove has pledged $1.5 million so that the University of California
campuses in San Francisco and Berkeley can start a joint master’s degree
program aimed at so-called translational medicine — the process of
turning biological discoveries into drugs and medical devices that can
help patients.

The idea is to expose students to both the engineering prowess of
Berkeley and the medical research of San Francisco to train a new breed
of medical innovator. “What we have learned from decades of rapid
development of information technology is that the key is relentless
focus on ‘better, faster, cheaper’ — in everything,’’ Mr. Grove said in a
statement. “The best results are achieved through the cooperative
efforts of different disciplines, all aimed at the same objective.”
Andy_Grove  medical  innovation  cheap_revolution  interdisciplinary  medicine  engineering  medical_devices 
may 2010 by jerryking
The Boom Is Over. Long Live the Art! - NYTimes.com
February 12, 2009 NYT article By HOLLAND COTTER. The economic
downturn will force a new mindset on the art industry. Make art schools
interdisciplinary, complete with work terms in unorthodox locales (e.g.
prisons, hospitals, etc.). The 21st century will almost certainly see
consciousness-altering changes in digital access to knowledge and in the
shaping of visual culture. What will artists do with this?
artists  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  innovation  creativity  visual_culture  markets  rethinking  reinvention  fine_arts  interdisciplinary  unconventional_thinking  creative_renewal  21st._century  mindsets  unorthodox  cross-disciplinary  cross-pollination  workplaces 
february 2009 by jerryking

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