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How to Talk to People, According to Terry Gross
Nov. 17, 2018 | The New York Times | By Jolie Kerr.

(1) “Tell me about yourself,” a.k.a the only icebreaker you’ll ever need.
(2) The secret to being a good conversationalist? Curiosity.
(3) Be funny (if you can). “A good conversationalist is somebody who is fun to talk to,” she said. Ms. Gross, it’s worth noting, is very funny. If you can’t be funny, being mentally organized, reasonably concise and energetic will go a long way in impressing people.
(4) Preparation is key. “It helps to organize your thoughts beforehand by thinking about the things you expect you’ll be asked and then reflecting on how you might answer,” think through where your boundaries are, so that you’re not paralyzed agonizing over whether you’re willing to confide something or not.”

In a job interview, organizing your thoughts by thinking about the things you expect you’ll be asked and reflecting on how you might answer can help you navigate if things start to go badly.
(5) Take control by pivoting to something you want to talk about.
(6) Ms. Gross doesn’t want you to dodge questions. But if you’re going to, here’s how: Say, “I don’t want to answer that,” or, if that’s too blunt, hedge with a statement like, “I’m having a difficult time thinking of a specific answer to that.” Going the martyr route with something like, “I’m afraid by answering that I’m going to hurt somebody’s feelings and I don’t want to do that,” is another option.
(7) Terry pays attention to body language. Be like Terry.
(8) When to push back, and when not to.
body_language  Communicating_&_Connecting  conversations  curiosity  howto  humour  interviews  interview_preparation  job_search  preparation  tips  nonverbal  posture  ice-breakers  concision  Managing_Your_Career  pay_attention 
november 2018 by jerryking
David Ignatius — Charlie Rose
11/07/2017 | Charlie Rose Show|

David Ignatius, columnist for The Washington Post, talks about Saudi Arabia, President Trump's China visit, and his new spy novel, Quantum Spy.
G-2  China  Saudi_Arabia  David_Ignatius  U.S.-China_relations  U.S.foreign_policy  Charlie_Rose  interviews  security_&_intelligence  authors  books  quantum_computing  novels  fiction  CIA 
november 2017 by jerryking
Live Interviews With C.E.O.s of Uber, AT&T and More: DealBook Conference - The New York Times
NOV. 9, 2017 | New York TImes | By DEALBOOK.

Why the new DealBook is your must-read.

Over the past several years, business has become inextricably linked with policy — in Washington, in Brussels, in Beijing — like never before. That’s why we’re reimagining DealBook with a renewed focus on the intersection of these crosscurrents, as well as a broader frame on the world of business to include technology, innovation, philanthropy and corporate governance.

DealBook will aim to identify, curate and prioritize the most critical information, providing a trusted one-stop-shop for the business and policy developments that matter. You’ll also be able to read the live, updated DealBook report here.

And yes, we’re still covering the world of deals as much as ever before. (You may have notice we’ve been subtly experimenting with this evolution in coverage over the past couple of months.)

Many of you — some 300,000-plus subscribers to our newsletter alone — have been with us since the very beginning. Thank you.

We would love to hear your feedback. And if you like what you see, we’d be grateful if you would recommend us to a friend or co-worker.

Thanks for your support.
conferences  Andrew_Sorkin  CEOs  interviews  Colin_Kaepernick 
november 2017 by jerryking
Successful people act quickly when things go wrong - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Aug. 02, 2015

Productivity

Pivot quickly to maximize success
Airplanes are off course 90 per cent of the time but incessantly correct their direction, . Similarly, successful people correct their course quickly when off-kilter. They also set short timelines, have small daily to-do lists and drop stuff that isn’t working. Lifehack.org

Branding

Learn from but don’t live in the past
It’s great to know your company history but senseless to live in the past,Your company’s history is valuable only if customers and prospective clients believe it defines your brand and success, and differentiates you from competitors. If it doesn’t, build a new history.

Leadership

Pre-empt attacks with regular audits
To pre-empt an activist investor’s attack, eliminate financial and operational underperformance. Conduct regular vulnerability audits, looking at factors such as how earnings per share, profit and price-to-earnings ratios in the past 18 months compare with peers. If necessary, create an aggressive turnaround plan. ChiefExecutive.net

Human resources

Ask potential hires where they’ll go next
It sounds weird, but LinkedIn asks potential employees what job they want to have next after they leave the company. Founder Reid Hoffman says it signals the intent to have a huge impact on the individual’s career, helping to develop them for whatever they choose, and invites honesty. Vox.com

Tech tip

Use phone’s camera as portable copier
Productivity blogger Mark Shead recommends using your phone’s camera as a portable copy machine/scanner when on the road, photographing paperwork, train schedules or other information. Many new camera phones have the resolution to provide readable copies. Productivity 501.com
branding  productivity  human_resources  leadership  Harvey_Schachter  character_traits  habits  pre-emption  course_correction  Reid_Hoffman  career_paths  beforemath  overachievers  affirmations  pivots  audits  signals  vulnerabilities  hiring  interviews  high-achieving 
august 2015 by jerryking
Mastering the Art of Problem Solving
When President Bill Clinton chose to intervene in the Somali civil war in 1993, the Battle of Mogadishu resulted in thousands of Somali citizens killed, two American Black Hawk helicopters shot down,…

WHAT ABOUT THE DATA?
Increasing amounts of data can be unmanageable, and the problem of sorting through data overloads may only worsen in this digital era. Rather than looking at each bit of information as a discrete data point, we want to look at our drivers and sort the data according to which driver it supports--on other words, sort the data into each of the half-dozen or so driver categories, so analysts have few piles to deal with rather than a thousand discrete data points.
decision_making  howto  problem_solving  problem_framing  security_&_intelligence  CIA  books  information_overload  analysis  interviews  critical_thinking  book_reviews  Philip_Mudd  frameworks  insights  sorting  analysts  thinking_backwards  problem_definition  intelligence_analysts 
may 2015 by jerryking
What not to ask about at a job interview - The Globe and Mail
EILEEN DOOLEY
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Feb. 03 2015
interviews  Managing_Your_Career  job_search 
february 2015 by jerryking
How to make the leap to the VP’s seat - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL SHERAR
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Dec. 03 2014

Like everything that is worthwhile doing, a promotion to VP requires hard work, lengthy preparation and thoughtfulness. Challenge yourself to view things from a higher perspective starting from how your own work is helping to drive a broader organizational strategy and how it can be leveraged to support other parts of the organization. Take this type of thinking to the interview and then into your new role as a VP and you can help your organization scale new heights.
howto  executive_management  movingonup  leadership  interviews  hard_work  companywide 
december 2014 by jerryking
Roger Ferguson of TIAA-CREF: Always Act as if You’re an Owner - NYTimes.com
NOV. 29, 2014 | NYT | Adam Bryant.
Is there a value on your list that is particularly important to you?

One is about personal accountability. One of the phrases I use is that if you owned this company, what would you do? And if your colleagues were owners, what would you want them to do?

What are your best interview questions?

What do you do with your free time? I’m listening for somebody who is a little more balanced. I’m always asking about team experiences, and about resilience and fortitude. How did you recover from setbacks? What did you do? I like to hear stories, and concrete examples.

What career and life advice do you give to graduating college students?

You have to be prepared to take some risks and maybe fail a little bit. Don’t make the same mistake over and over again, but don’t be afraid of making any mistakes. Because your career is like a climbing wall, not a ladder, and you don’t know where it’s going to end up. You have to be a continuous learner as you go up the wall.
money_management  pension_funds  setbacks  CEOs  African-Americans  McKinsey  Managing_Your_Career  advice  new_graduates  values  accountability  interviews  TIAA-CREF  Harvard  owners 
december 2014 by jerryking
Q&A: Tips From a Serial Job Interviewer - At Work - WSJ
Jun 10, 2014| WSJ |By ADAM RUBENFIRE.

WSJ: Over the course of 100 interviews, you’ve been asked a lot of questions. Which ones caught you by surprise?

Faruqi: The ones that caught me by surprise were the ones that were either really good or really bad. Some of the best that I’ve been asked were: “What values did you grow up with? What makes you proud of who you are?” Also, “What’s the most exaggerated point on your résumé?”
interview_preparation  job_search  questions  interviews  hiring  financial_services  Wall_Street  Wharton  alumni 
june 2014 by jerryking
How I Hire: The Case Study Interview
September 24, 2013 | LinkedIn | by Kevin ChouInfluencer, CEO, co-founder at Kabam
case_studies  interviews  LinkedIn  hiring 
april 2014 by jerryking
How to Get a Job at Google, Part 2 - NYTimes.com
APRIL 19, 2014 | NYT| Thomas L. Friedman.

(1) “The first and most important thing is to be explicit and willful in making the decisions about what you want to get out of this investment in your education.”
(2) make sure that you’re getting out of it not only a broadening of your knowledge but skills that will be valued in today’s workplace. Your college degree is not a proxy anymore for having the skills or traits to do any job.

What are those traits? One is grit, he said. Shuffling through résumés of some of Google’s 100 hires that week, Bock explained: “I was on campus speaking to a student who was a computer science and math double major, who was thinking of shifting to an economics major because the computer science courses were too difficult. I told that student they are much better off being a B student in computer science than an A+ student in English because it signals a rigor in your thinking and a more challenging course load. That student will be one of our interns this summer.”

“What you want to do is say: ‘Here’s the attribute I’m going to demonstrate; here’s the story demonstrating it; here’s how that story demonstrated that attribute.’ ” And here is how it can create value. (Apply this also to cover letters).
howto  job_search  Google  Tom_Friedman  Lazlo_Bock  attributes  cognitive_skills  creativity  liberal_arts  résumés  new_graduates  coverletters  hiring  Managing_Your_Career  talent  grit  interviews  interview_preparation  value_creation  Jason_Isaacs  Asha_Isaacs  Jazmin_Isaacs 
april 2014 by jerryking
Life’s Work: Sandra Day O’Connor
December 2013 | Harvard Business Review |Interviewed by Alison Beard .
HBR  U.S._Supreme_Court  women  lawyers  mentoring  interviews  civics  judges  Sandra_Day_O'Connor 
december 2013 by jerryking
Malcolm Gladwell explains how being the underdog can give people a leg up
Oct. 05 2013 | The Globe and Mail | JARED BLAND.

Malcolm Gladwell's latest hypothesis is quite simple: What if being disadvantaged, being an underdog, is actually an advantage? As usual, Mr. Gladwell illustrates his argument with lots of fascinating studies and charming stories. But, unlike his previous books, David and Goliath feels especially resonant, perhaps because it arrives at a moment – of income inequality, government shutdowns, the Tea Party, the Occupy movement – when disadvantage is an ever-present reality.

Your book abounds with convincing and moving stories that demonstrate your central points. But there must be lots of exceptions – students who did really well in tiny classrooms, or dyslexics whose lives are constant struggles. What lessons did you learn from them?

The interesting question is what distinguishes the people who overcome adversity from the people who don’t. A lot of it has to do with the magnitude of the adversity. With the stories of the dyslexics who made it, they’re all intelligent people from middle-class homes. You’re not looking at people who have multiple sources of disadvantage. They have one basic source of disadvantage. Every single one of the successful dyslexics I talked to had one person in their life, at least, who always believed in them – their grandmother, a teacher along the way. They all came back to this one person. So that’s also a minimum condition for making it: You can’t have seven problems, obstacles. When you look at those who don’t make it, what you see is the multiplication of problems, the severity of problems.
interviews  Malcolm_Gladwell  underdogs  books  disadvantages  adversity  dyslexics  grit  multiple_stressors  obstacles 
october 2013 by jerryking
Before the Job Interview, Do Your Homework - NYTimes.com
June 1, 2013 | NYT | By EILENE ZIMMERMAN

“Know the major industry trends and news,” he says, and be able to talk about how they could affect the company.

Find out who runs the company and how they got there. “Look at their profiles on LinkedIn and see if you find a common bond,” says David Lewis, the chief executive of OperationsInc., a human resources outsourcing and consulting firm in Norwalk, Conn. “If you are able to say, ‘I went to the same college as you’ or ‘I also majored in psychology,’ that demonstrates you really did your homework.”

Familiarize yourself with the company’s products or services and look for ways, even small ones, to possibly expand or add value. Note the positives, then talk about opportunities you see, says Moses Lee, C.E.O. of Seelio, a platform that lets students and recent college graduates post samples of their work and search for jobs.
interview_preparation  interviews  Managing_Your_Career  due_diligence 
june 2013 by jerryking
Making Data Visible So You Can Act On It
December 11, 2012 | MIT Sloan Management Review |John Schulz (AT&T), interviewed by Nina Kruschwitz...

At AT&T, John Schulz, a director of sustainability operations, first had to make the company’s energy and water use data visible before the company could establish a program to reduce those numbers....The visibility of that data is what really drives behavior, because it’s shared with their peers, who the facility managers want to do well among, and with upper management. We found the scorecard model to be very useful, both for choosing the right points of data and then for making them visible. That was a real turning point for us.
data  sustainability  water_footprints  leadership  visibility  interviews  AT&T  energy  energy_efficiency  MIT  turning_points 
january 2013 by jerryking
All Fired Up in Massachusetts: The State’s New Wave of Big Data Companies
February 23, 2012 | MIT Sloan Management Review |Stephen O’Leary (Aeris Partners LLC), interviewed by David Kiron
Massachusetts  massive_data_sets  interviews  MIT  data_driven  analytics  healthcare 
january 2013 by jerryking
Making it in the '90s
April 1995 | Across the Board Vol. 32 Issue 4, p27 | Presents an interview with John P. Kotter
HBS  interviews  leadership  entrepreneurship  books  Managing_Your_Career  '90s 
december 2012 by jerryking
Picking the competition's brains for deal insight
September 2002 | Mergers and Acquisitions | Thomas E. Austin.

Focuses on the use of market research for acquisitions and mergers in the U.S. Types of market due diligence studies; Approaches for conducting market due diligence; Tips in interviewing competitors.
competitive_intelligence  due_diligence  interviews  M&A  market_research  mergers_&_acquisitions  tips 
september 2012 by jerryking
The polished interviewer
November 2002 | CA Magazine | Carolyn Cohen
interviews  howto 
september 2012 by jerryking
To Snag a Job, Learn to Find Your Faults - WSJ.com
May 2, 2006

To Snag a Job Offer, Learn What Damage You Do in Interviews

By JOANN S. LUBLIN
Managing_Your_Career  Joann_S._Lublin  interviews 
september 2012 by jerryking
Managing Your Career: Composure - WSJ.com
November 30, 2004

How Well You Handle Not Knowing Answers Is Key in Job Interviews

By JOANN S. LUBLIN
job_search  Joann_S._Lublin  interviews  international_marketing 
september 2012 by jerryking
In Tight Market, Job Candidates Must Upgrade Interview Skills - WSJ.com
May 21, 2002 |WSJ| By KRIS MAHER
Focus on Recruitment, Pay and Getting Ahead

Do your homework:
Be flexible:
Correct any negative impressions: candidates should ask, "What concerns do you have about my background?"
Highlight life experience:
job_search  interviews  interview_preparation 
september 2012 by jerryking
Did You Check With Counsel? Attorneys Growing Role In VC
January 1, 2003 | Venture Capital Journal | Interview of John Delaney and Jay Rand by Danielle Fugazy
lawyers  vc  venture_capital  start_ups  funding  interviews  boards_&_directors_&_governance  insurance 
september 2012 by jerryking
The Science of Interviewing
July-August 1990 | HBR | T.J. Rodgers is founder, president, CEO, and a director of Cypress

You can't hire quality people without a systematic approach to in interviewing. Four basic rules guide our interview and evaluation process.
1. Use the big guns.
2. Make interviews tough and demanding-even for people you know you want.
3. Interviews should lead to a detailed assessments of strengths and weaknesses, not vague impressions.
4. Check for cultural fit.
HBR  interviews  organizational_culture  assessments_&_evaluations  hiring  strengths  weaknesses  cultural_fit  howto  questions  stressful 
august 2012 by jerryking
How to Ace a Tough Interview
July 1994 | Working Woman | Stephen M. Pollan and Mark Levine. How to prepare for a stress interview.
decision_making  interview_preparation  interviews  Managing_Your_Career  howto  decision_trees 
august 2012 by jerryking
Thinking is difficult. Make time for it
Jul. 29 2012 | The Globe and Mail | by HARVEY SCHACHTER.
-----------------------------------------------------
Thinking is difficult. Make time for it

Schedule five blocks of 15 minutes in this week’s schedule for thinking, recommends productivity consultant Jason Womack. If it works, you may want more. The Womack Report.
-------------------------------------------------------------
A key question to gauge job applicants

Consultant Art Petty recommends using this question to probe candidates in job interviews: What are you doing to get better at what you do? ArtPetty.com
continuous_improvements  continuous_learning  Harvey_Schachter  hiring  interviews  interview_preparation  metacognition  productivity  questions  thinking 
july 2012 by jerryking
Martin Sorrell of WPP Group thinks companies need to get spending - WSJ.com
June 29, 2012|Wall Street Journal | Interview of Martin Sorrell by Alan Murray.

MR. MURRAY: Are you a concurrent indicator? A lagging indicator?

MR. SORRELL: We lead the downturn, and we lag the upturn. So, we get the worst of both worlds. If people are worried, they cut marketing spending. If things are going to turn up, they wait until they're confirmed.

Open Your Wallets
AUDIENCE MEMBER: Why do you think companies are sitting on too much cash?

MR. SORRELL: I started WPP with one other person 27 years ago. I decided to do something entrepreneurial. I borrowed £250,000 and bought into a shell company called Wire & Plastic Products, which is what WPP stands for, and wanted to build a very significant advertising and marketing-services company.

The system doesn't encourage people to take those sort of risks. Big corporations are natural bureaucracies, in the nicest sense of the word. Inherently, the system encourages conservatism.

To get out of where we are, you have to be expansive. Our strategy is simple: new markets, new media, consumer insight and then the ugly word, horizontality, getting people to work together. The first two involve taking risk. Myanmar opens up, 66 million people in that country. Major opportunity. You have to grasp it. We've gone in there in the first two weeks, repurchased an agency we had to sell because of sanctions, and we've gone in with our research operations.

When markets open up like that, you have to embrace the opportunities. I think the system doesn't encourage you to take those risks.
cash  economic_downturn  interviews  lagging_indicators  leading_indicators  Martin_Sorrell  origin_story  risk-taking  WPP 
june 2012 by jerryking
Starting Up in High Gear
July-August 2000 | HBR |An Interview with Vinod Khosla by David Champion and Nicholas G. Carr.

To create the kind of new wealth you’re talking about, we’re going to have to see massive investments in information technology. Where’s the money going to come from?

It’s going to come out of corporate budgets. Companies invest wherever they’re going to get the biggest returns, and right now that’s IT. Look at the trend in capital expenditures. Twenty years ago, information technology accounted for about 10% of capital expenditures in the United States. ...
Today, if you have a plan for a new business, you circulate it in the venture community and you get funded in a week. What you don’t get is an honest, painstaking critique. What are the downsides in your plan? What are the shortcomings? What are the weak links? The strengths of your idea get a lot of attention, but the weaknesses get ignored—and ultimately it’s the weaknesses of your plan that will kill you. A start-up is only as strong as its weakest link....
The first thing we focused on was getting the right set of people for the company—the right gene pool. We started out on the technical end. Pradeep had helped architect the Ultrasparc processor at Sun, so he had strong skills in building technical architectures and could apply those skills to routers. But he needed somebody with experience in building and operating an IP network, and he needed somebody who’d done operating systems software for routers and somebody who’d done protocols for routers. So we drew out a map that said, “Here are the ten different areas of expertise we need.” Then we made a list of the companies doing the best work in each area, and we listed the five people in each company who would make good targets. We went after those people, and piece by piece we assembled a multidisciplinary team that could make Juniper a leader.
IT  interviews  HBR  Kleiner_Perkins  start_ups  large_companies  management_consulting  Vinod_Khosla  executive_search  shortcomings  weaknesses  new_businesses  CAPEX  weak_links  Nicholas_Carr  talent_acquisition  gene_pool  expertise  team_risk  wealth_creation  cross-pollination  interdisciplinary  teams  protocols 
june 2012 by jerryking
13 simple journalist techniques for effective interviews | Matador Network
13 simple journalist techniques for effective interviews
By Sarah Stuteville On March 26, 2007
journalists  questions  interviews 
april 2012 by jerryking
P&G's Marketing Chief Looks to Go Digital - WSJ.com
March 13, 2012 | WSJ | By EMILY GLAZER.
P&G's Marketing Chief Looks to Go Digital
P&G  digital_media  interviews 
march 2012 by jerryking
Juicy in the Sky_pg. 2 of 2
July/August 2009 | THIS | Gordon Graff being interviewed about vertical farming.
cities  Toronto  skyscrapers  farming  sustainability  interviews  urban 
march 2012 by jerryking
Juicy in the Sky_pg. 1 of 2
July /August 2009 | THIS | Gordon Graff being interviewed on vertical farms.
cities  Toronto  skyscrapers  farming  sustainability  interviews  urban 
march 2012 by jerryking
Charlie Rose's Interview with Ray Dalio
October 20, 2011 | Charlie Rose Show | with Ray Dalio.

CHARLIE ROSE: And you always make a point that you know what you don`t know and that`s equally valuable.

RAY DALIO: More valuable. I want to say that -- so this is the whole philosophy. I -- I so, know that I can be wrong; and look, we all should recognize that we can be wrong. And if we recognize that we`re wrong and we worry about being wrong than what we should do is have a thoughtful dialogue....RAY DALIO: So the way I get to success. The way -- it`s not what I know. I`ve acquired some things that I know along the way and they`re helpful.

(CROSSTALK)

CHARLIE ROSE: It is -- it is -- it`s not what you know but it is --

(CROSSTALK)

RAY DALIO: It`s knowing what I don`t know or worrying that I won`t -- that I`ll be wrong that makes me find --

CHARLIE ROSE: Yes.

RAY DALIO: Well, I want people to criticize my point of view -- I want to hold down.

CHARLIE ROSE: Right.

RAY DALIO: Say I have a -- I think this but I may be wrong. And if you can attack what I`m saying -- in other words stress test what I`m saying -- I`ll learn....CHARLIE ROSE: And you have not been precise, and your assumptions are flawed.

RAY DALIO: Oh it`s so essential, right. There`s -- the -- the number one principle at our place is that if something doesn`t make sense to you, you have the right to explore it, to see if it makes sense.

I don`t want people around who do things that they don`t -- they don`t think makes sense because I`m going to have not-thinking people.

(CROSSTALK)

CHARLIE ROSE: Right.

RAY DALIO: So that they have not only the right, they have obligation. Don`t walk away thinking something`s wrong.

CHARLIE ROSE: Failure teaches you more than success?

RAY DALIO: Of course. One of my favorite books is "Einstein`s Mistakes."

CHARLIE ROSE: Right. And because it showed you that even Einstein, the most brilliant person of the century in common judgment made mistakes?

RAY DALIO: The great fallacy of all -- I think of all of mankind practically -- I mean that`s a big statement -- but the great fallacy is that people know more than what they do and there`s a discovery process and so when you look at -- that`s the process for learning.

The process for learning is to say "I don`t know." Like, I`m -- I`m totally comfortable being incompetent. If I -- if I -- I like being incompetent. I don`t mind being an incompetent. If I don`t -- how -- how much can you be competent about?

And so that whole notion of do you like learning? Do you like finding out what`s true and building on it without an ego? And that becomes the problem. How many statements do you listen to people that begin "I think this, I think that," where they should be asking "I wonder."
Ray_Dalio  interviews  truth-clarity  philanthropy  stress-tests  Charlie_Rose  truth-telling  Bridgewater  hedge_funds  deleveraging  organizational_culture  economics  unknowns  pretense_of_knowledge  Albert_Einstein  mistakes 
january 2012 by jerryking
HIRE LEARNING
22 Nov. 2006 | Report on Small Business | by Ken Hunt.

Finding the best people for the job takes time, money and focus.

(1) Know what you're looking for
(2) Consider how a new hire will fit into your company culture.
(3) Don't wait until you're desperate to hire.
(4)Use structured interviews.
(5) Ask behaviour-based questions.
(6) Get referrals.
(7) Check references and qualifications.
hiring  talent_management  interviews  personality_types/traits  small_business  referrals  reference-checking  references  cross-checking 
december 2011 by jerryking
FT.com / Columnists / Lucy Kellaway - ‘No one wants to hire my clever daughter’
By Lucy Kellaway

January 9 2007 17:28 | Last updated: January 9 2007

No, there is no point in asking for feedback. Most interviewers can’t or won’t explain their decisions, and why should they? They are not running a careers advice service and giving reasons simply invites future lawsuits.
Oxford  public_relations  hiring  feedback  interviews  decision_making  daughters 
october 2011 by jerryking
Back in the media game – unexpectedly - The Globe and Mail
richard blackwell
From Monday's Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, May. 01, 2011

As head of specialty channel behemoth Alliance Atlantis Communications Inc., Michael MacMillan was one of Canada's most powerful media moguls. He sold the company for $2.3-billion in 2007, generating a personal fortune, part of which he invested in a charitable foundation (Samara) and a winery (Closson Chase, in Ontario’s Prince Edward County, east of Toronto).
More from the At the Top archives

Staking out a farmland business
Regimes change but the work stays the same for SNC chief

Now, he's returned to the media business, having set up Blue Ant Media Inc. to take a stake in GlassBox Television Inc., a small outfit with a handful of specialty television channels and ambitious plans to distribute programming over the Internet and hand-held devices.
interviews  Alliance_Atlantis  media  digital_media  television 
october 2011 by jerryking
Dr. Wolfowitz, I Presume - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 24, 2005 | WSJ | By PAUL A. GIGOT.

Leon Louw, the South African economist, says that in the past 30 years the world has poured $450 billion of aid into Africa, but that average per capita income is lower than it was in the late 1960s. According to the World Bank's data, 39% of sub-Saharan Africa's private wealth was somewhere other than Africa in 1990 -- compared to 3% for South Asia, and only 10% even for Latin America.

Why invest in Africa if Africans won't? "It's a very fair question, and I think part of the answer is to deal with the kinds of regulations and taxes that I've been talking about," Mr. Wolfowitz says. "I'm absolutely sure that part of the answer is dealing with the corruption factor."
interviews  Paul_Wolfowitz  entrepreneurship  World_Bank  Africa  corruption  organizational_culture 
october 2011 by jerryking
Interview: The cellphone anthropologist
11 June 2008 | New Scientist | by Jason Palmer.

How do phones fit in?
The common denominator between cultures, regardless of age, gender or context is: keys, money and,
if you own one, a mobile phone. Why those three objects? Without wanting to sound hyperbolic,
essentially it boils down to survival. Keys provide access to warmth and shelter, money is a very
versatile tool that can buy food, transport and so on. A mobile phone, people soon realise, is a great
tool for recovering from emergency situations, especially if the first two fail.

What uses surprised you?
In a country like Uganda, most mobile phones are prepay. What we saw was that people are using their
phones as a kind of money transfer system. They would buy prepaid credit in the city, ring up a phone
kiosk operator in a village, read out the number associated with that credit so that the kiosk operator
could top up their own phone, then ask that the credit be passed on to someone in the village - say,
their sister - in cash....

With this level of informal innovation going on, can you bring anything extra to the table?
I'm not going to give you the bland corporate answer - "we do this research and then six months later a
product drops off the factory line that perfectly reflects our vision" - because the world is much messier
and more interesting than that. But, for instance, we did a study on phone sharing in Uganda and
Indonesia, and within a year - which is really quick when you're talking about hardware changes - we
had two products out which support multiple address books,
Nokia  interviews  anthropology  mobile_phones  UX  prepaid  emerging_markets  Uganda  credit  Jan_Chipcase  ethnography  Indonesia  anthropologists  insights  new_products 
october 2011 by jerryking
How to give it: J Christopher Flowers
13 Aug 2011 | Financial Times pg. 16. | Angus Watson, J
Christopher Flowers, 53, founded and runs the private equity investment
firm JC Flowers & Co. He donates through the JC Flowers Foundation,
is non-executive chairman of the malaria charity Nets for Life
(www.netsforlife africa.org) and a major donor to Christian Aid
(www.christianaid.org.uk).
ProQuest  private_equity  high_net_worth  philanthropy  interviews  charities  malaria  financiers 
august 2011 by jerryking
Insights with Sir Martin Sorrell
Q3 · 2011 | Think Quarterly by Google | by Simon Rogers. For
Sorrell, that lack of control is symptomatic of the new world. “I’m in a
business where there’s complete anarchy. You can’t control it – you can
only react to it. The control traditionally held over the msg. is gone.
Look at Wikileaks: we approach everything we write on the basis it’s
going to be on the front pg. of the newspaper.”...His business
increasingly revolves around mobile comms. & what they can offer the
client. WPP encourages its established brands to invest in mobile
talent, and exhorting its online agencies to embrace mobile in a more
aggressive way...“Mobile is part of the online revolution,” he says. The
side effect of all this is that “our willingness to sit down and dig
deep and reflect is diminishing because so much info is coming at such a
pace – literally 24/7. He continues. “People used to say that info. is
power but that’s no longer the case. It’s analysis of the data, its use –
that's the power.
innovation  mobile  Martin_Sorrell  brands  interviews  WPP  advertising_agencies  data  analysis 
august 2011 by jerryking
The Balding Man's Lifeline - WSJ.com
JULY 21, 2011 | | by SARAH E. NEEDLEMAN.

Hair Club: A Lifeline For the Balding Man
Sarah_E._Needleman  entrepreneur  interviews  mens'_health 
july 2011 by jerryking
TALK Larry Summers, Un-king of Kumbaya
Interview by ANDREW GOLDMAN
Published: May 12, 2011

You know, in meetings, I’m more focused on trying to figure out what the right answer is than making everybody feel validated. In Washington and at Harvard, that sometimes rubs people the wrong way
Larry_Summers  interviews 
may 2011 by jerryking
Charlie Rose - Reed Hastings
May 4, 2011 | Charlie Rose Show | Charlie Rose interviews Reed Hastings.
Charlie_Rose  Reed_Hastings  Netflix  web_video  interviews  streaming  movies  television 
may 2011 by jerryking
Irwin Simon of Hain Celestial, on Instilling Confidence - NYTimes.com
By ADAM BRYANT
Published: March 19, 2011
Corner Office: All Are Welcome at His Meetings. (That Means Interns, Too.)
CEOs  interviews  seasonings  condiments 
march 2011 by jerryking
Lunch with Charlie Rose. - By Gillian Tett - Slate Magazine
By Gillian Tett Posted Saturday, Jan. 29, 2011

He is particularly animated about a recent debate he staged on Afghanistan. “My job [on these shows] is just to ask questions, so with Afghanistan you have to ask: ‘Why are we [Americans] there? People say that we are there because of al-Qaeda, but there is no al-Qaeda in Afghanistan, they are in Pakistan! So then you have to say: ‘What are we going to do about Pakistan?’”

So what do you think America should do? I ask, conscious the issue is provoking heated debate. Over the years, Rose has built his career by extracting information from others; he himself never takes political sides on air. And, while it is widely assumed that he holds liberal views, he refuses to back any party – or policy – in public. “I don’t talk about my politics,” he explains. “I am registered as an independent.”

True to form, Rose orchestrates another twist in the conversation and asks how long I have been in New York. I explain that I got my current job 10 months earlier and that it feels “a huge privilege to be here at such a pivotal point in American history and the media”.

He nods enthusiastically. “I cannot imagine anything that I would rather do than have the opportunities I have now, to do interesting things – these opportunities coming out of the economic collapse, new administration, the recent [mid-term] elections, the fact that the Chinese president has come for a state visit ... ”.....So, I observe, you are the anti-Twitter!

He laughs, and explains that what he really wants to do in the next few years is to keep celebrating the concept of “conversation”. He is, for example, thinking of writing a book about “friendship”. He recently started keeping a diary that he hopes will act like an archaeological record of his spoken adventures. One of the reasons why he loves New York, he adds, is that a vast number of bright and ambitious people are crammed into such a small space that they – and their ideas – can constantly collide. And, of course, talk.

His ambitions could run further still. These days Oprah Winfrey is shaking the media world by creating not just a show that bears her name but an entire network too. “It would be wonderful to become what Oprah has become: she is in such a class of her own, as an entrepreneur, as a performer and an icon,” Rose admits. “The idea of building a series of programmes and choosing people that I think have talent to do them would be a very interesting idea. I would love to show that television can have soul, depth and range.”
Charlie_Rose  interviews  profile  Gillian_Tett 
february 2011 by jerryking
Head of eHarmony Seeks Something Long-Term - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 22, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By JOE LIGHT. Head
of Dating Site eHarmony, Greg Waldorf, Seeks Something Long-Term
online_dating  eHarmony  interviews 
november 2010 by jerryking
Geoff Vuleta Says 100-Day Plans Build Consistency - NYTimes.com
November 20, 2010 This interview with Geoff Vuleta, C.E.O. of
Fahrenheit 212, an innovation consulting firm in Manhattan, was
conducted and condensed by Adam Bryant.
CEOs  interviews  innovation  management_consulting 
november 2010 by jerryking
Currents: Tim Wu on Communication, Chaos, and Control
October 11, 2010 | : The New Yorker: | Jeffrey Toobin talks
with Tim Wu, a professor at Columbia Law School and the author of “The
Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires,” about how
forms of communication, from the telephone to the Internet, are
eventually controlled by monopolies; the battle between Apple and
Google; and the future of information technology.
web_video  interviews  monopolies  future  Tim_Wu  Information_Rules  competitive_landscape 
november 2010 by jerryking
How to prepare for strange interview questions
Aug. 9, 2010 | Fortune | Note to self: identify the value chain, identify their value proposition.
howto  interview_preparation  interviews 
november 2010 by jerryking
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