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jerryking : investigative_workups   2

Insider Trading Persists, and Gets Stealthier - NYTimes.com
By JAMES B. STEWART
Published: December 7, 2012

Why has insider trading proved so persistent, even in the face of prosecutions and popular Hollywood films like “Wall Street”?

The risk-versus-reward equation that has always been a factor in financial markets has changed drastically in the last 20 years....many people who work in financial markets “are highly skilled at cost-benefit analysis,” Mr. Bharara told me. “They’re highly intelligent. They’ve been to the best schools. They weigh the risk of getting caught against the potential reward, and they decide it’s worth the risk. We’re trying to tilt that equation.” There’s no doubt that the potential for gain “has soared,” Robert S. Khuzami, head of enforcement at the S.E.C., told me, and not because there are more takeovers and other market-moving events to trade on. “That’s a big change from the 1980s and ’90s. Hedge funds can take massive positions, use short-selling and derivatives, and employ trading techniques that aren’t transparent, and make huge amounts of money on small fluctuations on price. They don’t need to hit a home run on a $20 pop on a takeover announcement. These bets may be bunts and singles, but they get to the same place.”...The pressure to get an “edge,” as hedge fund traders often put it, has never been greater...In the wake of the Milken-Boesky era, the government has become sophisticated at monitoring major market-moving events like takeover announcements, to the point that insider trading on major corporate news has become relatively rare ...Although some critics say the S.E.C.’s expertise has lagged advances in areas like high-frequency trading, the enforcement division has made progress in monitoring suspicious trading. “We’ve created databases to see who is trading in tandem, even if you know nothing about an event,” Mr. Khuzami said. “It’s a trader-based approach, not an issuer-based approach. These trading patterns are the first clue to what might be insider trading rings. You then have to do the real detective work, pulling phone records and e-mails and using other techniques to uncover the links. ”
highly_skilled  insider_trading  Wall_Street  financiers  hedge_funds  Preet_Bharara  deterrence  Bay_Street  SEC  enforcement  patterns  misconduct  cost-benefit_analysis  slight_edge  trading  stealth  prosecutors  investigative_workups 
december 2012 by jerryking
Informed Patient - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 31, 2007 | WSJ | By LAURA LANDRO.

Talking Points: Making the Most Of Doctor Visits

* What going on? What ails you? What else could it be?
* Could two things be going on at once?" and "Are there any findings (from the physical exam, blood tests, x rays, etc.) that don't add up?"
* Is that the root problem or is that a symptom?

* Probabilistic reasoning is especially important in medical decision-making. Imagine, for example, your doctor tells you that you need to take a cholesterol-lowering drug. Most people would likely assent based on their physician’s recommendation, he says. But if you were to weigh the odds of that drug having a positive effect against the odds of experiencing side effects, you might find it wiser to decide otherwise.

“What I advocate is a more active role in medical care where you would say to the doctor, ‘Well, what are the chances that I’ll benefit from it? How many people take this medication with no benefit?’” Levitin says. Although doctors tend to be trained to think in terms of diagnosing and treating illnesses, they are not typically trained to think probabilistically, he adds. This becomes problematic when faced with the latest treatment options with questionable odds of a cure. “The way medical care is going in this country and in other countries, I think we need to become more proactive about knowing which questions to ask and working through the answers.”

Questions when you're concerned that you're facing a misdiagnosis (cbc Dr. Danielle Martin)
* OK....then in your opinion, what should be the normal progression of the diseases from this point onwards?
* What signs should we look for that tell us that it's time to return to the emergency room?
* Q: when should we come back.....if the flu how should case typically progress ? What are the signs that something is wrong and you should come back to the emergency room?
* what is the most likely course, when should we come back if there is a deviation?
*
medical  physicians  appointments  visits  Communicating_&_Connecting  tips  advice  Laura_Landro  doctors  doctor's_visits  questions  root_cause  symptoms  probabilities  simultaneity  investigative_workups  multiple_stressors  dual-consciousness  medical_communication  misdiagnosis  warning_signs 
november 2011 by jerryking

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