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jerryking : jargon   10

Thomas Friedman’s Guide to Hanging On in the ‘Age of Accelerations’ - Bloomberg
by Paul Barrett
November 11, 2016,

Thank You for Being Late: An Optimist’s Guide to Thriving in the Age of Accelerations (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, $28)....the wisdom of pausing.... take time “to just sit and think”— a good reminder for the overcommitted.....Friedman's “core argument,” is his description of our disruptive times. By “accelerations,” he means the increases in computing power, which are enabling breakthroughs from 3D printing to self-driving cars. Meanwhile, globalization is creating vast wealth for those who capitalize on innovation and impoverishment for populations who don’t. All of this sped-up economic activity contributes to rising carbon levels, feeding the climate change that threatens civilization.....Friedman relishes catchphrases like “the Big Shift,” borrowed in this case from the HBR. He deploys B-school jargon to explain it, but the definition boils down to companies making the move from relying exclusively on in-house brainpower, patents, and data to exploiting “flows” of knowledge from anywhere in the world.... Friedman makes the case for changed policies to respond to the accelerations he chronicles.
accelerated_lifecycles  sustained_inquiry  Tom_Friedman  books  slack_time  reflections  3-D  globalization  impoverishment  climate_change  in-house  talent_flows  information_flows  GE  prizes  bounties  innovation  contests  contemplation  patents  data  brainpower  jargon  thinking  timeouts  power_of_the_pause 
january 2017 by jerryking
Do you know the value of what you’re selling? Many sales reps don’t - The Globe and Mail
TIBOR SHANTO
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Mar. 25, 2016

There are two questions I ask of sales people that confirm this. The first is “Why do people buy from you and your company?” The answers I get are not only underwhelming, but often indistinguishable from other companies in their sectors. The answers are generic and usually communicate the vendors’ own view of themselves, rather than that of the market. In most instances, if I took out the name of the company I am with, and put in the name of their least worthy competitor, the effect and accuracy of the statement changes little, if any. Which means that unworthy competitor can compete with you and deliver the same underwhelming experience at a lower cost.

This is even more pronounced when I ask: “Give me three specific value or positive business impacts you have delivered to your clients.” Instead of talking about how they were able to reduce delivery time by X, leading to a gain in revenue of Y, and reducing the cash sitting in inventory by Z, I hear a stream of beige, empty-calorie words.
value_propositions  sales  personal_branding  specificity  jargon  think_threes  salesmanship 
march 2016 by jerryking
My eBay MBA: a dozen business lessons from online auctions - FT.com
August 25, 2014 | FT | By Lucy Kellaway.
My eBay MBA: a dozen business lessons from online auctions.

1. Trust is vital . . .
2. Consumers are sometimes irrational
3 . . . and sometimes dead sensible
4. Jargon and hyperbole subtract value
5. Spelling matters
6. Accentuate warts
7. Arbitrage opportunities are plentiful
8. Do something you love
9. Study the data
10. The human touch is vital
11 Innovation is overrated
12. Tell stories
What they don’t teach you at eBay Business School . . .
. . . is how to network.
eBay  lessons_learned  Lucy_Kellaway  auctions  networking  overrated  trustworthiness  storytelling  irrationality  spelling  arbitrage  jargon  online_auctions 
august 2014 by jerryking
Lunch with the FT: Vikram Pandit - FT.com
July 11, 2014 | FT | By Tom Braithwaite.

“For a large group of people who grew up over the past two, three, four decades, they’ve been in a very different world – it was a world of predictable growth, it was a world of the ability to finance yourself, it was a world where you could really put one foot in front of the other. You find people grappling with what’s the new sustainable model for growth. And that is true of countries, it’s true of businesses.”
At the same time, Pandit proclaims that, largely thanks to technology, “It’s never been easier to start your own business.”
Our starters arrive. Beetroot and ricotta for Pandit while I get a plate decorated with delicious oily slivers of fish and vegetables offset by the occasional crunch from puffed rice and bite of horseradish.
“Bon appétit,” says Pandit, as he slices into a beetroot and continues to extol the virtues of something he calls the “SMAC stack”. I tell him this sounds awful but, he assures me, “it’s the vernacular for the ease for which you can get into business today,” and it stands for “Social media, Mobility, Applications and Cloud.
“Data is like . . . You’re too young, but there was a movie with the [line about] plastics.” When I assure him I’m familiar with The Graduate, he says: “Data is this generation’s plastics. I don’t see business models being truly successful until you get it.”...Pandit has a fondness for big concepts and management-speak and it can be difficult to bring him down to earth. I press him for examples. “You have large auto companies saying, ‘Where is the growth?’ and, on the other hand, you have a SMAC stack that’s created Uber. What’s interesting is that all those intangible abilities are inside the auto companies to make it happen.”
He has been investing in a steady stream of companies that he thinks embody innovative ideas that might make them the next Uber, the suddenly ubiquitous taxi-ordering app. At the same time, he is chairman of TGG Group, a consulting company set up by Steven Levitt, co-author of pop economics book Freakonomics – which aims to help corporations unlock their inner Ubers....Accordingly, while many of Pandit’s new investments are financial companies – Orchard, a platform for users to trade loans; CommonBond, a student lending platform; Fundbox, which lends money to small businesses against their invoices – only one, in India, has any aspirations to be a traditional bank.
With many of his new interests, Pandit says he is looking to remove “frictions”, which happen to be the way Citi and other banks make their money: for example, the middle men that sit between a big bond manager and retail investors and charge a fee. As he points out, the wealthiest individuals are not saddled with these costs to the same extent.
Vikram_Pandit  Citigroup  Wall_Street  career_paths  start_ups  financiers  financial_services  Sheila_Bair  fin-tech  Steven_Levitt  data  behavioural_economics  Second_Acts  reinvention  platforms  layer_mastery  data_driven  jargon  frictions  pain_points  large_companies  growth  Fortune_500  intangibles  SMAC_stack  automotive_industry 
july 2014 by jerryking
Ask, and you shall succeed |
Nov. 1, 2004 |PROFIT|Rick Spence. What are the breakthrough
questions that create clarity? Asking abstract, personal questions ("What's your org.'s reason for being? Why would you be missed if you were gone?") helps focus on a clients' real issues...VCs are probably the best at questioning.Their job is to wade through heady optimism, technical jargon, obscuring fluff & self-serving #'s to get to the truth. They ask a series of questions, starting with the predictable & straightforward and moving inexorably toward more oblique,
penetrating questions.Eg. "Who're your existing customers? Target customers? What constitutes an 'ideal' customer?" & "Who actually writes the cheque?" Tom Stoyan's breakthrough question when talking with a prospect (or a supplier, or anyone else), never overwhelm them with details they don't want. Before rushing into a spiel, ask prospects if they want the 30-sec. or the 3-min. version. Their response will help
you gauge their interest and calibrate your msg.

WHAT'S ONE OF THE MOST VALUABLE BUT UNDERUSED BUSINESS TOOLS? THE QUESTION! Before rushing into your spiel, ask prospects if they want the 30-second version or the 3-minute version. Their response will help you gauge their interest, and then tailor your message to fit. The right question can also save you time and effort when dealing with people who want things from you. Rebuff oral propositions. "Can you send me a proposal on paper?" Besides detectives and priests, VCs are probably the best at asking questions. "Who are your existing customers? Who are your target customers? What constitutes an 'ideal' customer?" And, finally, "Who actually writes the cheque?" Some questions diffuse complexity and create consensus. "What is your organization's reason for being? Whywould you be missed if you were gone?"
Rick_Spence  JCK  management_consulting  vapourware  decision_making  entrepreneur  skills  hiring  sales_presentations  questions  UpSark  venture_capital  VC  clarity  breakthroughs  calibration  jargon  follow-up_questions  overoptimism 
april 2011 by jerryking
10 Words That Should Never Appear on Your Website
Apr. 7, 2011 |BNET|Jeff Haden “Innovative.” If you truly are
innovative, show me. Describe products developed, processes
modified.“Service provider.” says nothing. Sell gas? State that. Design
commercial office spaces? State it. Use plain language & state what
you do.“Proven track record.”Give facts & figures.Share on-time
performance rates, or waste %, or under-budget statistics…let your track
record be proven by achievements.Don’t have any yet? No problem; you
don’t have a track record either, so it’s moot. “Unique blend
of…”Describe why you’re better. “World-class.” The fact that you
provide products/services to a global customer base doesn’t mean you a
world-class company. “Collaborative approach.” Instead describe the
process. Show exactly how we’ll work together. “Outstanding customer
experiences.”Providing an outstanding customer experience is important;
State what's expected that will make my experience so outstanding.
“Dynamic.”. “Myriad solutions.” “Results oriented.”
customer_experience  jargon  JCK  Jeff_Haden  plain_English  rules_of_the_game  websites 
april 2011 by jerryking

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