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7 Closing Strategies to Double Your Average Sale Size
August 11 | Entrepreneur Magazine | Marc Wayshak - GUEST WRITER
Your success depends on closing bigger, better deals. Put your time and energy into prospects with the power to make large investments and introduce you to others who can do the same.

1. Get over your fear.
Many salespeople are simply too scared to sell to huge companies...... large companies face the same problems as your small customers do, just on a bigger scale. This means they need a bigger version of your solution -- and they have the budget to match. Get over your fear.

2. Stand apart from the crowd.
High-level prospects hear from an average of 10 salespeople every day. If you do what everyone else is doing, you’ll never get through to them or earn their trust. To double your average sales size, you must be intentional about standing apart from the crowd in your industry. While others pitch, you should ask questions. While others are enthusiastic, you should be low-key and genuine. While your competitors focus on their products, you should focus on your prospect’s deepest frustrations and show how you can solve them.

3. Stop selling to low-level prospects.
Selling low-level prospects harms your close rate and decreasing your average sale size. Low-level prospects simply don’t have the power or budget to tell you “yes." They’re not the decision-makers. If you want to increase the size of your sales, stop selling to prospects who lack the budget to invest in your solution.

4. Sell to decision-makers.
It’s a best practice to head straight to the top of the food chain and sell to directors, vice presidents, and C-level executives. They have the power and budget to say “yes” to your offer. If someone refers you back down the chain, you’re still landing an introduction to the right person -- by his or her boss, no less.

5. Stop cold-calling.
Cold calls are miserable. Try implementing a sales-prospecting campaign. Plan your calls, letters and emails as follow-ups to a valuable letter or package you send via FedEx. This could be a special report, unique sample or company analysis. These intentional, repeated touches over a series of months will set you up as a familiar name by the time you actually get your prospect on the phone. When a huge sale is on the line, you can afford to invest time and money to catch a single prospect’s attention.

6. Know the decision-making process.
If you’ve closed only small deals at small companies in the past, you might be accustomed to working with just one or two decision-makers at a time. In large corporations, the decision-making process can be much more complicated. One of the biggest mistakes salespeople make is failing to understand the decision-making process. Get a grasp of this early on, and you can stay in front of the right people, build value for them and close your sales at higher prices.

7. Leverage sales for introductions.
When you close one large sale at a big organization, don’t stop there. Ask new customers for introductions to others in their company or network who could benefit from your offering. You have nothing to lose by asking for introductions, but failure to do so will cost you massive opportunity and revenue.
Gulliver_strategies  sales  fear  large_companies  differentiation  sales_cycle  buyer_choice_rejection  cold_calling  referrals  prospects  JCK  executive_management  campaigns  Aimia  LBMA  strategic_thinking  close_rate  questions  thinking_big  enterprise_clients  C-suite  low-key  authenticity  doubling  the_right_people 
august 2017 by jerryking
Boost your sales with tips from Warren Buffett
DECEMBER 18, 2012 | The Globe and Mail | by HARVEY SCHACHTER, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL.

How to Close a Deal Like Warren Buffett
By Tom Searcy and Henry DeVries
(McGraw-Hill, 217 pages, $24.95)

The authors recommend a process they call "the triples" that will help you make the case for your product or service:

Triple 1: The prospect's three problems

First, find out – and write down – the three biggest problems the prospect faces in the area your product or service can help. This aligns you with the buyer's interests.

Triple 2: Your three-part solution

Now think carefully about how you can solve each problem. As you write it out for the client, remember that generic language such as "improved," "better," and "big difference" are not that compelling. Use actual numbers and refer to specific pressure points to focus on the outcomes your prospect can expect.

Triple 3: Your three references

The third step is to identify at least three references you can share who have experienced similar outcomes when using your products and services. This may be sensitive, given confidentiality and competitive issues. But the authors stress: "The most effective way to get the attention of prospects is to drop the names of others just like them."

The authors urge you to become a student of psychology and develop profiles of members of the prospect's team. Try to determine each person's fears, since those qualms may send your pitch into the ditch. Determine each person's point of view about your solution, as well as any other personal trait or event that might be of importance. At the same time, study the team dynamics, from where people sit around the table to who they defer to.

The most dangerous person will be "the eel." The authors insist that "in every deal, and at every prospect's table, there is always an eel – a person who is against the deal. Always. Eels have a tendency to hang out in the shadows. They are hard to get to, and they usually talk you down when you're not around."

Usually eels are driven by fear that they don't want to acknowledge, so instead they insist they are against the deal on principle. They are dangerous, and must be identified early. Then you can try to co-opt them, taking the eel's ideas and baking them into your proposal.
aligned_interests  books  deal-making  eels  enterprise_clients  Harvey_Schachter  indispensable  JCK  management_consulting  obstacles  pitches  problems  problem_solving  psychology  references  salesmanship  solutions  tips  think_threes  Warren_Buffett 
august 2017 by jerryking
11 tips for freelance success
Thanks in part to globalisation and the state of the world economy, the number of
freelancers and freelance opportunities have grown rapidly in the past
decade.
For individuals, freelancing offers the possibility of an
entrepreneurial lifestyle and a level of self-determination that is hard
to find at a nine-to-five.

For businesses that may not have the luxury
of hiring a full-time employee or need expertise that is hard to find
and/or develop in-house, retaining a freelancer may be the most
attractive way to get a job done.

But freelancing isn't all roses. Most individuals who become freelancers
aren't billing themselves out at thousands of dollars a day, and many
fail to earn more than they used to earn (or could
earn) as full-time employees.

Some, sadly, are unable to find their way
and are forced out of freelance-dom.
For those wanting to 'make it', here are 11 life-saving tips.

Dot your i's and cross your t's
While few freelancers like dealing with legal issues and attorneys, having a formal agreement in place for each gig can help protect you against non-payment and avoidable legal headaches.

As such, savvy freelancers will seek out competent legal counsel early on, and at a minimum, invest in the drafting of a solid template agreement that can be applied to common projects.

Demand a deposit for every project
New freelancers in particular are often hesitant to require an up-front deposit from clients, believing that it will cost them business. But the truth is that no reasonable client will refuse to pay a reasonable deposit, making the deposit one of the best tools for filtering out the clients most likely to be deadbeats.

Once a long-term client relationship is established, it may be appropriate to consider alternate arrangements, but it's wise to treat those arrangements as you would a loan that doesn't require a down payment.

In other words, understand what you could lose if the loan is not repaid, and make sure that loss is tolerable.

Don't get distracted by the "hourly versus fixed price" debate
While it's not always the case, the general belief is that freelancers love hourly engagements and clients love fixed price engagements.

At the end of the day, however, the "hourly versus fixed price" debate is usually a red herring. If you're billing hourly for a project, your client is going to want an estimate of how many hours the project will take to complete.

And if you're billing a fixed amount for a project, you're going to base the amount on an hourly rate and the number of hours you believe the project will take to complete.
The key is making sure that you have enough information to establish the scope of the work required, and that you have enough skill to accurately estimate work time based on scope.

If scope isn't established and/or you're not capable of estimating accurately, the project is at risk regardless of whether you're billing by the hour or for the whole shebang.

Invoice well, invoice religiously
One of the most common reasons individuals fail at freelancing is that they don't generate the cash they need when they need it. In other words, they have clients and gigs, but it's a constant struggle to pay the bills.

Many freelancers find the lesson that strong revenue does not necessarily equate to strong cash flow to be a harsh one, but once learned, it's much easier to address the matter.

Building strong cash flow starts with invoicing. First, you need to set fair if not favorable invoicing terms (hint: net 45 or 60, or higher, can be painful).

Then, you actually need to submit your invoices in a timely fashion (eg. when they're able to be submitted or due), something that, surprisingly, many freelancers fail to do even though there are plenty of cost-effective tools that can make the process easy.

Minimize your ratio of new client acquisition to billable work
Freelancing can be very profitable -- when you're billing. But many freelancers spend a lot of time not billing, and for many of these freelancers, new client acquisition is the biggest source of non-billable time.

It shouldn't be. While you probably don't want to be dependent on one or two clients, if you're spending more than 25-30% of your time each month looking for new ones, you may eventually find it hard to be successful.

Find your optimal rate
One of the best ways to minimize the amount of new client acquisition you need to engage in is to find your optimal rate and pricing structure. Charge too little and you'll find it hard to thrive. Charge too much, however, and you'll find that your clients may send you a lot less work than they'd otherwise like to.
At the end of the day, finding your optimal rate is effectively the same thing as maximizing your revenue. A freelancer who bills 120 hours a month at $100/hour makes more money than a freelancer who bills 60 at $150/hour, and incidentally, is probably more likely to be staying sharp and working on interesting things.

Focus on what you do best and what you want to do, not on what you can do
Many freelancers make a huge mistake: they make their sole criteria for taking on a project the answer to the question, "Can I do this, and make money?" Instead, it pays to focus on what you do best and take on work that's aligned with your long-term positioning and goals.

Everything else can distract you from getting to where you want to go, even if it helps pay a few bills in the short-term.

Be realistic about scale
Service businesses have unique scaling challenges, and individual freelancers will obviously find it difficult to grow revenue beyond their hourly rate times the number of hours in a working day.

For ambitious, established freelancers, building a team or outsourcing may seem like a good way to grow revenue. But growing the number of hours you can bill in this fashion and maintaining quality can be very difficult to do.

Also consider that this type of expansion may force you to do more project management, so make sure your project management skills are sufficient and, more importantly, than you're willing to trade some of your 'real' work for project management.

Don't underestimate the importance of location
The stereotypical freelancer lifestyle can be attractive, but don't get too infatuated with the notion that you can live on the beach in some exotic, inexpensive land while billing out design or development work at London day rates.

The market for freelancers is competitive, and location can matter. If the majority of your clients are based in, say, New York, and you're based in Phuket, the distance between you and your clients could eventually become a major liability.

Don't be afraid to part ways with clients
Few things are as rewarding than long-term client relationships. But that doesn't mean that you should maintain a client relationship for the sake of maintaining the relationship.

If a once-solid client becomes a headache (eg. they're not paying you on time or are treating you disrespectfully), you shouldn't feel obligated to keep providing your services. And sometimes, your areas of focus may diverge from a client's needs.

In these cases, doing what's right for you (moving on), as difficult as it may be, is probably also what needs to be done if you're going to do right by your client.

Become a business owner
Most freelancers start off thinking of themselves as a 'freelancers', but at some point, a successful freelancer should recognize that she's really a business owner.

That means learning about, and taking responsibility for, business activities like bookkeeping, accounting and marketing. Doing this can often mean the difference between success and failure, as there are many talented freelancers who fail to succeed because they're poor business owners.

As an example, consider the importance of building a cash position. A good business owner will try to build a solid cash position, as this can provide a safety net for a rainy day, expansion capital, or the ability to offer more flexible payment terms to clients.

A freelancer who is not a good business owner, on the other hand, is less likely to think of her freelancing operation as a business for which a strong cash position is desirable or necessary.
aligned_interests  charge_for_something  emergency_funds  freelancing  gig_economy  hard_to_find  jck  owners  safety_nets  screening  via:Memeserver 
december 2016 by jerryking
Struggling to find work? Try creating your own infomercial - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Oct. 30, 2016

Jim Beqaj,'s book, True Fit. an executive coach and former president of CIBC Wood Gundy, who learned from being the wrong fit in two top executive posts that we need to be less automatic or desperate in taking on jobs and far more discriminating.

Answer four questions, which will form the heart of your infomercial:

(1) What should you pay me for? List the strengths you bring to the job. Not the normal bumph on a résumé--a clear listing of skills.

(2) Who do you work best with? Look through your life and list the people you liked working with – and why. They may have been big-picture thinkers, energetic, boisterous, decisive, or collaborative.

(3) How do I like to resolve conflict? Workplaces can have strikingly different methods for handling conflict and you don’t want to find yourself in the wrong camp.

“Your conflict-resolution style could be, for example, competitive. If you’re in an environment where avoidance and accommodation is the order of the day, you could be seen as a bully, not a team player.

(4) What’s my perfect day? Describe a day or a specific project you worked on in which you were so absorbed in what you were doing it didn’t feel like work.
books  conflict_resolution  fit  Harvey_Schachter  inbound_marketing  infomercials  JCK  job_search  management_consulting  Managing_Your_Career  personal_branding  self-worth  strengths 
november 2016 by jerryking
The Choices That Led Small Business Owners to Wealth - The New York Times
FEB. 12, 2016 | NYT | By PAUL SULLIVAN

have to make decisions to professionalize the business, put systems in place and have a plan that allows them to do longer-term planning. Those decisions can make the difference between being a small-business owner and a business executive with significant wealth....“There is no bright-line test when a company gets to a certain size or age to do these things,” said Kevin M. Harris, head of the family business group at Northern Trust. “It is based on where the company wants to go.”

Determining which decisions were the ones that made the difference is sometimes not an easy task, and the stories that are retold are often the ones that turned out well. Yet it is worth considering what can go wrong.

Entrepreneurs who failed to find success were often resistant to change
small_business  wealth_creation  decision_making  entrepreneur  risk-taking  mindsets  JCK  thinking_tragically  Northern_Trust  owners  private_banking  choices  internal_systems  professionalization  high_net_worth 
february 2016 by jerryking
Control Your Passions
"A man who governs his passions is master of the world. We must either command them or be enslaved by them. It is better to be a hammer than an anvil."

--St. Dominic Guzman
self-discipline  passions  quotes  jck 
november 2015 by jerryking
Why Startups Need to Blog (and what to talk about …)
Editor’s Note: This is a guest post by Mark Suster (@msuster), a 2x entrepreneur, now VC at GRP Partners. Read more about Suster at Bothsidesofthetable

Blogs. We all read them to get a sense of what is going on in the world, peeling back layers of the old world in which media was too scripted.

By definition, if you are reading this you read blogs. But should you actually write one if you’re a startup, an industry figure (lawyer, banker) or VC? Absolutely.

This is a post to help you figure out why you should write and what you should talk about.

1. Why
If you care about accessing customers, reaching an audience, communicating your vision, influencing people in your industry, marketing your services or just plain engaging in a dialog with others in your industry a blog is a great way to achieve this.

People often ask me why I started blogging. It really started simply enough. I was meeting regularly with entrepreneurs and offering (for better or for worse) advice on how to run a startup and how to raise venture capital from my experience in doing so at two companies. I was having the same conversations over-and-over again (JFDI, Don’t Roll Out the Red Carpet when Employees are on the Way Out the Door, Don’t Drink Your Own Kool Aid, etc) and I figured I might as well just write them up and make them available for future people who might be interested. I never really expected a big audience or ever thought about it.

I had been reading Brad Feld’s blog & Fred Wilson’s blog for a couple of years and found them very helpful to my thinking so I honestly just thought I was giving back to the community.

The results have been both unexpected and astounding. Within 2 years I was getting 400,000 views / month and had been voted the 2nd most respected VC in the country by an independent survey of entrepreneurs, The Funded and sentiment analysis. I know that I have not yet earned these kudos based on investment returns (although my partners have. GRP Partners last fund is the single best performing VC fund in the US (prequin data) for its vintage year). But it speaks volumes to what people want from our industry:

transparency
accessibility
authenticity
thought leadership
advice

I’ll bet your customers, business partners or suppliers would love similar.
2. What



I often get the question from people, “I’d like to blog, but I don’t really know what to talk about?” Or “I’m a new entrepreneur, why would I offer advice on how to run a startup?”
You wouldn’t. You shouldn’t.

Not only would it be less authentic but if you’re a startup it’s not immediately clear that other startup CEOs are your target market. They’re mine because I’m a VC. I care about having a steady stream of talented startup people who want to raise money thinking that they should talk to me in addition to the top others whom they’re targeting.

Whom do you want to target? Who are your customers, partners or suppliers?

My suggestion is to blog about your industry. Think Mint.com. In their early days they had an enormously effective blog on the topic of personal financial management. They created a reason for their customers to aggregate on their site on a regular basis. They became both a thought leader in the space as well as a beautifully designed product. They created inbound link juice on topics that drove more traffic to their site. Type “personal financial management” into Google.  Mint.com is the second result. Smart.

Think Magento. They are an open-source & SaaS provider of eCommerce solutions. They are the fastest growing player in the world in this space. They achieved all of this before they raised even a penny of venture capital. eCommerce is an enormously competitive search term. Yet type it into Google and the third result (behind the Wikipedia entry and ecommerce.com) is Magento. Magic. They did it by creating a blog, discussion board and hub for eCommerce advice and information.

So you developed a product for the mommy community? Blog on that topic. Do you have an application that helps mobile developers build HTML5 apps? You know your blog topic. Do you have sales productivity software? Obvious. Check out SalesCrunch posts. Blog to your community. Be a thought leader. Don’t blog to your friend (that might be a separate Tumblog or something) but blog to your community.

If you’re going to pump out regular content that is meaningful, you obviously need to blog about a topic in which you’re knowledgeable, thoughtful and passionate. If you’re not all three of these things in your industry then I guess you’ve got a broader problem. Honestly.

So my biggest recommendation of “what” to blog is a series of articles that will be helpful to your community. If you’re a lawyer, blog on a topic that would be helpful to potential customers. Show that you’re a thought leader. Scott Edward Walker does an excellent job at this. It’s the only reason I know who he is. I had seen his blog & his Tweets and then was interested to meet him IRL.
Do a brainstorming session and create a list of 40-50 topics that interest you. Write out the topic and maybe even the blog title. Keep the list electronically. .

Struggling to come up with enough topics? Take one topic and break it up into 10 bite-sized articles. It’s probably better that way anyways. I wanted to write about the top 10 attributes of an entrepreneur. I wrote it all in one sitting and then broke it up into 10 separate posts. It kept me busy for 3 weeks! Each one ended up taking on a life of its own as the comments flowed in for post 1 I had more thoughts to add to post 2 and so on.


3. Where

You need a blog. Duh. If you’re a company and if hanging it off of your company website makes sense for the link traffic – go for it. If you’re head of marketing at a company and keeping a more generalized blog (in addition to your company blog) so that you can influence brands & agencies – it can be separate.

I chose for my blog to be independent of my firm, GRP Partners.  The reason is that I wanted to be free to say what I was thinking independently of my partners. My views don’t always represent theirs and vice-versa even though we’re pretty like-minded (we’ve worked together for 10+ years).  I chose a title that represented a brand that I wanted to emphasize – Both Sides of the Table. I chose it because I thought it would represent who I am – mostly an entrepreneur but somebody with investment chops. I wanted to differentiate.

So. People keep asking me, “why would you write on TechCrunch?” I guess I would have thought it was obvious. Apparently not. People say, “aren’t you driving traffic away from your own blog?”

Facts:

I don’t really care about total page views or uniques other than as a measure of whether I’m improving. I don’t sell ads.
I DO care about “share of mind,” which means that I want fish in the pond where the people whom I want to speak with hang out. I know a certain number hit my blog. But I’m not so arrogant (or successful) as to think they come all the time. So I take my show on the road. If I can write about a topic for which I’m passionate about and double or triple the number of people who read it – that’s gold dust. That’s why I never stopped anybody from taking my feed and republishing.
As it happens, since I began writing at TechCrunch my viewership has continued to go up, not down. I always publish on my own blog the day after it runs on TC. I want the historical post there. A large number of readers on my site get it from Feedburner or newsletter feed.
I also get a lot of inbound links from writing here. I try to make any inbound links to my blog authentic to the story. But each story has driven 1,000′s of views.
The majority of my traffic still comes from Twitter. TC posts = more Twitter followers = more conversion when I do write on my own blog = more Feedburner / newsletter subs = more traffic. It’s an ecosystem. Simple.

So once you have a blog, a voice and a small following – don’t be shy about writing some guest posts for target blogs. Remember – for you that’s likely not TC – it’s the place your community hangs out.

4. How

Be authentic. Don’t try to sound too smart or too funny.  Just be yourself.  People will see who you are in your words.  If you try to make everything too perfect you’ll never hit publish.  If you try to sound too intelligent you’ll likely be boring as shit.  Most blogs are.  I hate reading blow hards who try to sound like they’re smarter than the rest of us. Be open and transparent.  Get inside your reader’s minds.  Try to think about what they would want to know from you.  In fact, ask them!

Don’t be offensive – it’s never worth it to offend great masses of people.  But that doesn’t mean sitting on the fence.  I have a point of view and I’m sure sometimes it rankles.  But I try to be respectful about it.  Sitting on the fence on all issues is also pretty boring.  And don’t blog drunk.  Or at least don’t hit publish ;-) Mostly, have fun.  If you can’t do that you won’t last very long.

How do I get started? First, you’ll need a platform.  I use WordPress.  Some people swear by SquareSpace. There are the new tools like Tumblr and Posterous.  I’ve played with both and they’re pretty cool. They’re more light weight and easier to use. Importantly, they’re more social. It’s much easier to build an audience in social blogging platforms the way you do in Twitter or Facebook.  T

hen  you need to decide whether to use the “hosted” version or the “installed” version.  At least that’s true in WordPress.  The advantage of the hosted version is that it’s easier to get started.  The disadvantage is that you can’t install a lot of additional tools that use Javascript. I started with the hosted version and then migrated to an installed version so I could use Google Analytics and some other products.

You then need a URL.  It’s … [more]
featured  TC  Mark_Suster  start_ups  blogs  via:trevinwagner  content  advice  JCK  personal_branding  thought_leadership  WordPress  SquareSpace  Tumblr  Posterous 
july 2015 by jerryking
A billionaire’s guide to productivity - The Globe and Mail
FRED MOUAWAD
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Feb. 11 2015

1. Prioritize. Rank the level of importance of family, me time, and work. Think about the areas of life that need nurturing in order to feel more fulfilled. It is essential to strike a balance to lead both a happy and productive life.

2. Allocate time (JCK: lead time) to maximize an impact (JCK: leverage or return on effort). Forewarned is forearmed. Plan ahead how you will use your time – after all, knowing your schedule is half the battle.

3. Know your natural penchants. If you find that the time spent on these activities does not give you a high level of return, consider allocating your time more thoughtfully.

4. Reduce uncertainty, increase accountability. A lack of clarity is productivity’s greatest enemy.

5. Know when to be a lone wolf. It is important to know your strengths. What tasks are you better off performing on your own? What tasks can you delegate?

6. Establish a nurturing culture. Productivity is easier to achieve in the right environment.

7. Measurement gets results-- measure performance to make continuous improvements. But make sure that you measuring the right things.
time-management  productivity  GTD  JCK  lead_time  priorities  strengths  self-discipline  business_planning  reflections  work_life_balance  uncertainty  clarity  affirmations  self-awareness  ksfs  preparation  penchants  predilections  measurements  proclivities  willpower  high-impact  time-allocation  return_on_effort 
february 2015 by jerryking
6 Things I'd Do If I Got Laid-off By IBM
Jan 26, 2015 | LinkedIn | J.T. O'Donnell

4) Become 100% clear on your specialty. Employers hire the aspirin to their pain. While you might be a diversely skilled, jack-of-all-trades, you can't market yourself that way. Saying you can do everything sounds unfocused and desperate. You need to know what your special problem-solving, pain-relieving expertise is (i.e. your special sauce). Then, you need to market it accordingly.

5) Optimize your sales tools for your business-of-one. Your resume and LinkedIn profile must be set up to showcase your specialty quickly - and with as much impact as possible. Keyword optimization is vital. Knowing what recruiters are looking for when it comes to your skill set and showcasing it in the proper format will dramatically increase the amount of activity you get on your candidacy. [Here's an article to help you understand how little time your resume has to get a recruiter's attention.]

6) Create an interview bucket list. The fastest way to find job opportunities is to build a bucket list of companies you want to work for and network your way into the process. The majority of jobs gotten today are done so via referral. Creating a target list of employers and working a strategy to build relationships with them is the smartest way to land a job with a company you admire and respect. Especially, when you may be competing against lots of other ex-IBM employees for positions. [Here's a step-by-step plan on how to create your own bucket list of employers.]
IBM  layoffs  tips  LinkedIn  bouncing_back  Managing_Your_Career  job_search  painkillers  pain_points  JCK  specialists  special_sauce  résumés  personal_branding  referrals  unfocused 
january 2015 by jerryking
Recruiting has changed – and so should you - The Globe and Mail
LEAH EICHLER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 23 2015

how then, should job seekers manage their social media presence?

The two recommend a tasteful profile that clearly communicates a candidate’s history. A judiciously worded profile, they say, is more likely to get a stamp of approval from recruiters than one than one that goes overboard in listing professional feats and accomplishments.

Once a recruiter can check off the required skills and experience for a job description, that’s when questions of personality and relationship with the hiring organization come into play. It is this crucial attention to the soft skills that differentiates some executive search firms from those merely engaged in their own online search.
Leah_Eichler  recruiting  LinkedIn  executive_search  personal_branding  JCK  Managing_Your_Career 
january 2015 by jerryking
Eight ways to become the most proactive person you know - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL MOGILL
Young Entrepreneur Council
Published Tuesday, Dec. 09 2014

It’s all about you. No one else is going to get you where you want to go – it’s up to you.... Take ownership of your problems, and realize that nobody else is going to solve them for you.

Be solution-focused. ...The most effective way to handle a problem is to focus on finding a solution. Focusing on things that are out of your control is a waste of time, so focus on what you can control with the final outcome.

Be accountable. Set your clearly defined, quantifiable goal and then work backwards from that goal to establish metrics to track and evaluate it.

Use “SMART” goals. S: Specific (Pick something particular instead of using a broad category.) M: Measurable (Choose something you can quantify.) A: Attainable (You should actually be able to reach this, and it may just require the right steps.) R: Realistic (Be honest – it’s probably unrealistic to say you will go from making $10,000 to being a billionaire in one year.)T: Timely (Give each goal a timeframe to create a sense of urgency.)

Make your own luck. Being successful ... is about taking steps every day to be better than you were the day before by moving in a positive, forward trajectory. Make a blueprint and set out milestones for yourself in specific timeframes, or you are not going to hit your goal. Things do not come to fruition just because you really, really want them to happen. You have to make them happen.

Be consistent. Ultimately, success is not about getting everything right. It is about being consistent. Are you consistently and persistently taking steps every day to steadily move toward your goal?

Find the right people. Surrounding yourself with driven, effective people is a proven way to help you succeed.

Honesty is the best policy. Busywork is not effectiveness/progress. At the end of the day, if you don’t hit your goals, you are only doing a disservice to yourself. You cannot get better if you tell yourself, “Oh, it’s okay, I’m fine where I am.” (There has to be a certain element of sustained dissatisfaction).
accountability  affirmations  beyond_one's_control  blueprints  books  busywork  chance  character_traits  consistency  contingency  dissatisfaction  effectiveness  goal-setting  GTD  honesty  indispensable  intrinsically_motivated  It's_up_to_me  JCK  ksfs  luck  Managing_Your_Career  personal_control  proactivity  problem_solving  productivity  rainmaking  restlessness  self-starters  solutions  solution-finders  span_of_control  the_right_people  thinking_backwards  work-back_schedules 
december 2014 by jerryking
How can I make $XX,000/month for next 6 months?
A) Goal
B) The Plan
1. Find something you are good at doing,
2. Find a group of people who are having a problem
3. You create a a product that solves a problem that they are having.
4. Create a Sales Letter
5. Test The Marketing
C) The Timeline
D) The Payment Processing
Quora  howto  problems  validation  wealth_creation  JCK  problem_solving 
october 2014 by jerryking
Re: Early morning epiphanies
Owen Gordon Today at 8:30 AM
To:Jerry King
First of all, thanks for the pick-me-upper by sharing that particular vocational anecdote from the Agenda first thing in the a.m.:-)

I know that you'r...
Owen_Gordon  JCK  advice  career  Managing_Your_Career  Communicating_&_Connecting  anecdotal 
september 2014 by jerryking
Want to land a big client? Here are four important tips - The Globe and Mail
MATTHIJS KEIJ
Young Entrepreneur Council
Published Tuesday, Aug. 12 2014

Study them

Landing a big client isn’t about you. Let me say that again: It is not about you.... remember that to succeed, you must help your client succeed. How do you do that? Study everything you can about the client until you fully understand the business, strategies and objectives.

Next, clearly define how your product or service will help the company achieve its goals. If you can identify a problem or isolate areas for improvement, then you can clearly illustrate your ability to provide a unique solution.

Make the connection. to land that enterprise client, try to identify your Norgay or Hillary. Talking to the wrong people wastes valuable time. However, if you can create a relationship with a strategic partner, that person can help get you in front of the right people and into the necessary meetings – all the more quickly than you could do on your own. Your target client is Mount Everest. Start climbing.
Gain influence

“An enterprise client needs to be convinced that working with your company is the best decision they could ever make,” says Karthik Manimozh, president and COO of 1-Page. “One of the most effective ways to help them arrive at this conclusion is to let your reputation precede you.”

The leadership, prestige and visibility that your company wields in the marketplace are all key factors that influence buying decisions. The answers your potential enterprise client seeks rest on your ability to shape your story. Good PR and marketing is the foundation. Strategic networking and social proof are pillars.

Remember, influence is something that comes with hard work...Be everywhere; talk with everyone (but ensure your conversations are informative and upbeat, never desperate).

Persevere through tough times

It can take months or even more than a year to land an enterprise client. Nothing worth having comes easy.

During that time, you’re bound to find yourself in countless meetings, possibly caught up in the middle of office politics, or jumping through hoops as the legal and procurement departments vet your company. Don’t dismay. This is par for the course when trying to land an enterprise client.
solutions  solution-finders  marketing  business_development  tips  indispensable  influence  networking  JCK  due_diligence  large_companies  perseverance  Communicating_&_Connecting  value_propositions  serving_others  strategic_thinking  client_development  hard_work  enterprise_clients  hard_times  office_politics  Michael_McDerment  the_right_people 
august 2014 by jerryking
5 Things Super Lucky People Do
Mar 17, 2014 | Inc. Magazine | BY Kevin Daum.

1. Play to your strengths. So much time and energy is wasted trying to do things you probably don't do very well. Author and Inc. columnist Lewis Schiff learned from his survey of incredibly wealthy people that they got that way by focusing only on what they do best. Everything else you can delegate, or you could find a partner to compensate for your weaknesses. That way, you will shine where you excel and attract opportunity. Good things come to those who emanate success.

2. Prepare in advance. Unlucky people often get that way because they're reactive and unprepared for whatever comes. People who have stored food and water in their basements aren't lucky to find themselves prepared when disaster strikes, they used forethought to make sure they had what they might need just in case. I personally scoff at this horrible recent trend of disparaging business plans because things change constantly. The point of a business plan isn't to follow it no matter what, it's to establish a structure for smart decision making that allows you to succeed no matter what the future might bring.

3. Start early. Some people seem to have more hours in the day. I myself don't need more than six hours of sleep and am constantly finding ways to be more efficient. I use that extra time to start my projects well in advance. My rewards aren't dependent upon the time of day that I take action. (This column is being written at 3 a.m.) But it does matter that I'm beginning to explore projects I expect to complete months or years from now. So many people only want to put their energy into things that provide immediate gratification. The most fortunate people I know are the ones who planted seeds early and now reap that harvest of happiness.

4. Connect with as many people as possible. The key to success is access to opportunity. Access comes from influence. If you're influential, people will come and bring opportunities to you. The bigger your following, the more powerful your influence. The only way to build a big following is to provide value to many people. You have to provide the sort of value that will cause people to spread your thoughts far and wide, attributing credit to you when they do. Are you creating that kind of value? If not, figure how you can.

5. Follow up. Opportunities often come and go because people don't respond in a timely manner. I'm always amazed when people ask me for something and I respond only to never hear from them again. Three months ago, a young woman asked me if I hire interns or assistants. I replied immediately saying I'm always willing to consider hiring people who bring value to my work. I asked her how she thought she could enhance what I could do. I never heard from her again. Perhaps she now considers herself unlucky that opportunity doesn't come her way. I believe that following up is often more powerful and impressive than the act of initiating.
tips  luck  Communicating_&_Connecting  opportunities  JCK  focus  preparation  readiness  value_creation  networking  following_up  self-starters  overachievers  strengths  affirmations  forethought  weaknesses  individual_initiative  unprepared  chance  contingency  partnerships  high-achieving  early_risers 
march 2014 by jerryking
“How can I meet angel investors?”
This is a great question because many angel investors value their privacy and deliberately maintain low profiles to avoid being hit on every day. So here are 5.5 things to consider when thinking ab...
howto  angels  JCK 
february 2014 by jerryking
Hard Things You Need To Do To Be Successful - Business Insider
Jan. 14, 2014

You have to make the call you're afraid to make.
You have to get up earlier than you want to get up.
You have to give more than you get in return right away.
You have to care more about others than they care about you.
You have to fight when you are already injured, bloody, and sore.
You have to feel unsure and insecure when playing it safe seems smarter.
You have to lead when no one else is following you yet.
You have to invest in yourself even though no one else is.
You have to look like a fool while you're looking for answers you don't have.
You have to grind out the details when it's easier to shrug them off.
You have to deliver results when making excuses is an option.
You have to search for your own explanations even when you're told to accept the "facts."
You have to make mistakes and look like an idiot.
You have to try and fail and try again.
You have to run faster even though you're out of breath.
You have to be kind to people who have been cruel to you.
You have to meet deadlines that are unreasonable and deliver results that are unparalleled.
You have to be accountable for your actions even when things go wrong.
You have to keep moving towards where you want to be no matter what's in front of you.
You have to do the hard things. The things that no one else is doing. The things that scare you. The things that make you wonder how much longer you can hold on.

Those are the things that define you. Those are the things that make the difference between living a life of mediocrity or outrageous success.

The hard things are the easiest things to avoid. To excuse away. To pretend like they don't apply to you.

The simple truth about how ordinary people accomplish outrageous feats of success is that they do the hard things that smarter, wealthier, more qualified people don't have the courage — or desperation — to do.

Do the hard things. You might be surprised at how amazing you really are.
affirmations  hard_work  hard_truths  howto  indispensable  invest_in_yourself  It's_up_to_me  JCK  ksfs  next_play  playing_it_safe  self-discipline 
january 2014 by jerryking
Why you need to build your legacy now
Dec. 24 2013 | The Globe and Mail | JESSICA LEIGH JOHNSTON

“Are you on this planet to do something, or are you here for something to do?" --after some thinking, they understand that the answer is to do something. Then we say, “If you’re here to do something, what is it?”
the legacy you leave is the life you lead: it’s what you are doing right now that determines how you will be remembered. Thinking of ‘life’ as an acronym is a helpful guideline for thinking about legacy:

· What are the Lessons that you want people to say you taught them?

· What are the Ideals you hope people will say that you stood for?

· What are the Feelings you hope people will say they had when you were around them?

· What are the tangible Expressions of your leadership? Not just your accomplishments, but the things you might have contributed. Maybe you worked every Saturday for 25 years for Habitat for Humanity, or you were active in the community as a volunteer for sports. What are some of those tangible achievements?

We find this framework useful for people to reflect on legacy, and to come back to it periodically and ask themselves, “Is there anything more I want to add, and am I living my life in harmony with these guidelines?”

"What is the best way to learn something?” And I thought I had the learned the answer to that question, and said confidently: “The best way to learn something is to experience it yourself.” Fred turned to me and he said, “No, Jim, the best way to learn something is to teach it to someone else.”
legacies  leadership  JCK  life_skills  teaching  serving_others  values  affirmations  mybestlife 
december 2013 by jerryking
Ten ways to position yourself as a thought leader - The Globe and Mail
Jeff Quipp (for Charles Waud & WaudWare)

Contributed to The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Dec. 13 2013

key tips for professionals and business owners looking to carve out their place as thought leaders:

1. Blog. Wordpress is a popular platform and easy to use. Set up your blog and your editorial calendar (what you’ll blog about/when) at the same time with a commitment to blogging once a week.

2. Create e-books and white papers. This content showcases in-depth knowledge and entices website visitors to subscribe in order to access the information. By offering a valuable piece of content in exchange for their contact information you can continue to share insights and solicit feedback that informs your future content creation. These items are subsequently shared through various social networks thereby growing your profile as an authority. To begin this process, identify the areas for which you have the expertise to create a “how-to” guide. Offer information that is enduring while incorporating timely examples. Once created, the link and a call to action to download the e-book should be placed on every relevant page of your website. Using the contact information that was submitted in order to download the e-book, you can then carry on a dialogue with a captive audience and continue to define yourself as an authority in that space/on that topic.

3. PR and media coverage. Earned media is the signal that what you are doing or saying is newsworthy. Obtaining coverage of new initiatives, launches, and products adds profile and builds your caché in the public eye. Earned media is much more trusted than owned or paid media. It’s worth the investment to outsource this to an expert. You can be a thought leader and still outsource part of the effort to communicate that fact.

4. Speak at conferences (expertise). Every time you put yourself in the role of presenter or panel speaker for conferences you are building your authority as the go-to for those looking to glean new learning and best practices. Especially when the conference speaks to your industry, it takes confidence in your own knowledge and expertise to take on that role. If you establish yourself as being assured of your authority, others will confirm it through word of mouth and insider discussions about those speaker events. Look for opportunities by researching conferences by geography, topic, industry or associations with which you want to connect. When speaking, err on the side of giving people more -- not less -- so they walk away impressed, give good reviews, and buoy your reputation as a desired speaker.

5. Make yourself available through Q & A sites. Whether it’s an online industry forum or LinkedIn, professional chats are an ever-increasing avenue to get your thoughts and opinions seen.

6. Twitter chats. Every day, thousands of Twitter chats take place bringing people from all across the globe together, online, in real time, to discuss topics of interest.

7. Publish news early. Sharing news is vital on social media channels to carve out your space as an authority; it shows you’re on top of what’s happening. But being among the first to do so is key. Anyone can retweet the headline from today’s paper. Share it early and go the extra mile to find and share emerging news from less prevalent sources – keep in mind time differences and get your news from sources that may be ahead.

8. Expert commentary (expertise) on breaking news in your field. The latest launch, merger, acquisition. There are always changes and those are just the facts. What about the impact and the future it bears? Offer your expert commentary to key media as the news happens. Offer thoughtful input and practical tips to address changes or exploit opportunities; this is where your trusted PR experts come in handy. Additionally use these opportunities to fuel a blog and leverage those posts on your website and social media channels where they often get additional pick up. Remember, ***don’t just share the news – add value – say what it means to your current/prospective clients.***

9. Connect with other thought leaders. Comment on blogs or in LinkedIn groups within your industry. It will help get your name out there on topics that current and prospective stakeholders are interested in talking about and your comments will also be found in Google searches of your name. If other thought leaders are talking to you and about you that translates to a level of success by association.

10. Be a mentor. Offer your support to those coming up in the field. Whether it’s in the form of informational interviews, reviewing a proposal and providing feedback, speaking at postsecondary institutions or sitting on program advisory committees. By growing your presence as a source of influence and inspiration others will seek out your advice, input and professional service and spread the word about your authority.
thought_leadership  personal_branding  Managing_Your_Career  JCK  mentoring  content_creators  creating_valuable_content  public_speaking  expertise 
december 2013 by jerryking
The Path to Happy Employment, Contact by Contact on LinkedIn - NYTimes.com
By ERIC A. TAUB
Published: December 4, 2013

LinkedIn, the networking site for professionals, has become a vast business gathering place. With more than 259 million members in over 200 countries, LinkedIn offers users, most of whom pay nothing for the service, a chance to hone and increase their contacts. Users can also limit their connections to others who can best help them professionally....First, the basics: LinkedIn allows users to create a compelling text-and-multimedia narrative of their life and work. It can be updated at will, can be any length and it will often pop up in a Web search of the user’s name. Add multimedia, such as slide presentations and links to examples of your work.

Use the headline space (right under your name) to create a compelling statement about yourself. Instead of “third assistant stock clerk,” be creative. “Inventory manager with over 20 years’ experience” will generate more views. ....As Ted Prodromou, a San Francisco consultant and author of a book on how to use LinkedIn, says, “What would you type in, to find you?.....To avoid embarrassing congratulatory emails for something you haven’t done, turn off those notification settings before you post your profile .... To avoid embarrassing congratulatory emails for something you haven’t done, turn off those notification settings before you post your profile. To do so, hover your cursor over your picture in the upper right. Then click “Review,” next to “Privacy and Settings.”

On the “Profile” tab, you can turn off these “activity broadcasts” or decide who should see them if you want to leave them on. This is also where you can choose to let others know you have viewed their profile (or prefer to be anonymous), determine how much of your profile strangers can see, automatically send profile updates to your Twitter account and other options.
LinkedIn  productivity  howto  JCK  job_opportunities  job_search 
december 2013 by jerryking
Summary of my D. Sumptom feedback
Summary of my David Sumptom feedback:

q In order for others to promote you, you need to turn your language around to describe who you can help, the type of problems you can solve and how someone m...
feedback  personal_branding  websites  JCK  Managing_Your_Career  templates  advice  Ivey  alumni 
december 2013 by jerryking
Noel's Pitch Letter
steal elements of his note for your own purposes. Look at the way he helps you to recognize a 'Noel-solvable' problem. Look at the succinct way he conveys the unique 'Noel-selling-proposition'. He ma...
Noel_Desautels  Managing_Your_Career  networking  JCK  pitches  feedback  templates  value_propositions 
december 2013 by jerryking
How to Write a Coverletter--How it differs from a Resumé
Brian, I am fine with OK-ing the use of my name here. We have different writing styles, which is to be expected. However, it seems that we have radically different thoughts on the role of a cover l...
JCK  coverletters  first90days  résumés  Managing_Your_Career  feedback  templates 
december 2013 by jerryking
Jerry's Advice to New Grads
Take a long term perspective: the overarching goal should be to generate as many career options for yourself in May 2016 as possible.
Becoming an attractive candidate to start-ups/entrepreneu...
JCK  advice  new_graduates  feedback  generating_strategic_options 
november 2013 by jerryking
Interview with Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg; Interview with Michael Hayden; Interview with Michael Bloomberg
Aired November 3, 2013 - 10:00| FAREED ZAKARIA GPS | Interviews with Michael Hayden

=======================================
Let's get started.

So given those realities I just talked abou...
Fareed_Zakaria  Michael_Hayden  security_&_intelligence  spymasters  strategic_thinking  spycraft  JCK  Germany  leaders  trans-Atlantic 
november 2013 by jerryking
How to develop the mind of a strategist Part 1 of 3 - Google Drive
Apr/May 2001|Communication World. Vol. 18,Iss.3; pg. 13, 3 pgs.| by James E Lukaszewski.

Management wants and needs:

Valuable, useful, applicable advice beyond what the boss already knows

Well-timed, truly significant insights (insight is the ability to
distill wisdom and useful conclusions from contrasting, even seemingly
unrelated, information and facts)

Advance warning, plus options for solving, or at least managing, trouble
or opportunity, and the unintended consequences both often bring

Someone who understands the pattern of events and problems

Supporting evidence through the behavior of their peers

To be strategic, ideas must pass four tough tests: They must help the
boss achieve his/her objectives and goals. They must help the
organization achieve its goals. They must be truly necessary (and pass
the straight face and laugh tests). Without acting on the strategy recommended, some aspect of the business will fail or fail to progress.
strategic_thinking  strategy  public_relations  Communicating_&_Connecting  generating_strategic_options  indispensable  JCK  howto  endgame  wisdom  insights  warning_signs  ambiguities  advice  job_opportunities  job_search  actionable_information  pattern_recognition 
september 2013 by jerryking
The Financial Bonanza of Big Data
March 7, 2013 | WSJ | By KENNETH CUKIER AND VIKTOR MAYER-SCHÖNBERGER:
Vast troves of information are manipulated and monetized, yet companies have a hard time assigning value to it...The value of information captured today is increasingly in the myriad secondary uses to which it is put—not just the primary purpose for which it was collected.[True, but this secondary or exhaust data has to be placed in the right context in order to maximize value]. In the past, shopkeepers kept a record of all transactions so that they could tally the sums at the end of the day. The sales data were used to understand sales. Only more recently have retailers parsed those records to look for business trends...With big data, information is more potent, and it can be applied to areas unconnected with what it initially represented. Health officials could use Google's history of search queries—for things like cough syrup or sneezes—to track the spread of the seasonal flu in the United States. The Bank of England has used Google searches as a leading indicator for housing prices in the United Kingdom. Other central banks have studied search queries as a gauge for changes in unemployment.

Companies world-wide are starting to understand that no matter what industry they are in, data is among their most precious assets. Harnessed cleverly, the data can unleash new forms of economic value.
massive_data_sets  Amazon  books  Google  branding  Facebook  Wal-Mart  Bank_of_England  data  data_driven  value_creation  JCK  exhaust_data  commercialization  monetization  valuations  windfalls  alternative_data  economic_data  tacit_data  interpretation  contextual  sense-making  tacit_knowledge 
march 2013 by jerryking
A six-point checklist for hiring consultants
Jan. 02 2013 | The Globe and Mail | HARVEY SCHACHTER,
Special to The Globe and Mail

David Fields, a consultant on hiring consultants, offers in his new book, The Executive’s Guide to Consultants: key points-
1. Why are we considering an outside expert?
2. What are our desired outcomes?

3. When will we know we’re on the right track?

4. What risks do we face?

5. What is the value of taking on this project?

6. Which parameters will limit or affect the project?
Harvey_Schachter  management_consulting  risks  checklists  book_reviews  questions  hiring  outcomes  JCK 
january 2013 by jerryking
Ten ways to better your business (and yourself) in 2013 - The Globe and Mail
Noah Fleming

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Dec. 21 2012
JCK  self-improvement 
december 2012 by jerryking
Making the Change From Middle Manager To a Seat at the Top - WSJ.com
July 7, 1998 | WSJ | By HAL LANCASTER

Less surprising, delivering results matters. Thinking strategically, being persuasive, being politically adroit and having a "significantly broader organizational awareness" also tend to make up a successful manager, ...Earn respect for being exceptionally good at what you do and show that you can run a business independently. Translation: Deliver results without a lot of hand-holding....a seldom-mentioned trait: consistency. "They must show consistency in the decisions they make and in their behavior," ..."A lot of people fail to make the next move because they really don't understand" how to assess risk," she says. "Or they don't have a Plan B."
Hal_Lancaster  ksfs  Managing_Your_Career  movingonup  executive_management  risk-assessment  risk-management  contingency_planning  JCK  transitions  companywide  middle_management  consistency  decision_making  Plan_B  off-plan  hand-holding  strategic_thinking  personal_accomplishments 
december 2012 by jerryking
Venture Accelerator Overview
Sales Process Tools (Prospecting, Qualifying, Proposing, Closing, Roll-out)

Call Plans, Activity Targets, Sales Deliverables, Funnel Checklist, Forecast Process, Sales presentations, Sales Force Automation.
JCK  sales  sales_cycle  sales_presentations  sales_teams  sales_training  selling  templates 
december 2012 by jerryking
Build a Practice Niche by Assisting Clients with Business Planning
Dec 1991 | The Practical Accountant | by Mark Scally and Mark C. Smitt.
Smaller companies tend not to have any formal business plans, and those that do often fail to implement them properly. Accountants ran assist their clients wlth the business planning process. The process must be tallored for each company's unique characteristics, and every consultant uses a slightly different process. The following process has been adapted from the traditional model to fit the typical closely held business: 1. Analyze internal and external factors. 2. Develop a mlssion statement. 3. Set goals. 4. Develop a marketing and sales strategy. 5. Perform financial projections. 6. Draft action plans. 7. lmplement the plan. 8. Put the proper organizational structure and management team in place. 9. Implement the necessary information systems. The planning process gives closely held companies a comprehensive approach for responding to uncertain economic times.
business_planning  management_consulting  niches  small_business  privately_held_companies  JCK  uncertainty  action_plans  mission_statements  goal-setting  implementation  organizational_structure  formalization  professionalization 
august 2012 by jerryking
How to Add Innovation To an Arduous Job Search
How to Add Innovation
To an Arduous Job Search


By Sinara Stull O'Donnell
job_search  innovation  Managing_Your_Career  JCK  arduous 
august 2012 by jerryking
New Year's Resolution 2002
1. Resolve to stay brutally optimistic.
2. Resolve to identify the most powerful benefit you offer to the people around you and then deliver it. (See below)
3. Resolve to pump up your personal vitality. How do I retain personal vitality?
[Personal vitality measures overall health in four key areas:
Physical
Mental
Emotional
Purpose – INTERESTING! (I believe that having a sense of individual life purpose is absolutely fundamental to personal happiness and contentment ]
4. Resolve to be habitually generous.
5. Resolve to go on a mental diet.
6. Resolve to be a global citizen, fully open to the cultures and influences of others.
7. Resolve to take control of your destiny.
8. Resolve to increase your human connectedness. Network.
9. Resolve to increase your creativity by letting go of the familiar. If innovation is everything, how do I institutionalize it in my personal life? Innovation ==> change strategy ==> succeed because they are subversive. Be a heretic!!!
10. Resolve to be you because others are already taken.

Practice adding value to things--ideas to make things worth more.
Practice adding value to people--what can I do to help my colleagues become more effective?
Practice adding value to myself--what can I do to make myself more valuable today?
heretical  inspiration  motivations  fitness  indispensable  serving_others  value_creation  resolutions  unconventional_thinking  JCK  affirmations  optimism  authenticity  generosity  Communicating_&_Connecting  subversion  purpose  networking  creative_renewal  personal_energy 
august 2012 by jerryking
Eight Principles of Strategic Wealth Management
August 09, 2006 | Knowledge@Wharton | by Stuart E. Lucas.
1. Take charge and do it early.
2. Align family and business interests around wealth-building goals and strategies.
3. Create a culture of accountability.
4. Capitalize on your family's combined resources.
5. Delegate, empower, and respect independence.
6. Diversify but focus.
7. Err on the side of simplicity where possible.
8. Develop future family leaders with strong wealth management skills.
wealth_management  rules_of_the_game  Wharton  personal_finance  wealth_creation  accountability  strategic_thinking  leadership_development  simplicity  JCK  business_interests  family_interests  diversification  focus  Michael_McDerment  aligned_interests 
august 2012 by jerryking
Successfully working with a consultant
Organizational Member Consultant Packet 2007-08
Organizations will find this packet useful as a guide for understanding the process of finding,selecting and working with consultants. It also includes templates and other information to help
make sure a consultant is selected that
management_consulting  JCK  howto 
july 2012 by jerryking
JCK Must Network More!
February 14, 2002 | Owen Gordon
Your last comment notwithstanding, the biggest disadvantage that independents like you have in this day and age is no longer technology faxes, emails, etc.) nor scale: it's reach.You were not afforded the luxury of having a high profile middle to senior management position as your precipice from which to launch into independent consulting from. Therefore, you need formal mechanisms that allow you to “work a room" and eloquent yourself with, oh I don't know. say. 10 new people a month. They're not always going to be key (sorry you didn't run into 10 people who know Medical Transcription cold) but if you keep in peripheral contact, it grows over time. Remember, a whole lot of people who might be useful now lawyers, people who know people with money. people with connected into health-care}, you might have simply ignored 2 years ago if you went to TVG with your Telecom blinders on.
The key to your future success is not about Jerry King in a room with the light bulb going off on the greatest mousetrap or business model or process or strategy that no one else thought of. Regardless of the amount of empirical primary research you do in your room, the odds of you zigging when everyone else zagging is remote. And it's even remoter that you are going to have all the wherewith all and resources to execute from Lyons Ht. Road. The key is people. in fast, someone with half your brains and business sense and no formal post-graduate education might have an easier time getting one of your proposals off of the ground just based on the network effect and the six degrees of separation/Kevin Bacon rule. If TVG isn't offering up those people then fine. But make dog gone sure that you have a suitable replacement that offers the scope and diversity of players under one roof. To hell with the quality of the keynote speakers address.
OG
p.s. if your Carecore thing is starting to move, why don't you form a small board of advisors comprised of people who's judgment you trust - net only w.r.t. the business model but people with judgment who've acted as career coaches for you like Snelgrove, etc. You'd use these people to vet all kind of ideas. "How do i get the first meeting with the top dog at that hospital in Buffalo." "Do I incorporate a separate entity from Carecor and if so, what should I look for. what should be the share ownership structure?" "What are the next hurdles, roadblocks-as that I can expect 3 months from now and how do I begin to anticipate them?
JCK  networking  management_consulting  Owen_Gordon  associations  business_development 
july 2012 by jerryking
What is JCK's Value Proposition2
October 18, 2002 | Owen Gordon

It ain't sexy, Jerry. But I suspect that most successful consultants out there simply start out as a business-head for hire. then after getting some assignments continually in a particular area, claim to have expertise in that particular core competency, THEN think about where's the best place they could apply "this' to get the biggest bang for the buck. So first you have to define what the "this" is. then hone it‘ then market it. Examples would be "I write business plans for emerging high technology start-ups soup to nuts"; "I do primary market research using Statscan. IMS, etc. in order to estimate sizes of markets for initial product launches- primarily consumer-oriented products"; set up or broker distributorship partnerships for international businesses looking to have representation in Canada‘; I advise companies on how to re-invent their brand through my knowledge of various media vehicles. ad campaigns plus in~store promotions?
Do you see the kind of specificity you're going to have to hone in on and hang your hat on in order to drive business? I'm not saying you're doing it but terms like "Strategic Consulting" are almost meaningless in this day and age unless: a) You're McKinsey or someone, or; b) You're dealing with very unsaavy people. i.e. you're helping a saw mill in the Eastern Townships of Quebec because no one there knows the first thing about business or has even graduated high school. For any kind of Toronto-based business with any degree of sophistication. you're going to have to be more focused and "on message” in terms of what it is that you provide.
JCK  value_propositions  Owen_Gordon  management_consulting  specificity 
july 2012 by jerryking
Questions Every Entrepreneur Should Ask
November-December 1996 | HBR | by Amar Bhidé.

Based on his observations of several hundred start-up ventures over eight years, Amar Bhide has developed a three-step sequence of questions that all entrepreneurs must ask themselves in order to establish priorities among the vast array of opportunities and problems they face: What are my goals? Do I have the right strategy? Can I execute the strategy?
HBR  Amar_Bhidé  questions  start_ups  entrepreneur  JCK  think_threes 
june 2012 by jerryking
Tom Calow_Critique of JCK Marketing Collateral
October 11, 2002 | e-mail from Tom Calow to Jerry King suggesting language to draft marketing collateral. Speak in plain English
e-mail  JCK  personal_branding  marketing 
june 2012 by jerryking
uToronto_data feeds
July 6, 2004

My initial questions are: what sort of data-generating events would be of most interest to U of T's varied stakeholders? As an example. what if U of T was to track in real time the volume of activity at the check out counter at Roberts Library, or the utilization of its parking lots, or the utilization of student computing facilities, or the onlihe registration into specific courses. or the arrival of grant monies? Could the capture, storage and analysis of this information allow individual stakeholders to save time or to make better decisions? Could broadcasting this information improve the perception of the University's commitment to customer service? Would some stakeholders be willing to pay for this information? If so. how much? What about tragic events e.g. alerting stakeholders to a localized disaster’? Can one really charge for that service or is that more of a public good like a free 911 call?
jck  Paul_Kedrosky  Andy_Kessler  hacks  data  uToronto  syndications  real-time  public_goods 
june 2012 by jerryking
Why I returned to the corporate world - The Globe and Mail
GABRIELLA O’ROURKE

The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Jun. 05 2012
small_business  JCK 
june 2012 by jerryking
Build Your Personal Value Proposition
Executives set value propositions for their products — the target market segments, the benefits they provide, and their prices. It's why a target customer should buy the product.

But value propositions go beyond just products. Your personal value proposition (PVP) is at the heart of your career strategy. It's the foundation for everything in a job search and career progression — targeting potential employers, attracting the help of others, and explaining why you're the one to pick. It's why to hire you, not someone else.

The question is this: How do you develop a powerful PVP?

Take a look at Steve (name has been changed). Steve is a tall, 54-year-old manufacturing executive. Steve's interest and skill at manufacturing operations is the cornerstone of his PVP.

It's hard to know what you're really good at. You need more than the ordinary, convenient categories. I seek the kinds of things where I fit naturally, what I enjoy. That's not consumer products, not hard science, not financial institutions, and not an enterprise that's pursuing something other than long-term financial objectives. I look for operations-intensive companies who can benefit from significant performance improvement. I take floundering institutions and go build things. It's not quite turnaround, not slash and burn; but it's a far way from peaceful stewardship of assets. I'm a go-build guy.

Steve targets companies from $150 million sales up to $1 billion. He doesn't want start-ups, where everything would need to be set up, or a company so large that he couldn't know people down the line. He prefers private companies. With no experience with the special duties of a public corporation's CEO, he feels it doesn't make sense to have to learn all that on the job at this point in his work life.

Steve also emphasizes his view of the right atmosphere: "I'm not at all into sleazy places, nor into industries like tobacco, alcohol, or casinos. Ethically-challenged places are no fun." We could debate whether those industries pose ethical issues, but that's not the point. They aren't right for him.

Steve's leaving out the great majority of corporations, but that doesn't limit him. He gets three or four calls a year asking him to consider a corporate CEO position. Those calls come both because he's a strong candidate for jobs where he fits and because the people who call know that. They don't call about everything. They call about positions that connect to Steve's PVP. It's easy to understand where he's strong and what he wants to do. His PVP is distinctive, unlike what similarly qualified executives might say about themselves.

Here are four steps to develop a strong PVP:
Set a clear target. The PVP begins with a target, one that needs what you have to offer. You'll prefer some directions, not others. Targeting will make you most effective.
Identify your strengths. It may sound obvious, but what you know and what you can do are the foundation of your PVP. Hone in on what those are.
Tie your strengths to your target position. Don't leave it up to the employer to figure out how your strengths relate to what she needs. Let your PVP tightly connect you to the position. Connect the dots for her. Consider her perspective and know why she should hire you or promote you.
Provide evidence and success stories. Your strengths may be what an employer is "buying," but your achievements are the evidence you have those strengths. They make your case convincing. Some people prepare a non-confidential portfolio to showcase that evidence in a vivid way. They collect reports they wrote that had impact. They pull together facts on measurable achievements such as sales growth or cost reduction.

Steve's target — mid-sized, privately-held industrial companies that need significant operations improvement to enable growth — is an excellent example of the first of these steps. He's setting himself up in his distinct target area, where his network knows him well. His past success demonstrates that he has the capability and emphasizes his strengths. In all of this, Steve's intrinsic quality is critical to his success, but it's not the whole story. It's through his PVP that Steve's making the most of his talents.

As you think about your own career strategy, think about Steve and his narrowly defined and distinctive PVP. What's your value proposition?
entrepreneurship  JCK  job_search  Managing_Your_Career  personal_accomplishments  personal_branding  via:jb19012  value_propositions  special_sauce 
april 2012 by jerryking
Find a Job Using Disruptive Innovation - Jeff Dyer and Hal Gregersen - Harvard Business Review
10:55 AM Wednesday March 7, 2012
by Jeff Dyer and Hal Gregersen

* Innovator's DNA

Disruptive innovators ask the right questions, observe the world like anthropologists, network for novel ideas, and experiment to make things work. (For a more detailed look at these skills, see The Innovator's DNA).
anthropologists  asking_the_right_questions  books  disruption  ideas  innovation  JCK  job_search  Managing_Your_Career  new_graduates  novel  questions  skills 
march 2012 by jerryking
Do Your Commitments Match Your Convictions?
January 2005 | HBR | By Donald N. Sull & Dominic Houlder
The Idea in Brief
How many of us struggle harder every day to uphold obligations to our bosses, families, and communities--even as the quality of our lives erodes? And how many of us feel too overwhelmed to examine the causes of this dilemma? For most people, it takes a crisis--illness, divorce, death of a loved one, business failure--before we'll
refocus our commitments of money, time, and energy on what really matters to us. But why wait for a crisis? Instead, use a systematic process to periodically clarify your convictions and assess
whether you're putting your money (and time and energy) where your mouth is. Identify high-priority values that are receiving insufficient resources--or outdated commitments that are siphoning precious resources away from your deepest convictions.
Once you've spotted gaps between what matters most to you and how you're investing your resources, use a time-out (a sabbatical, course, or retreat) to rethink old commitments and define new
ones more consistent with your values. By routinely applying this process, you--not your past obligations--will determine the direction your life takes.

The Idea in Practice
To manage the gap between your convictions and commitments, apply the following steps.
Inventory Your Values
List the things that matter most to you, in specific language. For example, instead of "Money," write,
"Providing financial security to my family," or "Earning enough to retire early." Aim for five to ten
values, and write what you honestly value--not what you think you should value.
Assess How You're Investing Your Resources
Track how much money, time, and energy you're devoting to your values. For each value you've
listed, record the following:
• Percentage of your household income you devote to that value
- 2 -
• Number of hours per week you spend on the value
• Quality of energy (high, low) you devote to activities related to that value. (An hour spent on an
activity when you're fresh and focused represents a greater commitment than an hour spent when
you're exhausted and distracted.)
Identify Gaps Between Your Values and Commitments
Do some values on your list receive little or none of your money, time, and energy? Is there a single
value that sucks a disproportionate share of your resources away from other priorities?
Understand What Has Caused the Gaps
Disconnects between what you value and how you actually spend your time can have several
causes. Perhaps you've taken on obligations without considering the long-term ramifications. One
successful entrepreneur in New York had promised to spend more time with her London-based
partner. But when she decided to sell her start-up to a West Coast competitor through a five-year
earn-out deal, she had to move to San Francisco to run the business. She now spends even more
time airborne--torn between two conflicting commitments she made simultaneously.
Or maybe you've let others define "success" for you. One young banker earned colleagues' praise
for his extreme work ethic. When he became a father, he wanted to spend more time with his family,
which baffled his colleagues. Because he badly desired continued praise from colleagues, he
continued his workaholic ways--and effectively gave his colleagues the power to set his priorities.
Change Course
It's harder to recalibrate commitments when you're not facing a crisis. A time-out--a sabbatical,
course, or other device--can help you reflect and give you an excuse to break old commitments and
forge new ones. To avoid "commitment creep," abandon or renegotiate one old commitment for every
new one you make.
commitments  convictions  disproportionality  Donald_Sull  financial_security  HBR  indispensable  JCK  Managing_Your_Career  overwhelmed  reflections  resolutions  sabbaticals  slack_time  timeouts  values  what_really_matters 
march 2012 by jerryking
globeadvisor.com: 10 building blocks for employee engagement
February 27, 2012 | G&M | HARVEY SCHACHTER.

Make client goals your top priority

New York-based marketing consultant Andrew Sobel once asked a highly successful rainmaker what his secret was for bringing in so much business.

The answer was in the man's shirt pocket, where he kept a sheet of paper with the names of each client. Next to each name was that executive's most important goals. "My job in life is to help them accomplish those goals," the rainmaker said.
Harvey_Schachter  employee_engagement  rainmaking  JCK  networking 
march 2012 by jerryking
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