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jerryking : joblessness   14

Devah Pager, Who Documented Race Bias in Job Market, Dies at 46 - The New York Times
By Katharine Q. Seelye
Nov. 8, 2018

Devah Pager wrote in her book, “Marked: Race, Crime and Finding Work in an Era of Mass Incarceration.
PhDs  obituaries  professors  race  biases  racial_disparities  sociologists  racial_discrimination  joblessness  mass_incarceration 
november 2018 by jerryking
America’s hidden crisis: Men not at work - The Globe and Mail
MARGARET WENTE
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Oct. 15, 2016

The United States’ biggest problem ... is more insidious. Millions of able-bodied men have dropped out of society – out of working life, of civic life, of family life. Many of these men belong to the Trumpenproletariat. How to re-engage them may be the biggest domestic challenge the country faces.

Political economist Nicholas Eberstadt calls these men “the unworking,” to distinguish them from people who want work but can’t find it. “America is now home to a vast army of jobless men who are no longer even looking for work,” he writes. “Roughly seven million of them age 25 to 54, the traditional prime of working life.” His new book, Men Without Work: America’s Invisible Crisis, is essential reading for this election cycle. “For every prime-age man who is unemployed today,” he writes, “another three are neither working nor looking for work.” Most of these men are less educated, and many, particularly blacks, have prison records.... in fact, the work rate has been in decline for two generations. What happened during those decades was a massive shift in cultural values.... “To the extent that non-work is contagious, it is likely to grow exponentially rather than at a linear rate.” If current trends continue, he expects that more than one-third of all men in the 25-54 age group will be out of work by mid-century. That is a truly terrifying prospect – as well as fertile soil for toxic populism.

At its root, the collapse of the working class isn’t so much economic as it is social, moral and spiritual. This means that economic remedies will only take us so far. Marriage rates for less-educated men have plunged – and unmarried men are far more likely to opt for unwork. The percentage of babies born to unmarried parents has soared. Working-class whites have largely abandoned church (while church attendance among higher-income whites has stayed relatively high). Family and community networks have dissolved [JCK: the fraying of what David Brooks would call, the "social_fabric"].
Margaret_Wente  unemployment  men  joblessness  working_class  social_classes  social_fabric  Larry_Summers  job_destruction  participation_rates  addictions  opiates  socioeconomic  habits  values  books  unworking  populism  social_crisis  moral_crisis  spiritual_crisis  cultural_values  whites  contagions  exponential 
october 2016 by jerryking
America’s racial divide widens under Obama’s watch - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, May. 07 2015,

African-Americans are sliding down an economic ladder they had been gradually climbing. Millions of black people who moved north during the Great Migration of the mid-20th century found jobs in bustling factories. Millions more found public-sector jobs – as teachers, postal employees or city workers – as black people took over city governments and congressional seats in places such as Baltimore and Detroit. These workers formed the basis of a black middle class.

But the previous recession hit black people harder than any other group. Manufacturing was shedding jobs before the crash; governments and the post office followed suit when it hit. As Bard College professor Walter Russell Mead has noted, black people accounted for less than 12 per cent of the U.S. work force in 2011, but 21 per cent of postal employees and 20 per cent of all government workers. But with government and manufacturing in retreat, black people faced bleak job prospects.

The new economy is largely a black-free zone. A USA Today analysis last year found that African-Americans occupied only 2 per cent of the jobs at seven big Silicon Valley companies. That’s not hard to understand given the state of public schools in places such as Baltimore, Detroit and Washington, where political nepotism and unions have stood in the way of reform.

Meanwhile, systemic racism in the U.S. criminal justice system – black people are far more likely than white people to be sentenced to jail for minor drug violations, ending up with criminal records that make them virtually unemployable – is so deep as to cry out for a national inquiry.
racial_disparities  Silicon_Valley  Ted_Cruz  Konrad_Yakabuski  Campaign_2016  digital_economy  race_relations  Obama  downward_mobility  African-Americans  public_sector  middle_class  Walter_Russell_Mead  systemic_discrimination  criminal_justice_system  joblessness  public_schools  Great_Migration  sentencing  downward_spirals  institutional_path_dependency 
may 2015 by jerryking
Hasta la vista, employment - The Globe and Mail
DOUG SAUNDERS
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, May. 02 2015

Next week, right on time, will see the publication of Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future, by the Silicon Valley software guru Martin Ford. It doesn’t mention Mr. Rifkin, but it argues that new, even smarter technology is now impinging on the medical and educational work forces.

Our era “will be defined by a fundamental shift in the relationship between workers and machines,” Mr. Ford writes. “That shift will ultimately challenge one of our most basic assumptions about technology: That machines are tools that increase the productivity of workers. Instead, machines themselves are turning into workers, and the line between the capability of labour and capital is blurring as never before.” As a result, he concludes in a déjà vu-inducing passage, “the virtuous feedback loop between productivity, rising wages and increasing consumer spending will collapse.”
Doug_Saunders  unemployment  middle_class  productivity  consumer_spending  books  joblessness  automation  robotics  artificial_intelligence 
may 2015 by jerryking
Forcing Black Men Out of Society - NYTimes.com
Devah Pager

This astounding shortfall in black men translates into lower marriage rates, more out-of-wedlock births, a greater risk of poverty for families and, by extension, less stable communities. The missing men should be a source of concern to political leaders and policy makers everywhere.

While the 1.5 million number is startling, it actually understates the severity of the crisis that has befallen African-American men since the collapse of the manufacturing and industrial centers, which was quickly followed by the “war on drugs” and mass imprisonment, which drove up the national prison population more than sevenfold beginning in the 1970s.

In addition to the “missing,” millions more are shut out of society, or are functionally missing, because of the shrinking labor market for low-skilled workers, racial discrimination or sanctions that prevent millions who have criminal convictions from getting all kinds of jobs. At the same time, the surge in imprisonment has further stigmatized blackness itself, so that black men and boys who have never been near a jail now have to fight the presumption of criminality in many aspects of day-to-day life — in encounters with police, in schools, on the streets and on the job....William Julius Wilson wrote in his 1996 book, “When Work Disappears,” for the first time in the 20th century, most adults in many poor inner-city neighborhoods were not working.... Devah Pager wrote in her book, “Marked: Race, Crime and Finding Work in an Era of Mass Incarceration.”
understated  African-Americans  men  criminality  incarceration  racial_disparities  racial_discrimination  books  stereotypes  children  deindustrialization  war_on_drugs  stigmatization  family_breakdown  instability  unemployment  mass_incarceration  joblessness  William_Julius_Wilson  blackness  presumptions 
april 2015 by jerryking
Toronto wise to hold off celebrating Wynne’s victory - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 13 2014

Ontario, and by extension its capital city, is facing big challenges. Once the dynamo of the national economy, the province is struggling to create jobs and maintain growth. Joblessness runs consistently above the national average. Ontario’s troubles have obvious and serious effects on Toronto. This city is in the process of moving from big city to true metropolis. Hundreds of thousands of immigrants are arriving every decade from all corners of the world. The city is growing up (quite literally, in its booming downtown). Will it thrive on this growth or choke on it?

To cope, Toronto needs to invest in transit, roads, water systems and other key infrastructure. It needs to reform its often-inept city government, making it leaner and more responsive. If it is to overcome the stresses of growth and continue to thrive in the coming years, it needs the consistent help of the provincial government, to which city hall is tightly tethered.

More than that, it needs Ontario to succeed. Ontario’s problem is Toronto’s problem.

Mr. Hudak’s Conservatives and Ms. Wynne’s Liberals offered starkly different solutions. Mr. Hudak promised to cut big government down to size, trim corporate taxes and spur job creation that way. Ms. Wynne promised to invest instead of cut, pouring money into transit and other needs.
Marcus_Gee  Toronto  Kathleen_Wynne  Ontario  Liberals  joblessness  job_creation  immigrants  immigration  responsiveness 
june 2014 by jerryking
More Men in Prime Working Ages Don't Have Jobs - WSJ.com
By
Mark Peters and
David Wessel
connect
Updated Feb. 6, 2014
men  unemployment  joblessness 
february 2014 by jerryking
Davos diary: A new angst settles over the world's elites - The Globe and Mail
John Stackhouse - Editor-in-Chief

Davos, Switzerland — The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Jan. 24 2014,

Another machine revolution is upon us. There is a new wave forming behind the past decade’s surge of mobile technology, with disruptive technologies like driverless cars and automated personal medical assistants that will not only change lifestyles but rattle economies and change pretty much every assumption about work....For all the talk of growth, though, the global economy is also in an employment morass that has the smartest people in the room humbled and anxious. The rebound is not producing jobs and pay increases to the degree that many of them expected. Most governments are tapped out, fiscally, and can only call on the private sector – “the innovators” – to do more....If a 3-D printer can kneecap your construction industry, or an AI-powered sensor put to pasture half your nurses, what hope is there for old-fashioned job creation?

The new digital divide – it used to be about access, now it’s about employment – stands to further isolate the millions of long-term jobless people in Europe and North America, many of whom have left the workforce and won’t be getting calls when jobs come back.... Say’s Law--a theory that says successful products create their own demand.
creating_demand  Davos  John_Stackhouse  Say’s_Law  Eric_Schmidt  Google  McKinsey  creative_destruction  Joseph_Schumpeter  unemployment  machine_learning  disruption  autonomous_vehicles  bots  chatbots  artificial_intelligence  personal_assistants  virtual_assistants  job_creation  digital_disruption  joblessness  fault_lines  global_economy 
january 2014 by jerryking
Free-Market Socialism - NYTimes.com
By DAVID BROOKS
January 23, 2012

Adam Davidson’s illuminating article in the current issue of The Atlantic is important because it shows the interplay between economic forces (globalization and technology) and social forces (single parenthood and the breakdown of community support). Globalization and technological change increase the demands on workers; social decay makes it harder for them to meet those demands.

Across America, millions of mothers can’t rise because they don’t have adequate support systems as they try to improve their skills. Tens of millions of children have poor life chances because they grow up in disorganized environments that make it hard to acquire the social, organizational and educational skills they will need to become productive workers.

Tens of millions of men have marred life chances because schools are bad at educating boys, because they are not enmeshed in the long-term relationships that instill good habits and because insecure men do stupid and self-destructive things.

Over the past 40 years, women’s wages have risen sharply but, as Michael Greenstone and Adam Looney of the Hamilton Project point out, median incomes of men have dropped 28 percent and male labor force participation rates are down 16 percent. Next time somebody talks to you about wage stagnation, have them break it down by sex. It’s not only globalization and technological change causing this stagnation. It’s the deterioration of the moral and social landscape, especially for men.
children  David_Brooks  disorganization  equality_of_opportunity  family  family_breakdown  gender_gap  globalization  habits  insecurity  joblessness  Obama  relationships  self-destructive  single_parents  social_decay  social_fabric  support_systems  technological_change  underclass  wage_stagnation 
january 2012 by jerryking
The Missing Fifth - NYTimes.com
May 9, 2011| NYT | By DAVID BROOKS. Americans should be
especially alert to signs that the country is becoming less vital &
industrious. One of those signs comes from the labor market. As my
colleague David Leonhardt points out, in 1954, about 96 % of American
men between the ages of 25 & 54 worked. Today that number is around
80 %. One-fifth of all men in their prime working ages are not getting
up & going to work...The result is this: There are more idle men now
than at any time since the Great Depression, & this time the
problem is mostly structural, not cyclical. These men will find it hard
to attract spouses. Many will pick up habits that have a corrosive
cultural influence on those around them. The country will not benefit
from their potential abilities. This is a big problem. It can’t be
addressed through the sort of short-term Keynesian stimulus some on the
left are still fantasizing about. It can’t be solved by simply reducing
the size of govt. as some on the right imagine.
cultural_corrosion  David_Brooks  gender_gap  unemployment  men  Great_Depression  participation_rates  structural_change  Keynesian  joblessness  habits  values 
may 2011 by jerryking
The Hidden Job Crisis for American Men -
April 7, 2011 BusinessWeek By Peter Coy. Men are
disappearing from the workplace in ways that don't always register on
the official unemployment rate
unemployment  labour  race  Freshbooks  workforce_planning  statistics  crisis  hidden  joblessness 
april 2011 by jerryking
Less Educated Men Face Brutal Job Market - WSJ.com
MAY 6, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By DAVID WESSEL. It's
hard to exaggerate how bad the job market is. Here's one arresting fact:
One of every five men 25 to 54 isn't working. Even more alarming, the
jobs that many of these men, or those like them, once had in
construction, factories and offices aren't coming back. "A good guess…is
that when the economy recovers five years from now, one in six men who
are 25 to 54 will not be working," Lawrence Summers, the president's
economic adviser, said the other day.
David_Wessel  unemployment  African-Americans  gender_gap  masculinity  joblessness 
may 2010 by jerryking

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