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Opinion | I Headed the F.B.I. and C.I.A. There’s a Dire Threat to the Country I Love. - The New York Times
By William Webster
Mr. Webster is a former federal judge and the former director of both the F.B.I. and the C.I.A.

Dec. 16, 2019
CIA  Donald_Trump  FBI  judges  public_service  security_&_intelligence  threats 
10 weeks ago by jerryking
‘I Wish You Bad Luck,’ He Said With Good Intentions
Dec. 28, 2017 | WSJ | By Bob Greene.

In Spring 2017, Chief Justice John Roberts delivered a commencement address to his son's grade 9 graduation ceremony that offered a universal lesson about the value to be found in generosity of spirit. Roberts prepared the advice offered in his speech specifically for the commencement address, as he set out to reflect upon “some of the harsh realities that everyone will face in the course of a full life,” and how to anticipate them and learn from them....His speech was structured in pairs.....He told his audience that commencement speakers will typically “wish you good luck and extend good wishes to you. I will not do that, and I’ll tell you why.

“From time to time in the years to come, I hope you will be treated unfairly, so that you will come to know the value of justice.

“I hope that you will suffer betrayal, because that will teach you the importance of loyalty.

“Sorry to say, but I hope you will be lonely from time to time so that you don’t take friends for granted.

“I wish you bad luck, again, from time to time so that you will be conscious of the role of chance in life, and understand that your success is not completely deserved and that the failure of others is not completely deserved either.

“And when you lose, as you will from time to time, I hope every now and then your opponent will gloat over your failure. It is a way for you to understand the importance of sportsmanship.

“I hope you’ll be ignored so that you know the importance of listening to others, and I hope you will have just enough pain to learn compassion.

“Whether I wish these things or not, they’re going to happen. And whether you benefit from them or not will depend upon your ability to see the message in your misfortunes.”

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Also,......“Once a week, you should write a note to someone. Not an email. A note on a piece of paper. It will take you exactly 10 minutes.” Then, Roberts urged, put the note in an envelope and send it off the old way: via the mail.

The handwritten note, he said, might express appreciation for someone who has helped you out or treated you with kindness, and who may not know how grateful you are.........here’s a toast to bad luck, and to its hidden gifts. First, though, the corner mailbox awaits. Gratitude is priceless, but conveying it costs no more than a postage stamp.
advice  betrayals  chance  commencement  failure  friendships  gratitude  handwritten  John_Roberts  judges  justice  life_skills  loyalty  luck  pairs  speeches  sportsmanship  U.S._Supreme_Court  values  compassion  listening  inspiration  teachable_moments  counterintuitive  tough_love  good_intentions 
may 2019 by jerryking
Big data: legal firms play ‘Moneyball’
February 6, 2019 | Financial Times | Barney Thompson.

Is the hunt for data-driven justice a gimmick or a powerful tool to give lawyers an advantage and predict court outcomes?

In Philip K Dick’s short story The Minority Report, a trio of “precogs” plugged into a machine are used to foretell all crimes so potential felons could be arrested before they were able to strike. In real life, a growing number of legal experts and computer scientists are developing tools they believe will give lawyers an edge in lawsuits and trials. 

Having made an impact in patent cases these legal analytics companies are now expanding into a broad range of areas of commercial law. This is not about replacing judges,” says Daniel Lewis, co-founder of Ravel Law, a San Francisco lawtech company that built the database of judicial behaviour. “It is about showing how they make decisions, what they find persuasive and the patterns of how they rule.” 
analytics  data_driven  judges  law  law_firms  lawtech  lawyers  Lex_Machina  massive_data_sets  Moneyball  predictive_modeling  quantitative  tools 
february 2019 by jerryking
Sandra Day O’Connor, first female justice on U.S. Supreme Court, reveals she has dementia - The Globe and Mail
OCTOBER 23, 2018 | THE NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | MATTHEW HAAG.

Ms. O’Connor was born in El Paso, Texas, and grew up in Arizona on the Lazy B Ranch, 250 square miles of high desert along the state’s border with New Mexico. Her upbringing has remained a point of pride, and she has often referred to herself as a cowgirl.

“It is possible to survive and even make a living in that formidable terrain,” she wrote in her memoir of her childhood, “Lazy B,” in 2002. “The Day family did it for years; but it was never easy. It takes planning, patience, skill and endurance.”

She left Arizona for Stanford Law School, where she finished third in her class in 1952. It was also where she met her future husband, a fellow law-review editor at the university.

The top graduate in her class was William H. Rehnquist, the future chief justice, who received a clerkship on the Supreme Court.
cancers  civics  dementia  judges  lawyers  Sandra_Day_O'Connor  trailblazers  U.S._Supreme_Court  women  Alzheimer’s_disease 
october 2018 by jerryking
Trailblazing judge George Ethelbert Carter embodied ethics - The Globe and Mail
JOHN LORINC
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL

become not only one of Toronto’s first black lawyers, but also this country’s first Canadian-born black judge. A member of the Order of Ontario and a Queen’s Counsel, he died in Toronto on June 7 at the age of 96.

Justice Carter loomed large among black lawyers and judges, and also in Canada’s legal profession generally, observes Toronto criminal lawyer Selwyn Pieters. “He exuded the ethical principles and professionalism lawyers strive to live by. He was a role model and a trailblazer.”
African_Canadians  John_Lorinc  judges  lawyers  obituaries  trailblazers 
june 2018 by jerryking
Sandra Day O'Connor and Jeff J. Curley: Founding Principles in the Digital Age - WSJ.com
April 21, 2014 | WSJ | By SANDRA DAY O'CONNOR And JEFF J. CURLEY

The College Board and Khan Academy—a nonprofit digital education platform—will partner to provide "free, world-class test prep" for the new exam.

These changes may sound unrelated, but they represent a fascinating paradox in education today: What is old in education has never been more important, but it may take what is new in education to truly prepare students for success in college, career and civic life.

Teaching the Constitution and the nation's other foundational texts is as old as public education itself. America's public schools were founded on the idea that education is vital to the success of democracy. But these texts are demanding and complex. Understanding them takes hard work and concentration. The effort is invaluable, though, not least because it instills the discipline that will equip young people with the knowledge and the habits of mind necessary to become powerful actors in civic life.

Millions of students taking the SAT will now encounter texts like the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, as well as the writings of individuals from James Madison to Martin Luther King Jr. But old test-prep methods like flashcards and rote memorization will not be sufficient. Students will need more sophisticated tools to help them understand the material and engage with it. Digital technology will be essential to achieving that goal.
civics  SAT  Khan_Academy  high_schools  students  tools  digital_media  standardized_testing  engaged_citizenry  public_education  constitutions  hard_work  foundational  education  paradoxes  platforms  judges  lawyers  Sandra_Day_O'Connor 
april 2014 by jerryking
Canada’s real wealth lies in its institutional integrity, not its resources - The Globe and Mail
BRIAN LEE CROWLEY
Canada’s real wealth lies in its institutional integrity, not its resources Add to ...
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Apr. 17 2014

Canada’s wealth, and the reason why the world beats a path to our resources, lies not in the resources themselves. What makes that endowment almost uniquely valuable in the world is that it exists within another vastly more important endowment of rules, institutions and behaviours.

My list of those institutions and behaviours include the rule of law; independent judges and reasonably speedy and reliable resolution of disputes; the enforcement of contract; the absence of corruption among government officials and the police; respect of private property; a moderate, predictable and stable taxation and regulatory burden; a stable currency that keeps its value; responsible public finances; freedom to trade both domestically and internationally; a well-developed work ethic; and a refusal to resort to violence to resolve political disagreements. That is the greatest endowment that we have.

What happens when you nest a rich natural resource endowment inside this endowment of rules, institutions and behaviours? Companies can invest billions of dollars to unlock opportunities, such as the oil sands, reasonably secure in the knowledge that they know the fiscal, regulatory and contractual conditions they will face over a period of years that are sufficient to recoup their investment and make some money.
natural_resources  institution-building  institutions  Canada  independent_judiciary  integrity  political_infrastructure  predictability  property_rights  civics  rule_of_law  institutional_integrity  work_ethic  oil_sands  judiciary  judges 
april 2014 by jerryking
Life’s Work: Sandra Day O’Connor
December 2013 | Harvard Business Review |Interviewed by Alison Beard .
HBR  U.S._Supreme_Court  women  lawyers  mentoring  interviews  civics  judges  Sandra_Day_O'Connor 
december 2013 by jerryking
A Place Called Heaven_pgs. 82-83
1996 | Cecil Foster

Progress will come only through economic independence, the Chief Justice argues, because only then will Blacks be free of the control of other groups. Only then will they be beyond hoping that some politician will appoint one of them to some top job, even as chief justice. Blacks start having clout only when they take greater pride in their identity and work together, when they stop being distrustful of one another because they, too, might have bought into the negative stereotypes other groups have spread about Africans and descendants. “There is a complete absence of influence in matters that affect us as a community, as a people. An inability to lend a helping hand to brothers and sisters in need." the Chief Justice explains in the interview. Julius Isaac chooses his words carefully. pondering every question and occasionally pausing mid-sentence to reflect on what he is saying. "The last time l was in Toronto. l met a Jamaican fellow who told me that he owns a factory where he employs about 50 West Indians, and l thought that he is a unique individual. That is the sort of thing l am talking about: to have the ability to help and to influence the matters that affect our lives. We are at the mercy of other people in the community. You look around at the way in which the society is organized, and for want of a better word, you realize that it is organized on a tribal basis and that each tribe is vying for economic stability. ,I in order to ensure that matters that concern members of that tribe are disposed of in the most advantageous way. We are not able to do that. That is the nutshell of my thinking."
Part of the problem rests with society and the way it is organized. But Blacks must also take their share of the blame, he says. "We do not have the sharpened, acquisitive instinct. lf it is sharpened, it is in a very marginal way that affects a family or an individual. We haven't been able as a community in Canada to acquire significant pools of capital to put at the disposal of the community for its development. l think that is where the focus should be."
African_Canadians  capital_accumulation  capital_formation  distrust  disunity  economic_clout  economic_empowerment  economic_nationalism  ethnic_communities  judges  mindsets  producer_mindset  self-reliance  self-determination  strategic_thinking  tribes  trustworthiness 
january 2013 by jerryking
Taking One for the Country - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: June 30, 2012

"I found myself applauding for Chief Justice Roberts the same way I did for Al Gore when he gracefully bowed to the will of the Supreme Court in the 2000 election and the same way I do for those wounded warriors — and for the same reason: They each, in their own way, took one for the country.

To put it another way, Roberts undertook an act of statesmanship for the national good by being willing to anger his own “constituency” on a very big question. But he also did what judges should do: leave the big political questions to the politicians. The equivalent act of statesmanship on the part of our politicians now would be doing what Roberts deferred to them as their responsibility: decide the big, hard questions, with compromises, for the national good. Otherwise, we’re doomed to a tug of war on the deck of the Titanic, no matter what health care plan we have. "...Our newfound natural gas bounty can give us long-term access to cheap, cleaner energy and, combined with advances in robotics and software, is already bringing blue-collar manufacturing back to America. Web-enabled cellphones and tablets are creating vast new possibilities to bring high-quality, low-cost education to every community college and public school so people can afford to acquire the skills to learn 21st-century jobs. Cloud computing is giving anyone with a creative spark cheap, powerful tools to start a company with very little money. And dramatically low interest rates mean we can borrow to build new infrastructure — and make money.
Tom_Friedman  John_Roberts  U.S._Supreme_Court  judges  statesmanship  hydraulic_fracturing  natural_gas  cloud_computing  smartphones  robotics  software  interest_rates  infrastructure  automation  constituencies  low-interest  compromise  blue-collar  manufacturers  politicians  hard_questions  high-quality 
july 2012 by jerryking
Roberts v. the Future - New York Times
By JEFFREY ROSEN
Published: August 28, 2005

The lesson of this particular episode of history, Roberts seemed to suggest, was that politicians -- and judges, for that matter -- should be wary of the assumption that the future will be little more than an extension of things as they are.
U.S._Supreme_Court  John_Roberts  politicians  judges  future 
may 2012 by jerryking
Justice Julius Isaac ‘has left indelible mark on legal history’ | Share News – Local Canadian, Caribbean, Business and Political News
Posted by Arnold A. Auguste on Thursday, July 21st, 2011 in

Local News

Justice Julius Isaac

Justice Julius Isaac
By RON FANFAIR
obituaries  African_Canadians  judges  trailblazers 
july 2011 by jerryking
Obama Mentor Panned Sotomayor - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 29, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By JESS BRAVIN.
Tribe's assessment of the court's internal dynamics was consistent with
what other observers of the court have noted.
Sonia_Sotomayor  U.S._Supreme_Court  legal_analysis  judges 
october 2010 by jerryking
A Well-Traveled Path From Ivy League to Supreme Court -
September 6, 2010 | NYTimes.com | By ADAM LIPTAK. About half
of the law clerks who have served the justices since Chief Justice John
G. Roberts Jr. joined the court in 2005 attended two law schools —
Harvard and Yale. Another quarter attended just four others — Virginia,
Stanford, Chicago and Columbia.
U.S._Supreme_Court  law_schools  elitism  Ivy_League  law_students  judges 
september 2010 by jerryking
Kagan’s Climb Is Marked by Confidence and Canniness - Biography - NYTimes.com
May 10, 2010 | New York Times | This article is by Sheryl Gay Stolberg, Katharine Q. Seelye and Lisa W. Foderaro.
Elena_Kagan  nominees  U.S._Supreme_Court  profile  law  law_schools  judges 
may 2010 by jerryking
Court Opening Prompts Question About Whether Gender Matters - WSJ.com
MAY 14, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by JENNIFER S. FORSYTH.

Should minority (i.e. racial, gender, disabled) U.S. Supreme Court
justices see themselves as needing to represent the views of particular
groups, or as acting as an umpire who remains neutral about who wins and
loses?
U.S._Supreme_Court  nominees  disadvantages  law  legal  gender_gap  gender_relations  judges 
may 2009 by jerryking
Jewish human rights crusader took lead in demanding equality for all
February 11, 2009 | Special to The Globe and Mail | GAY ABBATE
obituary of SYDNEY HARRIS, 91: HUMAN RIGHTS ACTIVIST AND JURIST. Jewish
human rights crusader took lead in demanding equality for all. As an
activist he took a stand against neo-Nazis, as an Ontario judge his
rulings broke new ground.
human_rights  obituaries  judges 
april 2009 by jerryking

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