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Opinion | ‘You Promised You Wouldn’t Kill Me’ - The New York Times
By Kimberlé Crenshaw
Ms. Crenshaw is an expert on civil rights and black feminist legal theory.

Oct. 28, 2019
African-Americans  killings  women 
october 2019 by jerryking
Cause or effect? The link between gentrification and violent crime
July 12, 2018 | | Financial Times | by Nathan Brooker YESTERDAY.

London, which is experiencing a sustained increase in violent offences as crime rates in other global cities such as New York, Sydney and Hong Kong continue to fall......The escalation of violence has been linked to provocation on social media, increased competition in the drugs trade, a reduction in police measures such as stop and search and an overall drop in police funding— the Met has seen its annual budget cut by about 20 per cent since 2010-11, and it has lost 10 per cent of its police officers in that time......However, one factor that is often overlooked and, according to professional and academic observers, has played a key role in exacerbating London’s recent crime wave, is its gentrifying property market.

Areas of London that have higher levels of deprivation also tend to have higher crime rates.........The level of violence you see is getting much more extreme......Gentrification has had a significant impact on the area....“One of the issues young people have in Hackney Wick is the lack of aspiration, the lack of hope,” says Allen. “They’re all living in a rich, diverse city, but it still feels very separate to them. It’s not their development; it’s somebody else’s. They think they won’t be able to live in the area they were brought up in because they’re not going to be able to spend £600,000 on an apartment.”.........gentrification has not only affected gang recruitment..... it has fundamentally altered how some gangs operate.........“It changed their idea of territory, since some senior members were forced out of the area [by the redevelopment] and had to commute in, for want of a better term,” he says. “Ten years ago there was a very strong connection to territory. There was an emotional connection. But the redevelopment changed that. The only territory that was left was the market place — the drugs market place — and that needs to be protected.”

It’s the protection of that market — one both lucrative and highly nebulous — that is behind some of the increase in violent crime. Without the clear boundaries an estate or a postcode might provide, he says, and with the high value of the drugs trade upping the stakes, transgressions are met with more intense violence.....The reasons behind the dramatic decline in New York’s murder count are much argued over: the growing economy, the end of the crack epidemic have all been put up as possible causes. Yet improvements to policing brought in under former New York police commissioner Bill Bratton cannot be overlooked.

Bratton’s policies, which included clampdowns on various low-level offences, and an increase in stop-question-and-frisk, are often mischaracterised as a zero-tolerance approach to policing, he says.

“What he really did was a management innovation.” Bratton, who was in the office 1994-96 and returned in 2014-16, introduced CompStat, measures that used computer programs to map where and when crimes were taking place, and how police resources were being shared. “When [Bratton] took over, the largest number of cops were on the day shift, but the largest number of crimes took place on the evening shift and the night shift,” he says. Bratton reallocated officers accordingly. They had a slogan: “Put cops on the dots”.......the most important thing Bratton did, Kleiman says, was make management more accountable, hauling in three precinct captains each week to grill them on their CompStat data. During his first year as commissioner, Bratton replaced something like two-thirds of the city’s 76 precinct commanders......The problem with fear is that it’s an unhelpful response. Fear raises money for private security firms, not community programmes; it improves funding to free schools, not failing academies; it promotes only the most brutal, careless forms of policing. In communities that are undergoing gentrification, fear further divides the haves and the have-nots: decreasing the kinds of relationships that might aid social mobility and better connect disadvantaged youth with the city they live in.

And what gets forgotten, says Allen, is that fear goes both ways. “A lot of the young people that get caught up in youth violence are caught up because they’re vulnerable and they’re frightened,”
accountability  Bill_Bratton  budget_cuts  carding  causality  CompStat  criminality  criminal_justice_system  data  deprivations  disaffection  fear  gentrification  homicides  killings  London  New_York_City  NYPD  organized_crime  policing  property_markets  redevelopments  United_Kingdom  violent_crime  youth 
july 2018 by jerryking
Black Lives, White Lies and Emmett Till - The New York Times
By THE EDITORIAL BOARDFEB. 6, 2017
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cold_cases  Jim_Crow  history  white_supremacy  killings  civil_rights  bigotry  Emmett_Till  the_South  FBI  lying  lynchings 
february 2017 by jerryking
The Horror of Lynchings Lives On - The New York Times
By THE EDITORIAL BOARDDEC. 3, 2016
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lynchings  the_South  cold_cases  Jim_Crow  history  killings  civil_rights  bigotry 
december 2016 by jerryking
The Death of Soul’s King: remembering Sam Cooke 50 years after his death - WSJ
By MARC MYERS
Dec. 9, 2014

What has survived are Cooke’s hits, including “You Send Me,” “Cupid” and “Another Saturday Night.” All remain relevant and continue to be covered by contemporary artists. Overlooked, however, are two of Cooke’s other big achievements: In the late 1950s and early ’60s, the singer-songwriter pioneered romantic soul and created a formula for success that helped Motown and other black-owned labels cross over to the pop charts with original music.

In the late 1950s, Cooke was the first black singer-songwriter to figure out how to parlay male vulnerability into sweet pleas that resonated with integrated teen audiences.
soul  killings  anniversaries  '60s  '50s  singers  music_labels  songwriters  African-Americans  Sam_Cooke  music  Motown  black-owned 
december 2014 by jerryking
A murder that changed Toronto
Oct. 12 2013 | The Globe and Mail | by GAYLE MacDONALD.
Toronto's loss of innocence....Anthony De Sa's new novel, Kicking The Sky, revolves around the murder of 12-year-old Emanuel Jaques and its impact on Toronto's Portuguese community, the city at large and three young boys who decide to search for Emanuel’s body. It is a coming-of-age story about hard truths and loss of innocence.
killings  Toronto  ethnic_communities  '70s  writers  neighbourhoods  Portuguese  coming-of-age  hard_truths 
october 2013 by jerryking
The gathering storm
Jun 18, 2013 | Trinidad Express Newspaper | By Rolph Balgobin.

A darker and more invidious force is also developing in our society bizarrely masked by these surface ripples of discontent. It is a counterculture, which has a vastly different value system to the mainstream. This phenomenon has been treated as a social issue—in fact it is rapidly morphing into a challenge for the economic, political and security systems in our society as well.

There are large and growing parts of this country where the law does not rule. Where the police cannot go, except in force. Being there is like being in another dimension. Time slows, and values are extremely different to the rest of the society. We work for what we have, they take what they want. We take the long view, they think short term. We hope to die old, they are prepared to die young. We value dedication, they value least effort. We contemplate, they proliferate—more young men to kill tomorrow.

This has gone from a criminal fringe to a full culture, which is rising up and challenging the law-abiding society. This is a monster, and it intends to destroy our democracy. The media only reports the murders—it misses the causes.

Our sociologists have only imperfectly described, far less explained, the very serious nature of what is before us. And so the challenge continues to grow while we use race and ethnicity to explain little black boys killing each other. This is a misdiagnosis.
op-ed  Caribbean  thug_code  dysfunction  killings  violence  values  Trinidad_&_Tobago  men  masculinity  Afro-Guyanese  Afro-Caribbeans  sociologists  race  root_cause  ethnicity  counterculture  lawlessness  cultural_values  value_systems 
july 2013 by jerryking
We can’t keep tiptoeing around black-on-black violence - The Globe and Mail
Feb. 20 2013 | The Globe and Mail | MARCUS GEE

Pockets of the city where unemployment and dropout rates are high, where many sons grow up without a father, where gangs and guns are all around, have become dangerous traps for what social workers call at-risk youth. More often than not, they turn on each other. Black-on-black violence is a disfiguring stain on the face of the city’s multicultural success. It is an uncomfortable truth that, as a welcoming and liberal city, we prefer to ignore. The political class won’t talk about it for fear of being labelled racist. The media are almost as cowed.
Toronto  Marcus_Gee  African_Canadians  killings  violence  silence 
february 2013 by jerryking
Murder Spike Poses Quandary - WSJ.com
May 6, 2008 | WSJ | By GARY FIELDS.

Murder Spike Poses Quandary
Criminologists Offer Varied Explanations For April's Increase in Some Cities

What is most troubling to people who study crime is that there is no simple explanation for this rise. There are the usual reasons -- the economy, poverty, gangs and crews, and the availability of firearms, but there is one that has been little explored: the migration of the prison culture back to the streets. As nearly 700,000 convicts a year return home, some may be bringing prison culture with them.

"This is part of the price we're paying for 20 years of mass incarceration,"...violence also turns on a central currency within prisons: respect. Disrespect can lead to lethal responses at the slightest provocation....while the overall murder rate has dropped for years, it has been inching up in the black community in recent years. African-Americans make up only 13% of the nation's population, but more are killed in the U.S. than any other racial group, accounting for 49% of all murder victims, according to Federal Bureau of Investigation statistics...."The homicides occur in neighborhoods where folks don't finish high school," Mr. Owens said. "If you can't make the transition from learning to read to reading to learn, you're done."
killings  criminality  African-Americans  violence  incarceration  mass_incarceration  disrespect  prisons  murders 
february 2013 by jerryking
Race is the elephant in the room
Nov. 22 2005 | G&M | MARGARET WENTE

Toronto schools are also taking it in the neck for racial profiling. That's because young black males make up a disproportionate number of the students who are penalized for discipline and behaviour problems. Anyone with the slightest experience in Toronto's schools knows these problems are real. But saying so is not an option. Instead, the school board has promised the Ontario Human Rights Commission that the schools will be more sensitive. From now on, principals must consider "mitigating factors" before they impose discipline. One such factor is "racial harassment." Next fall, schools will begin to gather race-based discipline statistics in order to detect bias. Want to guess what's going to happen?
race  Toronto  Margaret_Wente  killings  African_Canadians  schools  students  youth  disproportionality 
august 2012 by jerryking
carnage and culture: Jason Whitlock: Taylor's death a grim reminder for us all
November 30, 2007 | FOXSports.com | Jason Whitlock.
HBO did a fascinating documentary on Little Rock Central High School, the Arkansas school that required the National Guard so that nine black kids could attend in the 1950s. Fifty years later, the school is one of the nation's best in terms of funding and educational opportunities. It's 60 percent black and located in a poor black community.

Watch the documentary and ask yourself why nine poor kids in the '50s risked their lives to get a good education and a thousand poor black kids today ignore the opportunity that is served to them on a platter.

Blame drugs, blame Ronald Reagan, blame George Bush, blame it on the rain or whatever. There's only one group of people who can change the rotten, anti-education, pro-violence culture our kids have adopted. We have to do it.

The "keepin' it real" mantra of hip hop is in direct defiance to evolution. There's always someone ready to tell you you're selling out if you move away from the immature and dangerous activities you used to do, you're selling out if you speak proper English, embrace education, dress like a grown man, do anything mainstream.

The Black KKK is enforcing the same crippling standards as its parent organization. It wants to keep black men in their place — uneducated, outside the mainstream and six feet deep.
NFL  self-help  hip_hop  killings  violence  African-Americans  thug_code  dysfunction  documentaries  HBO  immaturity  integration  students  '50s  education  civil_rights  high_schools 
august 2012 by jerryking
In two killings, a tale of the new information order -
Jun. 06 2012 | The Globe and Mail | Simon Houpt.

The news about two murders - the shooting last Saturday evening at Toronto’s Eaton Centre and the case of the so-called Canadian cannibal - offers a penetrating snapshot of how we now consume information. Both stories emerged first in social media and were then picked up by establishment outlets, which were forced to keep pace with the adrenalin rush of Twitter and other online channels while also pushing the stories forward.

And the news accounts that emerged of the two killings carry lessons about the challenges of doing the heavy lifting of actual reporting while simultaneously trying to conduct a conversation.
Simon_Houpt  social_media  killings  Toronto 
june 2012 by jerryking
The death of the Code of Thug Life - The Globe and Mail
Michael C. Chettleburgh

The Globe and Mail

Published Monday, Jun. 04 2012,
thug_code  toronto  criminality  killings 
june 2012 by jerryking
The Trayvon Martin Tragedies - WSJ.com
March 27, 2012,| WSJ |By JUAN WILLIAMS.

The Trayvon Martin Tragedies
The recent killing of Trayvon Martin needs more investigation. But where's the outrage over the daily scourge of black-on-black crime?
Trayvon_Martin  killings  African-Americans 
march 2012 by jerryking
A shattered father speaks | Toronto & GTA | News | Toronto Sun
By Terry Davidson ,Toronto Sun

First posted: Saturday, January 14, 2012 07:47 PM EST | Updated: Saturday, January 14, 2012 07:56 PM ES
killings 
january 2012 by jerryking
A Shattered Father Speaks
January 14, 2012 | Toronto SUN | Terry Davidson
killings 
january 2012 by jerryking
Streets still safe for most people: Four gunfire victims 'known to police,'
three had records; [Toronto Edition]
Christie Blatchford. National Post. Oct 30, 2002. pg. A.17.FR
Christie_Blatchford  ProQuest  Toronto  killings  violence 
november 2011 by jerryking
SOMETIMES RACE IS SIMPLY A FACTOR
October 31, 2002 | National Post | Christie Blatchford

As the Star study also apparently revealed, black people represent almost 27% of all violence charges such as homicides, sex assaults and gun-related offences -- a percentage way out of whack in a city where, according to the most recent census figures, only 8.1% of Torontonians described themselves as black.

(Interestingly, the headline on this story, which read ''Black crime rates highest,'' was corrected the next day, lest anyone got the wrong impression: It was true, the correction said, that black Torontonians accounted for the highest amount of violent crime, but that did not mean they have the highest crime rate, ''which the Star's analysis of Toronto police data did not measure.'' Huh?)
Christie_Blatchford  statistics  Julian_Fantino  murders  Toronto  race  criminality  killings  political_correctness  silence  demographic_changes  African_Canadians  overrepresentation  Toronto_Police_Service  criminal_justice_system  violent_crime 
november 2011 by jerryking
Jamaicans mourn child slain at party
Nov 18, 2002 |The Globe and Mail. pg. A.14 | Colin Freeze.
ProQuest  killings  violence  Jamaica  Colin_Freeze  silence 
november 2011 by jerryking
Save Jamaica's sons
Nov 18, 2002 | The Globe and Mail pg. A.19 | Trudy Simpson.
ProQuest  Jamaica  killings  violence  youth  Toronto 
november 2011 by jerryking
The need for fathers
Nov 29, 2005| The Globe and Mail pg. A.20 | Carol Richards-Sauer.

Your editorial rightly claims we need to admit that the absence of black fathers contributes to social alienation and violent behaviour among some of their sons. The silence that you decry, however, is not universal.

Recently, I have participated in a town-hall meeting and been in the audience at a round-table discussion about gun violence.

Each time, at least one brave black person from the audience spoke about the issue. Each time, their comments sparked little discussion or self-evaluation.

The topic is rarely addressed because too many community leaders, often self-appointed, have become too focused on blaming forces from without that we can't control as primary or sole causes of black disenfranchisement.

We need to recognize also those forces from within that we can control. We need to characterize ourselves not just as people to whom bad things are done (racism, police brutality, school suspensions etc.) but also as people who make choices that sometimes lead to bad results.

This is necessary to make any true change and to win helpful alliances
ProQuest  fatherhood  family  dysfunction  African_Canadians  disenfranchisement  silence  individual_choice  autonomy  violence  killings  family_breakdown  systemic_discrimination  systemic_racism  beyond_one's_control 
november 2011 by jerryking
The many fatherless boys in black families
Nov 26, 2005 | The Globe and Mail. pg. A.26 | Editorials

...Yet as politicians at all three levels and black community leaders scramble for answers to the anarchy, no one has dared talk about the crisis of fatherlessness in the black community.

The silence is inexcusable. Growing up without a father present is now the norm for many black children in Canada, particularly those of Jamaican ancestry. Nearly half of all black children under 14 in Canada have just one parent in the home, compared to slightly under one in five of Canadian children as a whole, census figures from 2001 show. Two in three Jamaican-Canadian children in Toronto are being raised by a single parent...."without strong, self-sacrificing, frugal and industrious fathers as role models, our boys go astray, never learn how to be parents (or men), and perpetuate the dismal situation of single-parent homes run by tired and overworked black women. The black family as a survival unit fails, which leads to the ever-fragile community collapsing along with it."

Poor neighbourhoods in Toronto are crying out for involved fathers. The city's deputy police chief, Keith Forde, who is black, says that invariably when he speaks to predominantly black audiences, two or three mothers approach him to be a Big Brother to their sons. "Nothing hurtsme more in all I do in policing than hav-ing to say no to these parents."

Girls' lives, too, are deeply harmed in fatherless communities. At least a decade ago, Mr. Forde heard from 13- and 14-year-old girls in Rexdale, a dangerous suburb of Toronto, that the boys were insisting: "If you want to be my girlfriend you have to get pregnant for me."...The "survival unit," the black family, is being fatally weakened by the lack of fathers. No matter how helpful social programs, additional police or tougher gun laws may be, they are not the heart of the problem. Reuniting fathers and children should be the top priority. Where are the black fathers, and where are all those who should be calling them to their duty?
African_Canadians  dysfunction  family  silence  JCA  editorials  Toronto  fatherhood  killings  thug_code  family_breakdown  statistics  role_models  Jamaican  violence  say_"no"  Fifty-Cent  parenting 
november 2011 by jerryking
The wall of silence in Toronto's killings
The Globe and Mail. Toronto, Ont.: Nov 22, 2005. pg. A.22

Young black people tempted to adopt the urban gangster culture in Toronto now know they can kill with impunity. Canada's biggest city is in a full-fledged crisis of violence, and at the heart of it is a wall of silence in parts of the black community that protects killers.

On Friday, one of the most shocking killings in the city's history occurred. An 18-year-old man was shot dead on the steps of a church during the funeral of his 17-year-old best friend. This killing may be unprecedented in North America, says Police Chief Bill Blair, who has discussed it with the heads of several U.S. police departments. Even in Jamaica, which has a murder rate nearly 40 times as high as Toronto's, funerals are apparently off-limits.
ProQuest  killings  silence  African_Canadians  thug_code  Toronto  impunity  Bill_Blair 
november 2011 by jerryking
Separating races is not the answer
Oct 12, 2005 |The Globe and Mail. pg. A.22 |

...And why does it want this? Because black youths are shooting one another in the street. Ergo, says the coalition, society is failing black people. The school system, the justice system and the police are failing them. Even multiculturalism is failing them, because it presupposes an open society of equals rather than the real world in which blacks face racism and discrimination. Multiculturalism "doesn't allow us to focus on communities that are in crisis and need a targeted approach," Margaret Parsons, the executive director of the African Canadian Legal Clinic, told a Toronto newspaper. "It does not address racism."

This is quite stunning. Agencies that have been sitting on the sidelines for years have decided within two months that they have the answer. When community activist Dudley Laws declared in the summer of 2001 that at least 94 black youths had been killed by other black youths since 1996, the silence from black community groups was deafening. Now those groups wish to pick up their ball and bat and go home.

Segregating people by race, voluntary or otherwise, is not a solution. It compounds the problems of poverty, exclusion and related pathologies, including rampant fatherlessness and its flip side, out-of-control youth. Creating separate offices and separate schools, and tearing down behavioural codes that apply to everyone, will send a destructive message to everyone: that people do not have to live together, that separate is not so bad as long as it is equal.
ProQuest  in_the_real_world  segregation  African_Canadians  violence  killings  silence  editorials  dysfunction  fatherhood  family_breakdown 
november 2011 by jerryking
The cost of silence
Catherine Sinclair. The Globe and Mail. Toronto, Ont.: Nov 23, 2005. pg. A.18
silence  Toronto  African_Canadians  ProQuest  letters_to_the_editor  killings  deaths  racism  murders 
november 2011 by jerryking
The cost of silence
David Gladstone. The Globe and Mail. Toronto, Ont.: Nov 23, 2005. pg. A.18

For 25 years, I was a principal in the inner city of Toronto and, over all those years, one fact became very clear: Black mothers would not let their children be blamed by a white male authority figure without challenging that authority. A black mother would almost never admit that her child might have been in error in his or her behaviour.

However, I slowly began to understand why. There was no one else around to protect the black mother's child and it made no difference what the child did, the mother was not going to side with white authority against her child. Even when I used black teachers to discuss the issue with the mother, nothing changed.
ProQuest  letters_to_the_editor  African_Canadians  silence  teachers  criminality  murders  killings  deaths 
november 2011 by jerryking
Even in the city, it takes a village to raise a child space space
November 29, 2005 | The Globe and Mail – Page A21 | By WILLIAM THORSELL

It was wonderful last week to hear a pastor at another Toronto funeral for a young murdered black man demand that dysfunctional families and communities accept responsibility themselves for the trauma. Stop laying most of the blame on others, he said; face the fact that much of the pathology comes from within the home. The mourners in the church applauded. Many people who might try to help these troubled communities defer, waiting for the communities themselves to speak honestly about their own condition. At the core, it is a matter of values
William_Thorsell  Toronto  African_Canadians  funerals  murders  silence  killings  deaths  dysfunction  poverty  family_breakdown  values  face_the_facts 
november 2011 by jerryking

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