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Dancing with Disruption - Mike Lipkin
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By Mike Lipkin
#1. Become someone who knows.....a secret is a formula or knowledge that is only known to a few. If you own a secret, you have the power to share it so you can turn the few into the many. Secrets are everywhere – hiding in plain sight. The difference between someone who knows and someone who doesn’t is the willingness to do the work, find the information, talk to the people and formulate one’s strategy. Be a source of joy and not a source of stress!! Disruption begins long before.....Mastering other people's emotions....Add in a way that thrills and delights others!! Prospective of Personal Mastery....industry connection + internal influence.
# 2. Have an audacious ambition. If you want to be a disruptor, you can be humble, but you can’t be modest. You have to dream big....dream bigger than anything that gets in its way.
#3. Be simultaneously analytical and creative. There may be a gap in the market, but is there a market in the gap? ...Disruption demands left and right brain firing together. Your intuition may alert you to the opportunity but it’s your intellect that builds your business case. That’s why you need wingmen or women to complement your capacity. Fly social not solo.
#4. Be prolific. The more you lose, the more you win. 1.0 is always imperfect. You will hear the word “no” hundreds of times more than the word “yes.” The best way to get ready is to do things before you’re ready. The best you can do is get it as right as you can the first time [i.e. "good enough"] and then get better, stronger, smarter. Disruptors try a lot more things than disruptees. They fail fast and they fail forward. [Practice: repeated performance or systematic exercise for the purpose of acquiring skill or proficiency.
#5. Communicate like magic. If you want to be a disruptor, you must be a great communicator. ... the right words generate oxytocin – the love hormone, whereas the wrong words generate cortisol, the stress hormone. .... tell your story in a way that opens people’s hearts, minds and wallets to you. Create a vocabulary.
#6. Be a talent magnet. Disruption demands the boldest and brightest partners....The best talent goes where it earns the highest return. Reputation is everything. [What would Mandela do?]
#7. Play like a champion today. Disruptors may not always play at their best but they play their best every day. They bring their A-Game no matter who they’re playing....you feel their intensity and passion. How hard are you hustling on any given day? Everything matters. There is no such thing as small. They’re all in, all the time.
disruption  personal_branding  uncertainty  hard_work  Pablo_Picasso  creativity  intuition  intensity  passions  talent  failure  partnerships  reputation  Communicating_&_Connecting  storytelling  thinking_big  expertise  inequality_of_information  knowledge_intensive  imperfections  audacity  special_sauce  prolificacy  affirmations  unshared_information  good_enough  pairs  Mike_Lipkin  CAIF 
april 2017 by jerryking
"The bruises of the bandwagon: ENTREPRENEURSHIP: Reality television is revealing how desperately some people want to break into business. But many fail to analyse their ideas,
Apr. 25, 2005 | Financial Times pg 16.| by Paul Tyrrell

Everyone wants to run their own business. But many fail to prepare thoroughly before scrambling on to the bandwagon. Among the television hopefuls, the most widespread and humiliating trait is a failure to appreciate that an entrepreneur's personal qualities are just as important as their ideas.

It is a salutary warning. Venture capitalists and business angels have always been more inclined to back a great team with a mediocre idea than a mediocre team with a great idea. They attach a lot of importance to what they term "scar tissue" - evidence that the person has learned from experience.

"People who are enamoured of their own idea can be great, but only if they listen really hard,"... "Nothing goes to plan, so you're looking for people you can trust off-plan." ...Entrepreneurs are more likely to succeed if they can come up with an idea that exploits their experience. This is particularly clear in product development situations - for example, where an engineer takes the knowledge he gains at a large company and uses it to set up a rival.

Research suggests that "spin-outs have a survival edge in the market over other entrants as the result of a combination of entrepreneurial flexibility and inherited knowledge"....what distinguishes successful entrepreneurs is their ability to spot commercially exploitable patterns where others cannot. Herbert Simon, winner of the 1978 Nobel Prize in economic sciences, suggests this process is intuitive: a good business idea stems from the creative linking, or cross-association of two or more in-depth "chunks" of experience - know-how and contacts.
Infotrac_Newsstand  entrepreneurship  entrepreneur  pattern_recognition  personality_types/traits  television  spin-offs  entertainment  venture_capital  angels  cross-pollination  tacit_data  knowledge_intensive  scar_tissue  teams  team_risk  off-plan  Plan_B  tacit_knowledge  nimbleness  combinations 
november 2011 by jerryking
The Path to Growth - WSJ.com
MARCH 3, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | By NORMAN T. SHEEHAN
& GANESH VAIDYANATHAN. Even the most successful business models
erode over time making adaptability the key to thriving under tough
conditions. To avoid getting stuck in a rut, companies must constantly
adapt business models to threats and opportunities. While most managers
consider a host of conventional approaches, there's another way to
approach the problem: Look at value-creation strategies. Here are three
such strategies:
* Industrial efficiency, which creates value by producing
standardized offerings at low cost. Manufacturers and fast-food
restaurants rely on this approach.
* Network services, which creates value by connecting clients to
other people or other parts of the network. Telcos, delivery services
and Internet middlemen such as eBay use this method.
* Knowledge intensive, which creates value by applying customized
expertise to clients' problems. Law firms and medical practices are
prime examples.
business_models  delivery_networks  eBay  efficiencies  expertise  growth  industrial-strength  inequality_of_information  industry_expertise  knowledge_intensive  law_firms  legal  low-cost  middlemen  networks  orchestration  strategies  taxonomy  value_creation 
february 2010 by jerryking
The Digitalization of the World - Adam Smith, Esq.
11 January, 2010 | Adam Smith, Esq. | post by Bruce MacEwen.
"Education, as a role for us, should I hope be obvious. We educate our
clients, " and "We don't just rent this knowledge out to our clients, we
should impart it so it becomes their own.
Financial/medical advisers are people to whom we entrust (one hopes) our
every secret, hope, and fear. We should serve the same function. ... We
should be able to provide them with various roadmap's, decision trees,
alternative ways of pursuing their objectives, with lesser and greater
ratios of return and reward. Hands-on personal care? Yes, because there
is no substitute for being there. The more amazing technology and
collaboration-at-a-distance becomes (what the Web, ultimately, is all
about), the more important face to face personal meetings are. The more
people you know "virtually," the more you want to meet them in person."
Bruce_MacEwen  JCK  client_management  inequality_of_information  trustworthiness  knowledge_intensive  management_consulting  indispensable  professional_education  digital_life  teaching  decision_trees  ratios  roadmaps  risk-assessment  strategic_thinking  risks  face2face  personal_meetings  personal_touch  generating_strategic_options  client_development  expertise  digitalization 
january 2010 by jerryking

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