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jerryking : labour   11

Today’s Titans Can Learn From Fall of U.S. Steel - NYTimes.com
JULY 3, 2014 | NYT |By FLOYD NORRIS.

it was the run-up to that strike, as well as the eventual terms of the settlement, that paved the way for the decline of the company and the industry it led. The episode opened the door for surging imports and eventually for wage increases that the companies could ill afford...The United States economy is no longer so dependent on heavy manufacturing, a development that would have taken place even if the men running U.S. Steel had far more foresight than they did. But they might have coped with it far better than they did. They might have found a way to better use newer technology that enabled companies like Nucor, which remains in the S.&P. 500 and whose market value is four times that of U.S. Steel, to prosper making steel.

More broadly, the descent of U.S. Steel from all powerful to also-ran might be worth contemplating by those who now seem to be astride the world economy, a list that could include companies in Wall Street, Silicon Valley and China.

Michelle Applebaum, a now-retired steel analyst whom I have relied upon for insights since the 1980s, when she was at Salomon Brothers, says that one reason the 1959 strike proved disastrous for the big steel companies was that it showed customers they had choices...When the strike did end, workers received minimal wage increases, but they also obtained a cost-of-living provision to ensure that wages and benefits kept up with inflation. That would prove to be valuable for them in later years. Steel users had learned how to deal with imported steel, a lesson they did not forget.
steel  lessons_learned  '60s  unions  labour  S&P  JFK  strikes  history  Salomon_Brothers  U.S._Steel  cost-of-living  Nucor  imports  research_analysts  foresight  decline 
july 2014 by jerryking
The Workers Defense Project, a Union in Spirit - NYTimes.com
By STEVEN GREENHOUSE
Published: August 10, 2013
for Eden.
The Workers Defense Project is one of 225 worker centers nationwide aiding many of the country’s 22 million immigrant workers. The centers have sprouted up largely because labor unions have not organized in many fields where immigrants have gravitated, like restaurants, landscaping and driving taxis. And there is another reason: many immigrants feel that unions are hostile to them. Some union members say that immigrants, who are often willing to work for lower wages, are stealing their jobs. ....Worker centers, which are among the most vigorous champions of overhauling immigration laws, coalesce around issues or industries....With labor unions losing members and influence, these centers are increasingly seen as an important alternative form of workplace advocacy, although no one expects them to be nearly as effective as unions in winning raises, pensions or paid vacations....“Worker centers are part of the broad scramble of how to improve things for workers outside the traditional union/collective bargaining context. They’ve become little laboratories of experimentation.”
labor  labour  unions  immigrants  workplaces  construction 
august 2013 by jerryking
The Hidden Job Crisis for American Men -
April 7, 2011 BusinessWeek By Peter Coy. Men are
disappearing from the workplace in ways that don't always register on
the official unemployment rate
unemployment  labour  race  Freshbooks  workforce_planning  statistics  crisis  hidden  joblessness 
april 2011 by jerryking
DeMaurice Smith Takes On the N.F.L. Owners - NYTimes.com
By SRIDHAR PAPPU
January 22, 2011

As a corporate lawyer at Patton Boggs, the high-powered Washington firm,
Mr. Smith dealt with companies that were either “in crisis or were
about to be.” As a candidate for the N.F.L.P.A. job, he composed what he
called “Playbook: An Enterprise Philosophy to Maximize the Business and
Political Interest of the N.F.L.P.A.” “About 60 percent of it,” he
said, “was envisioning what the chances were of a lockout and what to do
to prepare for it.”

It was a useful exercise. “The only bad thing is that everything we
thought and contemplated the league would do they’ve done,” Mr. Smith
said.
anticipating  creating_valuable_content  crisis_management  enterprise_clients  event-driven  labour  lawyers  negotiations  NFL  playbooks  preparation  sports  troubleshooting  turnarounds  unions 
january 2011 by jerryking
UNEASY ENGAGEMENT: China’s Export of Labor Faces Scorn
China, famous for its export of cheap goods, is increasingly
known for shipping out cheap labor. These global migrants often work in
factories or on Chinese-run construction and engineering projects,
though the range of jobs is astonishing: from planting flowers in the
Netherlands to doing secretarial tasks in Singapore to herding cows in
Mongolia — even delivering newspapers in the Middle East.

But a backlash against them has grown. Across Asia and Africa, episodes
of protest and violence against Chinese workers have flared. Vietnam and
India are among the nations that have moved to impose new labor rules
for foreign companies and restrict the number of Chinese workers allowed
to enter, straining relations with Beijing.
globalization  China  labour  business  Vietnam  Africa  migrants  backlash  Chinese 
december 2009 by jerryking
An Interview with AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka - WSJ.com
* SEPTEMBER 19, 2009

What Labor Wants
The AFL-CIO's new president on card check, health reform and the challenges facing the union movement.

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By MATTHEW KAMINSKI
labour  unions 
september 2009 by jerryking

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