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jerryking : landscapes   11

The Meadoway: 16 km stretch of urban park will connect downtown to Scarborough | CBC News
Posted: Apr 11, 2018 | CBC News | by Ramna Shahzad.

The park will connect 4 ravines, 15 parks and 34 neighbourhoods.

A 16-kilometre long stretch of land slated to be transformed into a large urban park called The Meadoway is "a bold vision," Mayor John Tory said on Wednesday.

The park, which will stretch north from the Don River Ravine in downtown Toronto all the way to Rouge National Urban Park in Scarborough, will allow pedestrians and cyclists to travel the entire length without ever leaving the park. .......The city is working with the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) and the W. Garfield Weston Foundation to transform a barren power corridor into the green space over the next seven years.

The entire project is expected to cost around $85 million. The W. Garfield Weston Foundation has pledged a total of $25 million to support it over the coming months.

"[The park] serves as another example of what can be accomplished when we work together with public, private and philanthropic partners,"
bicycles  cycling  Don_River  habitats  landscapes  linearity  Meadoway  neighbourhoods  outdoors  parks  philanthropy  public_spaces  ravines  Rouge_Park  Scarborough  Toronto  TRCA  urban  wilderness  green_spaces 
july 2019 by jerryking
The Scarborough Bluffs are rarely seen — but there’s a plan to change that - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May 13, 2016

[ M. Jane Fairburn in her 2013 book Along the Shore, a history of Toronto's waterfront]

Conservation officials hope to change all that, making the Bluffs safer and easier to visit. They want to shore up dangerous bits, put in more trails and create habitat for wild animals and fish. A study is already under way, with a first set of options to be presented to the public next month.

It is an exciting project, a once-in-a-century chance to open up the whole of the Scarborough shore to a broader public. It is also a delicate one. Officials face the challenge of giving safe access to the Bluffs without destroying the wild quality that lend them their magic. Some people want them left alone altogether. Others want to see a continuous shoreline trail as you might have in an urban waterfront.
Toronto  Marcus_Gee  Scarborough  history  parks  waterfronts  landmarks  landscapes  ravines  conservation  habitats  wilderness  books  TRCA 
may 2016 by jerryking
A superpark hides in Toronto’s Don Valley, waiting to be discovered - The Globe and Mail
ALEX BOZIKOVIC
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Apr. 15, 2016

historian Jennifer L. Bonnell wrote in her 2014 book Reclaiming the Don.

A few small moves would get it in motion. Proponents envision new bike lanes on Bayview Avenue that would make it less terrifying to go there on two wheels. An old rail trestle would become a pedestrian bridge. New bridges, stairs and paths would welcome people from Cabbagetown and from Regent Park, from Corktown and the emerging neighbourhoods in and around the Port Lands.

But in the longer term, the plan would mean combining two rail corridors, both controlled by Metrolinx, reconfiguring the DVP ramp to Bloor-Bayview and removing a city works yard that now sits in the middle of the valley. But governments are budgeting at least $1-billion for roads, water, parks and rail improvements in this zone, including the electrification of GO’s train lines and the Gardiner Expressway rebuild. The river is unruly, prone to powerful floods; a thoughtful, coherent landscape would mitigate the risks for infrastructure and serve the environment of the valley.
books  Brickworks  Cabbagetown  Corktown  design  Don_River  DVP  Evergreen  floodplains  floods  Gardiner_Expressway  GO  green_spaces  history  landscapes  Metrolinx  neighbourhoods  parks  Port_Lands  railways  ravines  regeneration  Regent_Park  small_moves  sustainability  Toronto  undervalued 
april 2016 by jerryking
$25-million project reimagines area under Gardiner with paths, cultural spaces - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 16, 2015| The Globe and Mail | ALEX BOZIKOVIC.

This move, to make a beautiful place out of unused infrastructure, reflects the role of landscape architects in today’s cities. “We realize we’re not going to find new public realm in the conventional places,” Mr. Ryan said. “There are no more Central Parks to be built.”

Instead, the big projects involve reclaiming leftover industrial land or infrastructure – “while the glacier of industry recedes from the downtown,” as Mr. Greenberg said.....The construction and the operation of Under Gardiner reflects an unusual partnership. Built by the public agency Waterfront Toronto and owned by the city, the project will be funded with $25-million from local philanthropists Judy and Wil Matthews. They, and the city, are studying whether the space could be run by a park conservancy, a not-for-profit institution that would work in tandem with the city.....“This area is the new frontier on which the city is growing,” Mr. Greenberg said, “just as old infrastructure becomes available for reuse and reinvention.”
parks  Toronto  public_spaces  Gardiner_Expressway  revitalization  rejuvenation  reinvention  landscapes  philanthropy 
november 2015 by jerryking
Hidden landmarks: Why Toronto is at the forefront of the landscape architecture movement - The Globe and Mail
May. 01 2015 | The Globe and Mail | ALEX BOZIKOVIC.

The history of Toronto's University Avenue: The landscape designer André Parmentier planted the avenue in 1829; it was reshaped in the 1920s in the Beaux-Arts style; and in the 1960s, the current landscape was designed by the British-born architect Howard Dunington-Grubb to cap the newly built subway. It includes perennials, statues and vent stacks.

What is clear to Mr. Birnbaum – a century and a half of design ideas – is invisible to most of us, part of the scenery. That is the plight of landscape architecture, and this is what Mr. Birnbaum’s group is hoping to change: to make familiar the idea of a “cultural landscape” as something to be seen, valued and protected by the general public. As he puts it, “We’re making visible the often-invisible hand of the landscape architect.”

What exactly is a “cultural landscape”? It can be a street or a waterfront, designed or inherited. But most often it means a designed outdoor space, the work of landscape architects who deal with urban and ecological lenses, as well as vegetation and the formal design of plazas, streets and other outdoor spaces...Waterfront Toronto: In remaking 800 hectares of the industrial waterfront, that agency has brought together some of the best landscape architects in the world to remake the topography and to set a high standard for the urban fabric it is building....Parks matter! Parks generate real-estate value and, more importantly, a sense of place. As Mr. Birnbaum points out, the waterfront parks “were built first, communicating what the quality of life will be along the waterfront. We think it sets an enviable standard, and that’s why we will be bringing people from all over the globe to see the landscapes and to discuss these issues.”
Toronto  landmarks  landscapes  architecture  design  parks  waterfronts  Waterfront_Toronto  history  public_spaces  quality_of_life 
may 2015 by jerryking
Homegrown designers plant global roots
August 25, 2011 | | RICHARD FOOT,Special to The Globe and Mail
Send to Kellie
international_marketing  globalization  landscapes  architecture 
november 2011 by jerryking
Ravines a defining aspect of Toronto - The Globe and Mail
RENATA D’ALIESIO
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Apr. 01, 2011
Toronto  landscapes  running  ravines  parks 
april 2011 by jerryking
Playing with nature
February 23, 2009 by RASHA MOURTADA.

Adam Bienenstock's, founder of Gardens For Living, goal is to bring children and nature together through the installation of natural playgrounds in urban and suburban Toronto. .....Forget plastic and iron. Natural playgrounds are constructed with fallen logs, trees and shrubs and are built into the ground itself. (A slide built into the slope of a hill, for example.) Bugs are intentionally introduced and musical instruments and art are incorporated into the landscape.

"Whereas traditional playgrounds might use 13% of the actual space in the playground, we use closer to 95%" says Mr. Bienenstock, who has 10 year-round employees and 15 seasonal workers.....Today, Gardens For Living works exclusively on natural playgrounds. Last year, that involved 60 projects, including consulting, installation and design projects, but the company is also involved in policy work and education initiatives.
business_development  Rasha_Mourtada  industries  landscapes  playgrounds 
february 2009 by jerryking

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