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jerryking : languages   38

The Language Barrier Is About to Fall - WSJ
By ALEC ROSS
Jan. 29, 2016

Universal machine translation should accelerate the world’s growing interconnectedness. While the current stage of globalization was propelled in no small part by the adoption of English as the lingua franca for business—to the point that there are now twice as many nonnative English speakers as native speakers—the next wave will open up communication even more broadly by removing the need for a shared language. Currently, when Korean-speaking businesspeople speak with Mandarin-speaking executives at a conference in Brazil, they converse in English. There will no longer be this need, opening the door of global business for nonelites and a massive number of non-English speakers.
languages  globalization  machine_learning  translations 
january 2016 by jerryking
Speaking the Language of Risk - NYTimes.com
By CARL RICHARDS MAY 11, 2015.

humans outside the financial world define risk differently. In everyday life, we tend to think of risk as uncertainty, or what is left over after we have thought of everything else.

With uncertainty comes variability within a set of unknown limits. It’s the stuff that comes out of left field, like Nassim Nicholas Taleb’s black swan events. Because we can’t measure uncertainty with any sort of accuracy, we think of risk as something outside our control. We often connect it to things like running out of money in retirement or ending up in a car crash.

But how did we end up with two such completely different definitions of the same thing? My research points to an economist named Frank Knight and his book “Risk, Uncertainty and Profit.” (Toronto Reference Library, Stack Request, 330.1 K54.11)

In 1921, Mr. Knight wrote: “There is a fundamental distinction between the reward for taking a known risk and that for assuming a risk whose value itself is not known.” When a risk is known, it is “easily converted into an effective certainty,” while “true uncertainty,” as Knight called it, is “not susceptible to measurement.”...I’m also betting that if you heard a term like “risk management model,” you really thought, “uncertainty management model.” Unfortunately, no financial firm offers uncertainty management.

Solving this problem doesn’t require a new definition. We just need to shift our thinking when we hear someone in finance mention risk. We need to remember, that person isn’t talking about the odds we’ll lose everything, but about something that fits in a box.

I suspect that is why financial professionals sound so confident when they talk about managing our risk. In their minds, managing risk comes down to a formula they can fine-tune on their Dial-A-Risk meter. In our minds, we have to learn to separate the formula from the unknown unknowns that cannot be accounted for in any model or equation.

Once we learn to recognize that we are not talking about the same thing, we can avoid terrible disappointment and bad behavior when financial risk shows up again. And it will.
risks  uncertainty  unknowns  books  interpretation  financial_risk  beyond_one's_control  Nassim_Taleb  black_swan  misinterpretations  miscommunications  disappointment  languages 
may 2015 by jerryking
From War Room to Boardroom: Leadership Lessons From Two Generals - WSJ
Dec. 8, 2014 | WSJ |

Start to build relationships so that you have something to fall back on when you disagree on the issues.

What leadership lessons should we take from the American experience in Iraq and Afghanistan?

GEN. MCCHRYSTAL: The first thing is we didn’t do due diligence before we went in. We didn’t understand the problem to the depth that we needed to. We didn’t take the time to do it, and we didn’t nurture the experts.

If we gathered all the Pashtun and Arabic speakers in the U.S. military, we could probably fit them on this stage. And yet, after World War II began, after Pearl Harbor, we trained more than 5,000 military members to speak Japanese. We just haven’t made that level of effort.

The other thing is we go at this with different parts of our government. Every agency wants to help but they want to protect their equities, and you can’t do a complex endeavor like this unless you can build a truly integrated team in which everybody is focused.
leadership  lessons_learned  shared_consciousness  operational_tempo  Stanley_McChrystal  teams  NSC  security_&_intelligence  generalship  ISIS  al_Qaeda  Taliban  learning_organizations  adaptability  decision_making  speed  languages  Arabic  Pashtun  relationships 
december 2014 by jerryking
Who Needs Amazon or Wal-Mart? China Cuts Out the Middleman - WSJ
Dec. 18, 2014 | WSJ | By DENNIS K. BERMAN.

LightInTheBox , a Beijing company listed on the New York Stock Exchange. Run by Chinese with deep experience in America, the site can shapeshift into 27 different languages, from Arabic to Bahasa to Swedish, and ship goods piecemeal all over the world.... the Chinese are selling it directly to consumers now—no Western middleman required..."we are using a lot of data. We are trying to use data to predict product trends and channel it back to the supply chain,"..The company employs customer representatives in each of the 27 languages. There aren’t a lot of Danish speakers in China, of course. So instead it employs part-time workers from all over the world, training them over the Web, and then getting them to use the Web to make calls and do email.
Wal-Mart  Amazon  China  LightInTheBox  retailers  Chinese  e-commerce  Dennis_K._Berman  disintermediation  languages  multilingual 
december 2014 by jerryking
Canada’s an Asia-Pacific country. When our schools forget this, it costs us - The Globe and Mail
David Mulroney
Canada’s an Asia-Pacific country. When our schools forget this, it costs us Add to ...
Subscribers Only

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Wednesday, Nov. 06 2013,
Asia_Pacific  Canada  David_Mulroney  education  languages 
november 2013 by jerryking
Obama and the Racial Politics of American English - NYTimes.com
By H. SAMY ALIM and GENEVA SMITHERMAN
Published: September 8, 2012

In a multiethnic, multicultural America where Hispanics are the largest ethnic minority and Asians are the fastest-growing minority, national politicians also will have to be fluent in multiple ways of speaking. For too long, sounding presidential meant sounding like a white, middle- or upper-class straight man (with modest leeway for regional accents). In 2012 and beyond, it’s going to take a lot more than that to win over the hearts and minds — and ears — of the American people....Language is playing a role in this electoral season, too, but in ways most observers have overlooked. Because language is a primary factor in shaping whether a politician is seen as “likable” or “relatable,” the stark differences in speaking styles between Mr. Obama and his Republican challenger, Mitt Romney, are probably contributing to the persistently higher marks for “personality” that Mr. Obama has gotten in numerous polls.
Obama  speeches  linguistics  Mitt_Romney  Campaign_2012  languages 
september 2012 by jerryking
Raise the reward for learning a language
Sept. 6, 2012 | The Financial Times | Michael Skapinker
Infotrac  languages 
september 2012 by jerryking
As my father used to say, ‘Adeh, maan… adeh’
September 5, 2012 | Indo Caribbean World | Bernard Heydorn.

Creole language
Guyanese  languages 
september 2012 by jerryking
Everyone Speaks Text Message - NYTimes.com
By TINA ROSENBERG
December 9, 2011

Whether a language lives or dies, says K. David Harrison, an associate professor of linguistics at Swarthmore College, is a choice made by 6-year-olds.
mobile_phones  text_messages  Africa  languages  Guinea  linguistics 
december 2011 by jerryking
The 'H' Word - WSJ.com
APRIL 12, 2007 | WSJ | By LIONEL TIGER.

The coercive trend is that ordinary African-American males earn decreasing amounts of money compared to women of their community. They are more accident-prone, more imprisoned and have frailer family lives than women do. Is this why they smoothly call them whores, out of desperate resentment at their own ineffectuality?

There are structural reasons for this beyond the craven crumminess of popular culture. When African and Arab slavers captured people for the New World, they preferred to break up families. Subsequent slave-owning policies sustained that pattern. As well, many slaves were taken from West African societies in which biological mothers and fathers didn't necessary share child caretaking but mother and her brother did. When I lived in Ghana years ago, Christian families with father and mother in the household were called "same muddah same fadduh" in the street. It's likely that continuities persist, as they certainly do in Caribbean societies.

There's also a massive contemporary reason for the invidiousness many African-American men feel in the presence of women -- their relative failure in a school system which broadly favors females. By college age, there is a sharp fall-off of male enrollment in general and of African-American men specifically.
Colleges_&_Universities  slang  basketball  women  family_breakdown  athletes_&_athletics  race  languages  profanity  misogyny  African-Americans  gender_gap  slavery  masculinity  Afro-Caribbeans  disrespect 
november 2011 by jerryking
So you drop an F-bomb in your Oscar speech. Now what? - The Globe and Mail
A word that used for shock value purposes, but it no longer
shocks anyone...it just comes across as common and desperate for
attention. If you want to really shock people - use good grammer, be
eloquent, be succinct and be brilliant. Oh, and say something we haven't
heard a million times already!
commentators  letters_to_the_editor  languages  civility  profanity 
february 2011 by jerryking
Three Global Game-Changers for the Information Industry
Dec. 2010 | EContent | Ben Sargent. Here are 3 game-changing
opportunities & challenges that product planners & mktg.managers
must engage:
1. Your future entails a hundred languages, give or take. Each year,
more of the world’s popn. goes online & become info. consumers—but
in an increasingly diverse set of languages. In this year’s update, we
detail 57 economically significant languages needed to reach consumers
& businesses in 101 countries. To successfully
move to this level of multilingual publishing, companies must develop a
process for adding groups of new languages, not one language at a
time—for instance, flipping in one product cycle from 30 languages to
60.
2. The web is a visual medium. Product & mktg. managers must
demand video as an integral part of every product or service, from
conception of the product itself all the way to promotion, sales,
support, & community.
3. Falling translation costs will disrupt the information industry.
ProQuest  languages  multilingual  translations  content  ECM  video  web_video  visualization  product_cycles  localization  game_changers  visual_culture  think_threes 
february 2011 by jerryking
Dean of Ivey's Hong Kong campus: 'Canadians are missing the boat' - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 01, 2010 | Globe & Mail | GORDON PITTS. We’re not
preparing the next generation for a time when China will be a
superpower. What are we doing to teach people about China? We still have
people calling us and saying ‘I’m going to China – what should I wear?’
In reality, Hong Kong is a sophisticated city. And when you land in
Beijing, you’re in an enormous city where people are master consumers.
And we are focusing all our attention on languages that might not be as
useful as Mandarin in the future.

It’s really about fixing young people’s attention on the fact the
economic powerhouse is not the U.S. any more. It is China and it is
India and we don’t know enough about this side of the world.
Hong_Kong  China  Ivey  Gordon_Pitts  China_rising  America_in_Decline?  superpowers  Mandarin  languages  young_people 
november 2010 by jerryking
American Dream is Changing | Nye - Gateway to Nevada's Rurals
Oct. 31, 2010 | Nye Gateway | by Fareed Zakaria. What can
you do to make yourself thrive in this new global economy? (1) Be
unique. Try to do something that is a specialized craft or art,
something that is as much art as craft, something that feels more like
artisanship than routine work, things that are custom & custom-made
still survive. (2) Go local. Do something that can’t be outsourced,
jobs involving personal face-to-face contact will never go to India. (3)
Be indispensable. Can everyone become indispensable? Well, no, but if
you learn a difficult craft and are good at it, if you can collaborate
well, synthesize well, put things together, work with others and work
well across countries and cultures, you will have a leg-up. (4) Learn a
foreign language (e.g. Spanish or Mandarin or Hindi). (5) Excel at
mathematics, able to manipulate data, algorithms, symbols, graphs,
balance sheets and all of these skills are the essential skills for a
knowledge-based economy.
Fareed_Zakaria  21st._century  ksfs  indispensable  specialization  local  languages  mathematics  organizing_data  advice  new_graduates  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  bespoke  quantitative  global_economy  digital_economy  knowledge_economy  the_American_dream  in-person  face2face  uniqueness 
october 2010 by jerryking
Are Dictionaries Obsolete in Age of Google? - WSJ.com
* SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

Are Dictionaries Becoming Obsolete?

*
By JULIA ANGWIN
languages  linguistics 
march 2010 by jerryking
Can I Put You On Hold? - Stanley Fish Blog - NYTimes.com
Stanley Fish - Think Again
November 16, 2009, 9:30 pm
Can I Put You On Hold?
languages 
november 2009 by jerryking
Waiting for XML to come of age
Oct 28, 2003 | Computer Weekly pg. 45 | Danny Bradbury
XML  Freshbooks  languages 
august 2009 by jerryking
Ten Latin Phrases You Pretend to Understand - WSJ.com
AUGUST 4, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | By Kevin Fleming
languages  Latin  offbeat  quirky  phrases 
august 2009 by jerryking
FT.com / Wealth - Language skills prove an asset
August 13 2007 22:08 | Financial Times | By Lauren Foster in
New York

In July 2007 – nearly eight months after the deal was announced – BofA
completed the acquisition and announced its business serving wealthy
clients would be called US Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth
Management.
high_net_worth  private_banking  talent_management  linguistics  languages 
april 2009 by jerryking

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