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jerryking : law   60

How a private equity boom fuelled the world’s biggest law firm
June 6, 2019 | Financial Times | James Fontanella-Khan and Sujeet Indap in New York and Barney Thompson in London.

Jeff Hammes took the helm at a Chicago-based law firm called Kirkland & Ellis in 2010, with the aim of turning it into a world-beater, few in the industry thought he stood a chance.......known as a good litigation firm in Chicago with a decent mid-market private equity practice, in the blockbuster dealmaking world, however, the firm was largely irrelevant. Nobody took them seriously on Wall Street.....Fuelled by explosive growth in private equity, aggressive poaching of talent and most of all, a business model that resembles a freewheeling investment bank, Kirkland has become the highest-grossing law firm in the world.....This rise reflects the shift in the financial world’s balance of power since the financial crisis. Investment banks, the dominant force before 2008, have been eclipsed by private equity firms, which now sit on hundreds of billions of dollars of investment funds.

Kirkland thrived by hitching itself to this dealmaking activity. The firm presents with a relentless — many say ruthless — focus on growth, a phenomenal work ethic and a desire to up-end what it sees as a lazy hierarchy. Key questions: can its winning streak can continue? Will its private equity clients continue to prosper? how will Kirkland cope if and when the private equity boom ends? And can a firm with such a hard-charging culture survive in the long run?....Robert Smith’s Vista Equity has grown to manage assets from $1bn to $46 in a decade while working with Kirkland.....To establish Kirkland as a major player, Mr Hammes turned his attention to recruitment. ....poaching proven M&A experts and targeting all areas of dealmaking.....To entice the best lawyers to join its ranks, Kirkland managed to exploit a structural rigidity in its more traditional white-shoe and magic circle rivals. A dwindling but still significant number of elite firms remunerate equity partners using a “lockstep” model......
Kirkland sought rising stars in their late thirties who were at the bottom of this ladder, stuck in the queue for the highest share of profits. Part of its pitch was money — “With compensation, we can go as high as we want,” says one partner — but the other part was an almost unprecedented level of autonomy.
Big_Law  booming  business_development  Chicago  compensation  concentration_risk  dealmakers  deal-making  eat_what_you_kill  financial_crises  growth  hard-charging  high-end  hiring  howto  hustle  Kirkland_Ellis  law  law_firms  litigation  mid-market  organizational_culture  poaching  private_equity  recruiting  Robert_Smith  superstars  talent  turnover  Vista  Wall_Street  winner-take-all  work_ethic  world-class 
june 2019 by jerryking
Big data: legal firms play ‘Moneyball’
February 6, 2019 | Financial Times | Barney Thompson.

Is the hunt for data-driven justice a gimmick or a powerful tool to give lawyers an advantage and predict court outcomes?

In Philip K Dick’s short story The Minority Report, a trio of “precogs” plugged into a machine are used to foretell all crimes so potential felons could be arrested before they were able to strike. In real life, a growing number of legal experts and computer scientists are developing tools they believe will give lawyers an edge in lawsuits and trials. 

Having made an impact in patent cases these legal analytics companies are now expanding into a broad range of areas of commercial law. This is not about replacing judges,” says Daniel Lewis, co-founder of Ravel Law, a San Francisco lawtech company that built the database of judicial behaviour. “It is about showing how they make decisions, what they find persuasive and the patterns of how they rule.” 
analytics  data_driven  judges  law  law_firms  lawtech  lawyers  Lex_Machina  massive_data_sets  Moneyball  predictive_modeling  quantitative  tools 
february 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | Playing the Long Game for the Supreme Court - The New York Times
By Linda Greenhouse
Contributing Opinion Writer

Oct. 25, 2018

Consider two news items from last week that serve to illuminate the current reality. One was the revelation that the Heritage Foundation, a deeply conservative policy shop in Washington that has partnered with the Federalist Society in providing President Trump with judicial nominees, was running a secretive training academy for ideologically vetted judicial law clerks. The foundation suspended the program after the report.

The other was the confirmation hearing the Republicans of the Senate Judiciary Committee held (the Democratic senators boycotted it) for Allison Jones Rushing, the president’s nominee for a vacancy on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. Ms. Rushing’s conservative credentials are impeccable, including ties to the Alliance Defending Freedom, a religious-right litigating organization. Ms. Rushing clerked for Justice Clarence Thomas and for Neil Gorsuch when he was a federal appeals court judge; those clerkships evidently accounted for the “incredible wealth of judicial experience” praised by one of her Judiciary Committee supporters, Senator Thom Tillis, Republican of North Carolina. She graduated from law school 11 years ago. She is 36 years old.

How do those two developments relate to each other and to the legacy of the Bork battle? Following Judge Bork’s defeat, conservatives didn’t waste time licking their wounds. They got busy building the infrastructure necessary to accomplish their thwarted goals. The Federalist Society had been founded five years earlier by a handful of law students; Robert Bork and Antonin Scalia, then a law professor, both spoke at its first symposium.

The organization offered the perfect vehicle for cultivating a new generation of young conservative lawyers to enter the pipeline, serving as law clerks by the side of growing numbers of conservative judges and — like Justice Gorsuch and Justice Brett Kavanaugh, both former Supreme Court law clerks — becoming judges themselves.
conservatism  GOP  law  political_infrastructure  Robert_Bork  U.S._Supreme_Court  talent_pipelines  long-term 
october 2018 by jerryking
The dawn of the superstar lawyer
April 9, 2018 | Financial TImes | James Fontanella-Khan, Sujeet Indap in New York and Barney Thompson in London YESTERDAY Print this page140
law_firms  Big_Law  law  lawyers  compensation  winner-take-all  superstars  eat_what_you_kill  organizational_culture 
april 2018 by jerryking
Prepare for a New Supercycle of Innovation - WSJ
By John Michaelson
May 9, 2017

Things are about to change. Consider information technology. Today’s enterprise IT systems are built on platforms dating from the 1970s to the 1990s. These systems are now horrendously expensive to operate, prone to catastrophic crashes, and unable to ensure data security. The cloud only made this worse by increasing complexity.

Corporate CEOs complain that they are unable to get the data they need. These rickety systems cannot easily accommodate data mining and artificial intelligence. Evidence of their deficiencies is seen daily. The New York Stock Exchange stops trading for hours. Yahoo acknowledges the compromise of one billion user accounts. Airline reservation systems go down repeatedly. The pain level for users is becoming intolerable.

Each decade for the past 60 years, we have seen a thousand-fold increase in world-wide processing power, bandwidth and storage. At the same time, costs have fallen by a factor of 10,000. Advances in these platforms, in themselves, do not produce innovation. But they facilitate the development and deployment of entirely new applications that take advantage of these advances. [jk: The Republican intellectual George F. Gilder taught us that we should husband resources that are scarce and costly, but can waste resources that are abundant and cheap] Amazing new applications are almost never predictable. They come from human creativity (jk: human ingenuity). That is one reason they almost never come from incumbent companies. But once barriers to innovation are lowered, new applications follow.
10x  artificial_intelligence  CEOs  creativity  cyber_security  data_mining  economic_downturn  flash_crashes  George_Gilder  Gilder's  Law  innovation  history  human_ingenuity  incumbents  IT  legacy_tech  Moore's_Law  NYSE 
may 2017 by jerryking
A.I. Is Doing Legal Work. But It Won’t Replace Lawyers, Yet. - The New York Times
By STEVE LOHR MARCH 19, 2017

An artificial intelligence technique called natural language processing has proved useful in scanning and predicting what documents will be relevant to a case, for example. Yet other lawyers’ tasks, like advising clients, writing legal briefs, negotiating and appearing in court, seem beyond the reach of computerization, for a while......Highly paid lawyers will spend their time on work on the upper rungs of the legal task ladder. Other legal services will be performed by nonlawyers — the legal equivalent of nurse practitioners — or by technology.

Corporate clients often are no longer willing to pay high hourly rates to law firms for junior lawyers to do routine work. Those tasks are already being automated and outsourced, both by the firms themselves and by outside suppliers like Axiom, Thomson Reuters, Elevate and the Big Four accounting firms.....So major law firms, sensing the long-term risk, are undertaking initiatives to understand the emerging technology and adapt and exploit it.

Dentons, a global law firm with more than 7,000 lawyers, established an innovation and venture arm, Nextlaw Labs, in 2015. Besides monitoring the latest technology, the unit has invested in seven legal technology start-ups.

“Our industry is being disrupted, and we should do some of that ourselves, not just be a victim of it,” John Fernandez, chief innovation officer of Dentons, said.....Artificial intelligence has stirred great interest, but law firms today are using it mainly in “search-and-find type tasks” in electronic discovery, due diligence and contract review,
artificial_intelligence  automation  contracts  corporate_investors  Dentons  e-discovery  IBM_Watson  law  lawtech  lawyers  legal  NLP  start_ups  Steve_Lohr  technology 
march 2017 by jerryking
After High-Profile Shootings, Blacks Seek Prosecutor Seats - The New York Times
By YAMICHE ALCINDORNOV. 5, 2016

African-American lawyers, racial justice groups and the liberal hedge fund billionaire George Soros are combining forces to try to elect more black prosecutors in response to what they see as an insufficient response by incumbent district attorneys to the killings of black people by the police.

The effort faces steep demographic and institutional obstacles that have kept the offices of elected prosecutors — those deciding whether to seek criminal charges against the officers responsible — among the whitest reserves in American politics.
African-Americans  strategic_thinking  law  lawyers  George_Soros  Benjamin_Crump  justice_system  police_shootings  elections  prosecutors  district_attorneys  race  prosecutorial_bias 
november 2016 by jerryking
Your Lawyer May Soon Ask This AI-Powered App for Legal Help | WIRED
DAVEY ALBA BUSINESS DATE OF PUBLICATION: 08.07.15.
08.07.15

ROSS Intelligence is a voice recognition app powered by IBM Watson, the machine learning service based on the company’s Jeopardy-playing cognitive system, that doles out legal assistance.

The app is yet another example of the ways machine learning is infiltrating our everyday lives. These days, it’s not just AI algorithms themselves that have improved, but the ability to deliver them across the Internet that has made so many new applications possible.....Asking Natural Questions
Ross works much like Siri. Users can ask it any question the same way a client might—for instance, “If an employee has not been meeting sales targets and has not been able to complete the essentials of their employment, can they be terminated without notice?” The system sifts through its database of legal documents and spits out an answer paired with a confidence rating. Below the answer, a user can see the source documents from which Ross has pulled the information; if the response is accurate, you can hit a “thumbs up” button to save the source. Select “thumbs down” and Ross come up with another response.
technology  law  lawtech  lawyers  law_firms  machine_learning  voice_recognition  voice_interfaces  virtual_assistants  artificial_intelligence  Siri  IBM_Watson 
june 2016 by jerryking
From terrorism to technological disruption: Leaders need to tackle risk - The Globe and Mail
DAVID ISRAELSON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016

“Not only do they have to think about and worry about economic changes and what their competitors are going to do, they now have a whole new level of political and regulatory risk,” Ms. Ecker says.

“You can’t predict in some cases how a policy maker is going to move. We’re seeing that in China now.”

At the beginning of 2016, as markets began a steep slide in China, that country’s regulators twice activated a “circuit breaker” mechanism to halt trading, only to abandon it after it appeared to make the drop in the market even worse.

The lesson is that sometimes “business practices and even business products that seem acceptable today, for whatever reason, when something happens can be considered things you shouldn’t be doing. There’s more policy unpredictability than ever before,” Ms. Ecker says.

“In an increasingly risky world, a CEO needs to be increasingly flexible and adaptable. You also need to have a team and know what the latest threat might be.”

That isn’t necessarily easy, she adds. “There’s no rule book. When I was in politics, people used to ask me what we should anticipate. I’d tell them, ‘Read science fiction books.’ ”....CEOs in today’s risky world also need people skills that may not have been necessary before, says Shaharris Beh, director of Hackernest, a Toronto-based not-for-profit group that connects worldwide tech companies.

“CEOs have always needed strong skills around rapid decision-making and failure mitigation. In today’s hypercompetitive startup business climate, leaders need two more: pivot-resilience and proleptic consensus leadership,” he says.

“Pivot-resilience is the ability to tolerate the stress of gut-wrenching risks when dramatically shifting strategy. In other words, be able to take the blame gracefully while still warranting respect among your team members.”

Proleptic consensus leadership is especially important for startups, Mr. Beh says. “It’s the ability to garner the team’s support for taking big risks by giving them the assurance of what backup plans are in place should things go sour.”

This consensus building “is how you keep support,” he adds. In a volatile economy, “people can jump ship at any time or even unintentionally sabotage things if they’re not convinced a particular course of action will work.” So you have to constantly persuade.
science_fiction  law_firms  law  risks  CEOs  risk-management  disruption  BLG  leaders  pivots  resilience  consensus  risk-taking  contingency_planning  unpredictability  political_risk  regulatory_risk  policymakers  flexibility  adaptability  anticipating  people_skills  circuit_breakers 
february 2016 by jerryking
Law Firm Imposes Ban on Hiring Ivy League Graduates - Law Blog - WSJ
Jul 15, 2015 LAWYERS & LAW FIRMS
Law Firm Imposes Ban on Hiring Ivy League Graduates
ARTICLE
COMMENTS (23)
ADAM LEITMAN BAILEY
IVY LEAGUE
4.3k 157
By JACOB GERSHMAN
law  law_schools  Ivy_League  new_graduates 
july 2015 by jerryking
How Ubernomics can transform Canada’s legal diseconomy - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL MOTALA
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jul. 10, 2015

Technologists from other industries hope Ubernomics is a generalizable business model. This month, the MaRS Discovery District launched LegalX, an industry cluster aimed at promoting local entrepreneurship, driving industry efficiency and pioneering new business models. One of its first startups is a service called LawScout. Like Uber, it offers a simple digital platform aimed at connecting small businesses with local lawyers on a fixed-rate basis. Beagle, another product launched at the event, performs rapid contract analysis using a sophisticated algorithm, while providing a platform for social media-inspired collaboration among decision-making teams....Ubernomics is not a panacea for the legal sector. Rather than disrupt it, it will transform. Big firms are here to stay if they embrace innovation. Digital technologies promise more efficient work flows and higher productivity. The shortcomings of the consensus-driven decision-making structure, exemplified by the fall of Heenan Blaikie, suggests more strategic thinking, stronger leadership and a heavier investment in R&D is needed to make legal work more efficient and cost effective......We live in an absurd legal diseconomy. There is an ever-widening gap between supply and unmet demand. Following the Ontario government's tuition deregulation in 1998, University of Toronto law led the charge, raising tuition by 320 per cent under dean Ron Daniels. Other law schools followed suit and continue to do so. This year, U of T law is unashamed to charge incoming students more than $30,000 a year. Not to be left out, the Law Society of Upper Canada recently doubled its licensing fees. The legal academy is aggravating the access to justice crisis by imposing ever-higher rents on the most vulnerable entrants to the profession. A false and parasitic empiricism has evidently burrowed itself in the minds of our country's greatest legal thinkers.

Ubernomics is not a panacea for the legal sector. Rather than disrupt it, it will transform. Big firms are here to stay if they embrace innovation. Digital technologies promise more efficient work flows and higher productivity. The shortcomings of the consensus-driven decision-making structure, exemplified by the fall of Heenan Blaikie, suggests more strategic thinking, stronger leadership and a heavier investment in R&D is needed to make legal work more efficient and cost effective.........
Businesses like fixed-cost projections. The billable-hour model introduces a lot of uncertainty into the equation. Software such as LawScout is unlikely to undermine the legal industry’s biggest players, but it signals that an economic culture shift lies ahead.
arbitrage  billing  contracts  digital_disruption  disruption  fees_&_commissions  invoicing  law  law_firms  law_schools  lawtech  legal  sharing_economy  start_ups  Uber  unmet_demand  uToronto 
july 2015 by jerryking
To support Canadian startups, offer pro bono legal clinics - The Globe and Mail
MYRA TAWFIK AND JAMES HINTON
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jun. 17, 2015
pro_bono  free  law  patents  patent_law  law_schools  start_ups  innovation 
june 2015 by jerryking
Magna Carta provides a historical anchor for our rights - The Globe and Mail
JOHN ALLEMANG
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Feb. 02 2015,

mark the 800th anniversary of the charter’s signing
Magna_Carta  law  freedom  tyrants  anniversaries  rights 
february 2015 by jerryking
Let non-lawyers own law firms: Canadian Bar Association - The Globe and Mail
JEFF GRAY - LAW REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Aug. 14 2014
law  law_firms  future  funding 
august 2014 by jerryking
Texas Firm Highlights Struggle for Black Professionals - NYTimes.com
May 27, 2013 | NYT | By NELSON D. SCHWARTZ and
MICHAEL COOPER.

Somewhat lost in the legal arguments over affirmative action are the less tangible, more subtle forces that can determine professional success, more than a dozen black lawyers here, in San Antonio and elsewhere in Texas said in interviews. Social rituals can play a big role in determining who makes it on to the partnership track in the exclusive world of white-shoe firms, and whether those partners can bring in business as rainmakers.

Gerald Roberts, an African-American lawyer who was a partner at Thompson & Knight before leaving in 2010, said that social relationships left some black lawyers at a distance from their white colleagues and potential clients. “For the most part, they don’t go to church together on Sunday enough, they don’t have dinner together enough, and they don’t play enough golf together to develop sufficiently strong relationships of trust and confidence,”
diversity  African-Americans  lawyers  law_firms  law  professional_service_firms  Texas  relationships  rituals  social_exclusion  social_barriers  cultural_signifiers 
may 2013 by jerryking
Book Review: Saving Justice - WSJ.com
April 9, 2013 | WSJ | By STEVEN G. CALABRESI.


Saving Justice

By Robert H. Bork
(Encounter, 136 pages, $23.99)
book_reviews  law  scandals  Watergate  Richard_Nixon 
may 2013 by jerryking
Winning Legally: How to Use the Law to Create Value, Marshal Resources, and Manage Risk - Harvard Business Review
Winning Legally: How to Use the Law to Create Value, Marshal Resources, and Manage Risk
by Constance E. Bagley
Source: Harvard Business Press Books
204 pages. Publication date: Dec 12, 2005. Prod. #: 192X-HBK-ENG
Write the First Review

The rash of corporate scandals in recent years underscores a fact too often ignored in the business world: flouting the law holds serious consequences. Indeed, all it takes is one rogue trader, one greedy executive, or one misinformed manager to place an entire organization at risk. But respected legal expert Constance E. Bagley argues that staying out of trouble is only part of the picture when it comes to legality in business. In Winning Legally, Bagley shows how managers can proactively harness the power of the law to maximize corporate value, marshal human and financial resources, and manage risk. Through scores of classic and contemporary examples across the business landscape, this no-nonsense guide completely reframes the relationship of law to business. Bagley explains how managers can use the law as a strategic tool to help select and work effectively with legal advisers, spot legal issues before they become problems, weigh the legal risks of specific opportunities, and more. Ultimately, the responsibility for making tough business decisions lies with managers--not with lawyers. This timely book shows how managers can combine business audacity and vision with integrity and respect for the law to build truly great and enduring firms. Constance E. Bagley is an associate professor of business administration at Harvard Business School. She was formerly a partner of Bingham McCutchen LLP and co-author of The Entrepreneur's Guide to Business Law.
books  legal_strategies  law  HBR  audacity  vision  integrity  value_creation 
february 2013 by jerryking
Tips for executive contracts
?? | Globe & Mail | Malcolm J. MacKillop

* Responsibilities & performance
* Benefits
* Perks
* Golden parachutes
* Golden handcuffs
* Arbitration clauses
*
contracts  employment_law  tips  executive_management  law  legalese 
december 2012 by jerryking
Fasken Martineau makes big move into Africa - The Globe and Mail
JEFF GRAY - Law Reporter

The Globe and Mail

Published Sunday, Oct. 21 2012
law  South_Africa  globalization  Jeff_Gray  Africa 
october 2012 by jerryking
Book review: Reading Law - WSJ.com
August 28, 2012 | WSJ | By DAVID B. RIVKIN JR..

The Triumph of the Text
In "Reading Law," Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia and legal writer Bryan A. Garner argue for paying close attention to the original meaning of the words in the Constitution and other legal documents.
book_reviews  law  U.S._Supreme_Court  constitutions 
august 2012 by jerryking
Economic Conditions-Economic trends-legal profession-lawyers-prestige-doctors - New York Times
January 6, 2008 | NYT | By ALEX WILLIAMS.

“The older professions are great, they’re wonderful,” said Richard Florida, the author of “The Rise of the Creative Class: And How It’s Transforming Work, Leisure, Community and Everyday Life” (Basic Books, 2003). “But they’ve lost their allure, their status. And it isn’t about money.”

OR at least, it is not all about money. The pay is still good (sometimes very good), and the in-laws aren’t exactly complaining. Still, something is missing, say many doctors, lawyers and career experts: the old sense of purpose, of respect, of living at the center of American society and embodying its definition of “success.”

In a culture that prizes risk and outsize reward — where professional heroes are college dropouts with billion-dollar Web sites — some doctors and lawyers feel they have slipped a notch in social status, drifting toward the safe-and-staid realm of dentists and accountants. It’s not just because the professions have changed, but also because the standards of what makes a prestigious career have changed.

This decline, Mr. Florida argued, is rooted in a broader shift in definitions of success, essentially, a realignment of the pillars. Especially among young people, professional status is now inextricably linked to ideas of flexibility and creativity, concepts alien to seemingly everyone but art students even a generation ago.
career_paths  Managing_Your_Career  law  law_firms  Richard_Florida  hedge_funds  private_equity  movingonup  meritocratic  professional_education  young_people 
march 2012 by jerryking
Playing the race card
November 13-20, 2003 | | NOW Magazine | By Ali Sharrif
Black leaders miffed by legal clinic’s cries of racism
racism  accusations  law  lawyers  African_Canadians  mismanagement  race_card 
november 2011 by jerryking
Clinical depression | NOW Magazine
October 23-30, 2003 | NOW | By Ali Sharrif.

African Canadian Legal Clinic in turmoil over shocking audit.

the leak of a thick audit conducted by the clinic’s funder, Legal Aid Ontario, over the last week, all hell has broken loose. The document was sent to media, including to this reporter, by a clinic employee upset by the audit’s contents.

The audit, released in April, raised questions about the possible misuse of funds and inflation of client numbers, and pointed to the existence of "weak internal controls with respect to the payment of expenditures.’ Documents suggest that some $418,000 was received from various funders but not reported to Legal Aid Ontario, which backs the group to the tune of approximately $628,000 yearly.
African_Canadians  lawyers  law  irregularities  mismanagement  audits  internal_controls 
november 2011 by jerryking
Litigation Portfolio Outsourcing
To reduce costs, Fortune 500 corporations outsource a wide variety of products and services outside their core competencies (e.g., information technology, employee benefits). The corporate self-insured litigation market is the last, large cost center where outsourcing opportunities have been unavailable. Many large corporations spend more on litigation than on most services and products. Litigation is the only corporate activity where transaction costs exceed all other costs.

DryStone Capital offers corporations the opportunity to outsource litigation. DryStone focuses exclusively on defending large portfolios of litigation, including employment, personal injury, product liability, commercial and environmental. DryStone offers a buy-versus-make alternative.

DryStone Capital resolves all lawsuits for a fixed price, which includes both defense and liability cost, and is 10% less than what it would otherwise cost. Using our own capital, DryStone Capital creates a reserve to take the financial risk away and to guarantee the savings.
law  Outsourcing  litigation  financial_risk  Fortune_500  transaction_costs 
november 2011 by jerryking
‘Each of you has blazed a trail that has not existed before’ - The Globe and Mail
Jeff Gray — Law Reporter
From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Sep. 28, 2010
Jeff_Gray  law_firms  lawyers  African_Canadians  trailblazers  law 
september 2010 by jerryking
Kagan’s Climb Is Marked by Confidence and Canniness - Biography - NYTimes.com
May 10, 2010 | New York Times | This article is by Sheryl Gay Stolberg, Katharine Q. Seelye and Lisa W. Foderaro.
Elena_Kagan  nominees  U.S._Supreme_Court  profile  law  law_schools  judges 
may 2010 by jerryking
Why Technologists Want Fewer Patents - WSJ.com
JUNE 15, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by L. GORDON CROVITZ. A
book on the U.S. approach to patents, "Jefferson vs. the Patent Trolls"
by Jeffrey Matsuura, makes the key point that "intellectual property
rights were not goals in and of themselves, but were instead a mechanism
through which society attempted to facilitate creative collaboration."
patents  innovation  law  intellectual_property  L._Gordon_Crovtiz  patent_law  patent_trolls  books 
june 2009 by jerryking
Court Opening Prompts Question About Whether Gender Matters - WSJ.com
MAY 14, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by JENNIFER S. FORSYTH.

Should minority (i.e. racial, gender, disabled) U.S. Supreme Court
justices see themselves as needing to represent the views of particular
groups, or as acting as an umpire who remains neutral about who wins and
loses?
U.S._Supreme_Court  nominees  disadvantages  law  legal  gender_gap  gender_relations  judges 
may 2009 by jerryking
FT.com / UK - Why US lawyers must be fortune-tellers
October 19 2006 03:00 | Last updated: October 19 2006 03:00 FT By Patti Waldmeir
lawyers  SOX  law 
march 2009 by jerryking
Mexico's Drug Cartels May Have Become Too Powerful to Control - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 21, 2009 WSJ article by By DAVID LUHNOW and JOSé DE
CORDOBA on Mexico's poise on the tipping point into rule by drug
cartels.
law  security  Mexico  drugs  cartels  criminality  tipping_points 
february 2009 by jerryking
reportonbusiness.com: A novel idea: the end of lawyers
February 18, 2009 G&M column by JACQUIE MCNISH. Predictions
of coming new legal technologies and new business models. Richard
Susskind, a Scottish-born, Oxford-educated lawyer and legal technology
consultant based in England. Now his futurism is rattling the profession
again, this time with a new book called The End of Lawyers? Rethinking
the Nature of Legal Services.
future  business_models  law  law_firms  lawtech  lawyers 
february 2009 by jerryking

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