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jerryking : law_enforcement   3

New Ontario initiative targets complex, white-collar crimes
AUGUST 20, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | GREG MCARTHUR.

The Ontario government has quietly launched an initiative intended to solve a problem that has vexed Canadian law enforcement: the successful prosecution of complex, white-collar crimes.

With little fanfare, the province has created what it is calling the Serious Fraud Office (SFO), with a structure that is novel to Canada: teaming up investigators and prosecutors and dedicating them to financial crimes that are too sprawling for any one municipal police force to handle.....Ontario’s office, however, will investigate an array of financial crimes, not just money laundering but large-scale fraud and corruption. It was created to fix long-standing issues with how the government combats such crimes, the two officials in charge of the initiative said in an interview......One of the primary goals is to bridge gaps between investigators and prosecutors......to prevent cases from languishing and forcing judges to throw them out because of unconstitutional court delays. Unlike a traditional police investigation, the SFO’s structure means prosecutors will be heavily involved from the outset of a case........The SFO is also designed to thwart an issue common to most police departments: the frequent shifting of resources away from fraud units whenever police are confronted with a more pressing public-safety issue, such as a threat of terrorism......“White-collar crime investigations are both complex and lengthy. Specialization and long-term experience of both prosecutors and the investigators will be critical to success.”
corruption  financial_crimes  financial_penalties  fraud  fraud_detection  groundbreaking  large-scale  law_enforcement  legal_strategies  money_laundering  Ontario  prosecutors  Queens_Park  securities_enforcement  securities_industry  white-collar  white-collar_crime 
august 2019 by jerryking
Center for the Future of Museums: Painting in Blue
Thursday, December 1, 2016
Painting in Blue

Often, I must repeat what I do for a living. You teach police about art? Not exactly. I teach them to improve their observation and communication skills by learning to analyze works of art. Paintings, sculptures, and photographs have proven to be transformative tools in professional training programs for authorities in law enforcement, intelligence, and counterterrorism. Agencies from around the country and around the world are turning to museum collections to bolster their efforts to combat crime, terrorism, and unrest in our increasingly threatened and complex world....The US spends about $15B each year to train doctors, and over $100B per year to train and maintain police forces. Shouldn’t museums, drawing a direct line from their resources to improved outcomes for these and other critical social needs, be included in that support? ..... In 2001, as Head of Education at The Frick Collection, I instituted a program for medical students, The Art of Perception. Based on a model program at the Yale Center for British Art, the course took medical students from the clinical setting into an art museum to teach them to analyze works of art—big picture and small details—and articulate their observations. When they returned to the hospital, they would, we reasoned, be better observers of their patients. (You can find an assessment of the program in Bardes, Gillers, and Herman, “Learning to Look: Developing Clinical Observational Skills in an Art Museum, Medical Education, vol 35,no.12, pp.1157-1161.) Humanities in medical training has a strong historical precedent and this program underscored the value of critical thinking and visual analysis in the disciplines of both medicine and art history.
art  art_galleries  Communicating_&_Connecting  creativity  critical_thinking  empathy  historical_precedents  inferences  law_enforcement  museums  noticing  observations  pay_attention  perception  policing  the_big_picture  training_programs  visual_analysis  visual_cues 
december 2016 by jerryking

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