recentpopularlog in

jerryking : leadership   336

« earlier  
What if you’re not chosen for a ‘hi-po’ programme?
AUGUST 10, 2019 | Financial Times | Elizabeth Uviebinené.

Organisations naturally need to have a leadership pipeline through which they identify, develop and promote high potential (hi-po) employees who can lead the company in the future. However, given that most will not be selected, it is inevitable that some talented individuals will feel overlooked.

Organisations devote significant resources to these “chosen few”. They give a few individuals privileged access to training, exposure to decision makers and mentorship, all of which helps propel them towards the coveted top spot..... such programmes are invitation only. But how to get invited on to them is usually a closely guarded secret. Sometimes it is a formal process, but at other times it is at the discretion of senior management....So what happens when you are not chosen for a “fast track” programme? It is easy to start questioning your capabilities and even aspirations. It can be a motivation killer at first, leaving you feeling undervalued.....Harvard Business Review data suggests companies are bad at correctly identifying high-potential employees....The best organisations build a culture that nurtures high-potential individuals whether or not there is a formal talent development programme in place. This is especially true for women and minorities in the workplace who remain under-represented at every level in the corporate talent pipeline....New research from Northwestern University in the US suggests that early career hurdles actually help spur future success. The study showed that experiencing setbacks at the start of a career has a powerful and opposing effect: “Individuals with near misses systematically outperformed those with near wins in the long run.”

Early success does not always predict future success. Longer term, what you do when faced with disappointment usually determines whether or not you have what it takes to have a successful career....If you just missed out on a talent development programme, do not be disheartened. It leaves open the possibility of proving yourself on your own terms, rather than getting boxed into one company’s view of what leadership looks like.
career_paths  fast_track  HBR  high-achieving  invitation-only  leadership  leadership_development  Managing_Your_Career  mentoring  movingonup  selection_processes  talent  talent_management  talent_pipelines  talent_spotting  talent_scouting  training 
13 days ago by jerryking
What would Plato make of Boris Johnson?
June 22nd 2019 | the Economist | by Bagehot.

Classics (Literae Humaniores) is a wide-ranging degree devoted to the study of the literature, history, philosophy, languages and archaeology of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds. It is one of the most interdisciplinary of all degrees, and offers the opportunity to study these two foundational ancient civilisations and their reception in modern times. The degree also permits students to take extensive options in modern philosophy......

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++Mr Johnson’s failure to get a first continues to annoy him intensely—and to delight many of his rivals. But in truth it doesn’t matter a jot: the world is full of failures who got firsts, and successes who missed out. The really interesting question is not whether Mr Johnson’s results reveal some great intellectual weakness. It is what light the subject of his studies can throw on his qualifications to be prime minister. The classics corpus is full of meditations on the qualities that make for a good leader. And no classical author thought more profoundly about the subject than Plato, the philosopher who was put at the heart of Oxford’s classics syllabus by Balliol’s greatest master, Benjamin Jowett. What would Plato have made of the classicist who appears destined to be Balliol’s fourth prime minister since 1900?.....In “The Republic”, Plato argued that the most important qualities in a statesman were truthfulness and expertise. A good statesman will “never willingly tolerate an untruth”. (“Is it possible to combine in the same character a love of wisdom and a love of falsehood?” one of Plato’s characters asks. “Quite impossible,” comes the reply.) He will spend his life studying everything that he needs to make him a good captain of the ship of state—“the seasons of the year, the sky, the stars, the winds and other professional subjects”. .......By contrast, Plato argued, the surest signs of a bad leader are narcissism and self-indulgence. The poor statesman is an eloquent flatterer, who relies on his ability to entertain the masses with speeches and comic turns, but doesn’t bother to develop a coherent view of the world. Plato was particularly vitriolic about the scions of the upper classes who are offered the opportunity to study philosophy while young but don’t apply themselves, because they think they are so talented that they needn’t earn their place at the top table.......“The Republic” is haunted by the fear that democracies eventually degenerate into tyrannies. Democracy is the most alluring form of government: “the diversity of its characters, like the different colours in a patterned dress, make it look very attractive.” But it is inherently unstable. Citizens are so consumed by pleasure-seeking that they beggar the economy; so hostile to authority that they ignore the advice of experts; and so committed to liberty that they lose any common purpose......As democracies collapse under the pressure of their contradictions, panicked citizens look for salvation in a demagogue. These are men who love power, but cannot control their own desires for “holidays and dinners and parties and girlfriends and so on”. Plato calls them the “most wretched of men because of the disorder raging within them”. Citizens are so consumed by fear that they think these wretches have magical abilities to solve the country’s problems and restore proper order. Demagogues get their start by “taking over a particularly obedient mob”, before seizing control of the country. But the more power they acquire the worse things become, “for the doctor removes the poison and leaves the healthy elements in the body, while the tyrant does the opposite.”

The shadow on the wall
Democracies have proved more durable than Plato imagined. And his cure for the problems of democracy—the rule of philosopher-kings, who are expected to hold their wives and children in common—is eccentric to put it mildly. But he is right that character matters. Politicians can change their advisers or their policies, but character is sticky. He is also right that democracies can suddenly give way to populist authoritarianism...... The best way to prepare for a Johnson premiership is to re-read “The Republic”, hoping Plato is wrong but preparing for the fact that he may be right
Boris_Johnson  character_traits  contradictions  demagoguery  democracies  Greek  humanities  leaders  leadership  liberal_arts  opposing_actions  Oxford  pairs  philosophers  Plato  politicians  Romans  statesmen  truth-telling  United_Kingdom 
5 weeks ago by jerryking
At a Critical Time for U.S. Soccer, Abby Wambach Is on a Mission
April 15, 2019| WSJ | By Jocelyn Silver.

Wambach’s latest book, a feminist guidebook called Wolfpack: How to Come Together, Unleash Our Power, and Change the Game. The crisp, 112-page “rally cry” stems from a viral commencement speech that Wambach delivered at Barnard College in 2018, in which she recounted the story of how biologists reintroduced wolves into Yellowstone National Park, where they improved the park’s ecosystem. Wambach compares women to wolves, encouraging them to break out of fairytale narratives. “If I could go back and tell my younger self one thing it would be this,” she said in the address. “Abby, you were never Little Red Riding Hood. You were always the Wolf.”

At Plymouth Church, Wambach sports a shirt reading “Ain’t No Little Red.” Doyle opts for a “Wolfpack” hat and black patent leather Louboutins. She comes onstage with arms whirling, miming punches.

As a two-time Olympic gold medalist and the world’s all-time top goal scorer of any gender, Wambach retired in 2015, notching a World Cup title on her fourth try. Though she wrote a more traditional sports memoir shortly after, Wolfpack marks a shift into more clearly demarcated self-help. It traces an arc in her personal life.
Abby_Wambach  affirmations  athletes_&_athletics  books  commencement  domino_effects  empowerment  failure  inspiration  leadership  lessons_learned  mission-driven  quotes  rules_of_the_game  rule_breaking  soccer  speeches  sports  superstars  tokenism  women 
april 2019 by jerryking
Abby Wambach’s Leadership Lessons: Be the Wolf
April 9, 2019 | The New York Times | By Maya Salam.

“So many of us can relate to playing by rules that were never set up for us to win.”
— Abby Wambach, two-time Olympic gold medalist and World Cup champion.

Abby Wambach, who led the United States women’s team to a World Cup championship in 2015, is focused on a new kind of goal: motivating women to become leaders.....In her new book, “Wolfpack,” Wambach, 38, shares lessons she learned from decades of training, failure and triumph on the field. It is based on the commencement speech she gave at Barnard College in New York in 2018.

“If I could go back and tell my younger self one thing, it would be this: ‘Abby, you were never Little Red Riding Hood; you were always the wolf,’”.......In “Wolfpack,” Wambach offers eight new rules to help women succeed professionally and personally. And she hopes her ideas trigger a domino effect. “When one person stands up and demands the ball, the job, the promotion, the paycheck, the microphone, that one gives others permission to do the same,”

Here are the four of her “new rules,” and the norms she hopes they’ll upend:
(1) “Champion each other.”
Old Rule: Be against each other.
New Rule: Be FOR each other.
“Power and success and joy are not pies,” Wambach writes. “A bigger slice for one woman doesn’t mean a smaller slice for another.”
(2) “Be grateful and ambitious.”
Old Rule: Be grateful for what you have.
New Rule: Be grateful for what you have AND demand what you deserve.
“I was so grateful for a paycheck, so grateful to represent my country, so grateful to be the token woman at the table, so grateful to receive any respect at all that I was afraid to use my voice to demand more,” Wambach writes. “Our gratitude is how power uses the tokenism of a few women to keep the rest of us in line.”
(3) “Make failure your fuel.”
Old Rule: Failure means you’re out of the game.
New Rule: Failure means you’re finally IN the game.
“Imperfect men have been empowered and permitted to run the world since the beginning of time,” Wambach writes. “It’s time for imperfect women to grant themselves permission to join them.”
(4) “Lead from the bench.”
Old Rule: Wait for permission to lead.
New Rule: Lead now — from wherever you are.
“The picture of leadership is not just a man at the head of a table,” Wambach writes. “It’s also every woman who is allowing her own voice to guide her life and the lives of those she cares about.”
Abby_Wambach  affirmations  athletes_&_athletics  books  commencement  domino_effects  empowerment  failure  inspiration  leadership  lessons_learned  quotes  rules_of_the_game  rule_breaking  soccer  speeches  sports  superstars  tokenism  women 
april 2019 by jerryking
I covered the City for 20 years — here’s what I learnt
March 8, 2019 | Financial Times | by Sarah Gordon |

Sarah Gordon says businesses must do more to improve their image and dispel widespread misconceptions
culture  farewells  finance  financial_journalism  leadership  lessons_learned  noughties  women 
march 2019 by jerryking
Apple’s Executive Shake-Up Readies Company for Life After iPhone
Feb. 18, 2019 | WSJ | By Tripp Mickle.

Apple Inc. is shaking up leadership and reordering priorities across its services, artificial intelligence, hardware and retail divisions as it works to reduce the company’s reliance on iPhone sales......The primary reasons for the shifts vary by division. But collectively, they reflect Apple’s efforts to transition from an iPhone-driven company into one where growth flows from services and potentially transformative technologies......Apple has also trimmed 200 staffers from its autonomous-vehicle project, and is redirecting much of the engineering resources in its services business, led by Eddy Cue, into efforts around Hollywood programming......The competitive landscape could complicate Apple’s efforts to diversify beyond the iPhone. Media services like Netflix Inc. and Spotify Technology SA have a head start and more subscribers; Google’s autonomous-vehicle initiative has logged more miles on the road; and Amazon.com Inc.’s Echo speakers have put Alexa into millions of homes.

Apple spent $14.24 billion on research and development last year, a 23% increase from the year prior........Though the iPhone still contributes about two-thirds of Apple sales, the company has encouraged investors to focus on a growing services business, which includes streaming-music subscriptions, app-store sales and mobile payments.....The services business also is key to preserving iPhone loyalty. Just as Amazon has used media and music offerings to increase the value of Prime membership, Apple executives view its mobile payments, music service and coming video offering as ways to encourage current iPhone owners to buy future Apple handsets.....Apple is also expected to lean on its artificial-intelligence team to personalize the services on people’s devices.
actors  Apple  App_Store  Apple_IDs  artificial_intelligence  autonomous_vehicles  celebrities  competitive_landscape  hardware  Hollywood  iPhone  leadership  mobile_payments  overreliance  priorities  R&D  retailers  services  smart_speakers  streaming  subscriptions  Tim_Cook 
february 2019 by jerryking
Harold Brown, Defense Secretary in Carter Administration, Dies at 91
Jan. 5, 2019 | The New York Times | By Robert D. McFadden.

Harold Brown, a brilliant scientist who helped develop America’s nuclear arsenal and negotiate its first strategic arms control treaty, and who was President Jimmy Carter’s secretary of defense in an era of rising Soviet challenges, died on Friday at his home in Rancho Santa Fe, Calif. He was 91.....As defense secretary from 1977 to 1981, Mr. Brown presided over the most formidable power in history: legions of intercontinental ballistic missiles and fleets of world-ranging bombers and nuclear submarines, with enough warheads to wipe out Soviet society many times over......In retrospect, experts say, the Carter administration and Mr. Brown maintained the strategic balance, countering Soviet aircraft and ballistic innovations by improving land-based ICBMs, by upgrading B-52 strategic bombers with low-flying cruise missiles and by deploying far more submarine-launched missiles tipped with MIRVs, or multiple warheads that split into independent trajectories to hit many targets......By the time he joined the Carter administration, Mr. Brown had played important roles in the defense establishment for two decades — in nuclear weapons research, in development of Polaris missiles, in directing the Pentagon’s multibillion-dollar weapons research program, and in helping to plot strategy for the Vietnam War as secretary of the Air Force.....He had been a protégé of Edward Teller, father of the hydrogen bomb, and his successor as head of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in California. He had been president of the California Institute of Technology; had worked for Presidents John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson and Richard M. Nixon; and had been a delegate to the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT I). As the first scientist to become defense secretary, Mr. Brown knew the technological complexities of modern warfare. He began the development of “stealth” aircraft, with low profiles on radar. He accelerated the Trident submarine program and the conversion of older Poseidon subs to carry MIRVs. And, with an eye on cost-effectiveness, he and President Carter halted the B-1 bomber as a successor to the B-52. Mr. Brown laid the groundwork for talks that produced the Camp David accords, mediated by Mr. Carter and signed in 1978 by President Anwar el-Sadat of Egypt and Prime Minister Menachem Begin of Israel. ......In 1980, Mr. Brown helped plan a mission to rescue American hostages held by Iranians who seized the American Embassy in Tehran in November 1979.......Harold Brown was born in New York City on Sept. 19, 1927, the only son of Abraham Brown, a lawyer, and Gertrude Cohen Brown. From childhood he was considered a genius. At 15, he graduated from the Bronx High School of Science with a 99.52 average. At Columbia University, he studied physics and earned three degrees — a bachelor’s in only two years, graduating in 1945 with highest honors; a master’s in 1946; and a doctorate in 1949, when he was 21.....From 1961 to 1965, he was director of defense research and engineering, the Pentagon’s third-ranking civilian, responsible for weapons development, and one of Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara’s “whiz kids.” He was the Air Force secretary from 1965 to 1969, and over the next eight years he was president of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

After leaving the Pentagon in 1981, Mr. Brown taught at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University for several years, and from 1984 to 1992 he was chairman of the school’s foreign policy institute.

Since 1990, he had been a partner at Warburg Pincus, the New York investment firm.
'60s  '70s  Caltech  Colleges_&_Universities  Jimmy_Carter  leadership  obituaries  Pentagon  physicists  SAIS  SecDef  security_&_intelligence  the_best_and_brightest  Vietnam_War  whiz_kids  Cold_War  public_servants 
january 2019 by jerryking
Overcoming adversity: In the footsteps of polar explorer Shackleton
December 22, 2018 | Financial Times | by Sarah Gordon.

In 2013 Tim Jarvis, an adventurer and environmental scientist, re-enacted Sir Ernest Shackleton’s 1916 epic journey, sailing a replica of his boat 1,500km across the Southern Ocean from Antarctica, where Shackleton’s men were stranded for more than a year, to South Georgia island, then climbing over its mountainous interior to the site of the whaling station where Shackleton finally found help.....Mr Jarvis’ team used the same rudimentary equipment, clothing, rations and technology as had been used a century earlier......Jarvis' Shackleton expedition, like the original, hit numerous hurdles:
(1) loss of a sponsor;
(2) a gruelling sea leg of their journey, navigating storms and treacherous currents to reach South Georgia;
(3) three of the six team members had trench foot and some frostbite and were unable to embark on the next phase, the mountain climb across the island.

Jarvis coped by “trying to take a leaf out of Shackleton’s book”, keeping people busy, staying completely focused himself and “not even entertaining” the thought of stopping. He and the other lead climber, former Marine Baz Gray, isolated themselves in order to stop others’ negativity clouding their judgment before tackling the mountains ahead. There were no rows, says Mr Jarvis, but there were tears......“If you feel that at some level the risk and the fear are worth it, you will overcome it.”.....Choosing the right team for a challenge as extreme as this required unorthodox methods. For Mr Jarvis, the best team is about people whose skills complement one another rather than just the best individuals. But he also needed to make sure that team members could really do what they said they could....You don't want “employees”. “When the chips are down, you want someone who feels that they’ve invested a lot in [the expedition] and it’s theirs . . . ”Jarvis believes the expedition taught him how to set a positive example, how to recognise which buttons to press to get people to apply themselves more, and how to deal with “multi-dimensional” challenges, not just physical, but reputational and financial. “On the sea I wasn’t the best sailor. On the land I wasn’t the best climber. All you’ve got is your leadership, your conviction that you can pull it off, your bloody-minded determination to continue.”
adversity  Antartica  Ernest_Shackleton  expeditions  explorers  leadership  multidimensional  negativity_bias  obstacles  pessimism  teams  re-enactments  selection_processes  South_Pole  torchbearers  unorthodox 
december 2018 by jerryking
Exploring the dark side of leadership - The Globe and Mail
JUSTIN WEINHARDT
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED JANUARY 14, 2015
UPDATED MAY 12, 2018

The first three characteristics of this dark side are commonly referred to as the Dark Triad. ....overconfidence can be the fourth characteristic, leading to a dark square of leadership.

Machiavellianism - characterized by manipulative tactics, a pessimistic view of humanity and an emphasis on efficiency over moral principles.... individuals who exhibit Machiavellianism will lie, manipulate and exploit others to get their way.

Psychopathy - not just a characteristic of serial killers. Individuals high on psychopathy have poor impulse control, show little remorse for others, including individuals they harm, and lack concern for the morality of their actions. They use threats and hard tactics in the workplace to gain status and get ahead.

Narcissism - have extremely inflated views of themselves, with grandiose plans for their future.

Overconfidence - "Act as if you have unmatched confidence and then people will surely have confidence in you," says Jordan Belfort in his book The Wolf of Wall Street. This is sad but true. Individuals who exemplify overconfidence are better able to influence others and gain their trust.

So, what is an organization to do about the dark side of leadership? Those who are passionate about leadership must shine a light on the dark side.

The bright side of leadership: Humility -- "an interpersonal characteristic that emerges in social contexts that connotes (a) a manifested willingness to view oneself accurately, (b) displayed appreciation of others' strengths and contributions, and (c) teachability." Leaders with greater humility are better able to deal with the realities of the modern economy such as shocks, rapid technological advances and uncertain demand. On the strategic side, humble leaders will be less overconfident and risky.
leadership  dark_side  humility  leaders  ethical  Niccolo_Machiavelli 
june 2018 by jerryking
Chaos has its limits even in Donald Trump’s White House
March 23, 2018 | FT | Tim Harford.

The disadvantage of chaos is that it is destabilising; the advantage is that it may destabilise your foes more than you. About four decades ago the US military strategist John Boyd gave a series of influential talks about this idea.

Boyd, whose admirers included senior Republican Dick Cheney and management guru Tom Peters, argued for rapid, confusing manoeuvres, improvised if need be, with the aim of disorienting the enemy. Create enough chaos and you could completely paralyse your foe. If the chaos made life uncomfortable for your own side, no matter. Synchronisation, said Boyd, was not for organisations, but for watches.

This messy, improvised approach to tactics is not entirely new. Sun Tzu, the near-mythical author of The Art of War, declared that “quickness is the essence of war”, but also advised being “without ascertainable shape”. This sounds like the incessant, incomprehensible activity of the Trump White House.....On the battlefield, the master of messy improvisation was the German general Erwin Rommel. He championed swift, energetic action, even if it left his own men scrambling to figure out what was happening.....The same fast-paced seizing of opportunities has worked for some businesses. In the early years of Amazon, Jeff Bezos was clear that he needed to get ahead of rivals such as Barnes & Noble and Toys R Us, even if it meant chaos within Amazon. A more methodical start-up would have been caught and crushed....Of course the more ponderous forces of planning and organisation may reassert themselves in the end....Facebook’s old mantra, “move fast and break things”, suddenly looks less clever. Mark Zuckerberg must now explain exactly what he has broken.....there are limits to improvisation, ambiguity and self-contradictions....On a playing field criss-crossed by technical and legal details, EU negotiator Michel Barnier’s ploddingly careful preparation now seems to be paying dividends.
blitzkrieg  chaos  destabilization  fast-paced  improvisation  leadership  messiness  Sun_Tzu  Tim_Harford  Tom_Peters 
march 2018 by jerryking
Daniel S. Schwartz of Restaurant Brands International on the Value of Hard Work
SEPT. 8, 2017 | The New York Times| By ADAM BRYANT.

When you think about your leadership style today, do you see their[his parent's] influence?

Probably the biggest influence they’ve had is about always being very respectful of other people. Neither of them led teams or organizations, but there was always this emphasis on kindness and manners and just being a good person.

I always have that in the back of my head, regardless of who I’m talking to. The world’s a small place, life’s short, and so you should only be nice to people. I don’t raise my voice at work. I don’t have tantrums.......Alex Behring, who heads up 3G, gave me some great advice early on. He said that you have to manage the people, not the business. .....What were other early lessons for you?

If you want to change something or if you want to really influence or impact someone, you need to be in that person’s market and be with them face to face. You can’t run a multinational business from your desk. You can’t just get on the phone and tell the people that you need to do things differently.

If you make the trip, that’s a big investment of time for you. People appreciate that, and they’re going to be more open to your feedback. You’ll also have more credibility because you’ve seen their business and been in their market......How do you hire?

I like people who are passionate, who have persevered and who are clearly humble and not arrogant. It’s O.K. to be confident, but not arrogant. I like people who genuinely are looking for a project and not a job.
CEOs  hard_work  Tim_Hortons  Popeyes  Burger_King  hiring  leadership  3G_Capital  RBI  Daniel_Schwartz  lessons_learned  humility 
september 2017 by jerryking
It’s a Diverse City, but Most Big Museum Boards Are Strikingly White
AUG. 22, 2017 | The New York Times | By ROBIN POGREBIN.

Whether arts groups will make real progress is an open question. Cultural organizations have often struggled to identify minority board members capable of meeting the high donations — often millions of dollars — demanded by the city’s leading arts organizations.

“The hardest nut to crack is going to be the boards,” Mr. Finkelpearl said, adding that executives need to think about ways besides money that trustees of color can add value, namely through their art collections, personal connections or professional expertise.
Bill_de_Blasio  Darren_Walker  New_York_City  Manhattan  museums  cultural_institutions  diversity  leadership  curation  Ford_Foundation  visible_minorities  MoMA  boards_&_directors_&_governance  theatre  African-Americans 
august 2017 by jerryking
Canada can no longer rely on U.S. for global leadership, Freeland says - The Globe and Mail
ROBERT FIFE AND MICHELLE ZILIO
OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jun. 06, 2017

Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland says the Liberal government will make a “substantial investment” in the military because Canada can no longer rely on Washington for global leadership in the face of threats of Russian adventurism and the need to combat the “monstrous extremism” of Islamic State......Ms. Freeland said Canada has been able to count on the powerful U.S. military to provide a protective shield since 1945 as she argued this country needs to significantly build up the Canadian military with “a substantial investment” to help confront strategic threats to liberal democracies.

“To rely solely on the U.S. security umbrella would make us a client state,” she said. “To put it plainly: Canadian diplomacy and development sometimes requires the backing of hard power.”

Ms. Freeland listed North Korea, the civil war in Syria, the Islamic State, Russian aggression in the Ukraine and Baltic states and climate change as major threats to the global order.

“We will make the necessary investments in our military, to not only address years of neglect and underfunding, but also to place the Canadian Armed Forces on a new footing – with new equipment, training, resources and consistent and predictable funding,” she said.....The minister described how and why Canada’s role in the Second World War allowed the country to help shape the post-1945 multilateral order.

Canada has continued to play a large role in promoting multiculturalism and diversity and providing a home to the downtrodden – refugees fleeing persecution, famine or wars – she said. It has taken a strong stand on the world stage, promoting gender equality and a rule-based international order.
U.S.foreign_policy  Donald_Trump  Canada  Canadian  foreign_policy  leadership  Chrystia_Freeland  ISIS  hard_power  sovereignty  WWII  post-WWII  world_stage 
june 2017 by jerryking
To Be Great, America Must Be Good
JUNE 2, 2017 | The New York Times | By SUSAN E. RICE.

Four and a half months is not long, but President Trump has accomplished an extraordinary amount in a short time. With shocking speed, he has wreaked havoc: hobbling our core alliances, jettisoning American values and abdicating United States leadership of the world. That’s a whole lot of winning — for Russia and China......And now the president has pulled the United States out of the Paris climate agreement, putting us at odds with virtually the entire world. Europe and China stand together on the Paris accord, while the United States is isolated.

This last, disastrous decision is the coup de grâce for America’s postwar global leadership for the foreseeable future. It was not taken from us by any adversary, nor lost as a result of economic crisis or collapse of empire. America voluntarily gave up that leadership — because we quit the field....How consequential is this choice? The network of alliances that distinguishes America from other powers and has kept our nation safe and strong for decades is now in jeopardy. We will see the cost when next we need the world to rally to our side.....Congressional delegations, governors and mayors can reassure our key allies that the American people still value them and that we do not intend to cede our global leadership. We must make clear to our foreign partners that this present policy is an aberration, not the new normal.

American corporations and civil society groups can assist by demonstrating that the United States remains committed to its integration into the global economy and to our democratic principles. In the absence of White House leadership, the American people should act as informal ambassadors, via contacts through tourism, study-abroad programs and cultural exchanges.
Susan_Rice  Donald_Trump  White_House  alliances  post-WWII  NATO  TPP  leadership  APNSA  values  global_economy  new_normal 
june 2017 by jerryking
On the Vimy anniversary, it’s time we all learned the name Arthur Currie - The Globe and Mail
DONALD MACLEOD
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Apr. 09, 2017

we should celebrate Sir Arthur Currie and, perhaps, take a cue from our Australian cousins and consider promoting him to the rank of field marshal in the name of the soldiers of the Canadian Corp he led.
leadership  recognition  WWI  anniversaries  soldiers  Vimy  generalship  nation_building  history  Canadian  Canada  memorials  commemoration  militaries 
april 2017 by jerryking
Political leadership in the Caribbean –
Feb 05, 2017 Features | Kaieteur News | By Sir Ronald Sanders.

The aspirations of today’s Caribbean leaders are no different to Castro’s; their circumstances are different. Caribbean economies are small and, when there is an economic downturn or some major calamity in the countries with which we trade or from which our foreign investment comes, our economies become constrained. It’s not that the leaders would not like to do better, they are operating in restricted circumstances, and they do the best they can. They have no champion as Castro had with the Soviet Union.
But, they miss opportunities by not doing more together. .....CARICOM is a valuable tool for the advancement of the Caribbean people and for Caribbean countries individually and collectively. Unfortunately, since independence, a kind of false nationalism has crept into our psyche; one which, in some cases, cannot admit to being as much a citizen of the Caribbean region as a national of a country within it. Part of the reason is that leaders don’t give effective leadership on this issue.....In almost every Caribbean country, there exists an anathema to migrants from other Caribbean countries, displayed particularly at Airports where Caribbean people face discrimination.......There has not been sufficient advocacy of Caribbean integration by the leadership of the region to help people to understand that, whether or not we came in the same ship, we are now in the same boat and that boat is in turbulent waters. All of us in that boat have to row it together, if not we will sink together....The point is that our circumstances are such that we need each other; no single country in the Caribbean – none, not Trinidad and Tobago, with its oil and gas resources, not Guyana with its vast land and natural resources, not Jamaica with its large population can survive on its own.
The world is tough, and it is only by the marrying and integrating of our resources at all levels that we can hope to do better. If we continue to let integration languish, I am afraid we are writing our own suicide drama and we are acting it out. We have to overcome it. And, political leadership matters – from governing and opposition parties alike.............
leadership  politicians  Caribbean  Caricom  missed_opportunities  parochialism  competitiveness_of_nations  nationalism  integration  loyal_opposition  small_states  human_psyche 
february 2017 by jerryking
Pamela Joyner: collector of ‘Afropolitan abstraction’
SEPTEMBER 30, 2016 | FT| by Julie Belcove.

.....Joyner and Giuffrida are not merely acquisitive in the vein of so many collectors but are activist. “We think of ourselves as stewards of their careers,” Joyner says of their artists. “Our philanthropy is focused on getting works of the artists who we support into museums....Joyner and Guiffrida donate paintings to leading museums in the UK and the US. Joyner introduces those museum curators to talented-but-lesser-known artists for whom she advocates. She also organizes trips domestically and internationally (.e.g South Africa) for museum curators....Joyner and Guiffrida created an artist’s residency on their property in Sonoma, California, in 2014.....Artists return the loyalty and remark that Joyner and Guiffrida never ask for a discount....Joyner has made collecting — and sitting on boards — her primary occupation. “Now I have a strategy, I have a budget,” she says. “I run it like you’d expect an MBA to run it.”...“Race is a really bad lens through which to view art. I could make an argument that Zander Blom is far more African than I am.”....“I was really struck by these artists who were determined to create an aesthetic that was compelling to them, which was abstraction, and there were no rewards for that if you were an African-American artist at the time,” Joyner says. “The traditional art world expected African-American artists to create identifiably black subject matter. ....The daughter of two public school teachers, Joyner, 58, grew up on the South Side of Chicago, where she attended the prestigious University of Chicago Laboratory Schools and frequented the Art Institute of Chicago. A serious ballet dancer, Joyner took a year off from Dartmouth College to try to break into the professional ranks in New York. “What I discovered was, I was really average,” she says frankly. “That was a good thing to discover early. I decided at that juncture that I would become a patron of the arts.”

Patronage requires money, so Joyner went on to Harvard Business School, then a successful career in finance.....With 300 to 400 artworks by roughly 100 artists, among them contemporary masters Glenn Ligon, Julie Mehretu, Mark Bradford and Kara Walker, the collection is the subject of a new book, Four Generations: The Joyner/Giuffrida Collection of Abstract Art, written by a Who’s Who of top curators. In October 2017, a travelling exhibition of the collection’s highlights will open at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art in New Orleans.
art  collectors  women  African-Americans  curators  Diaspora  artists  museums  philanthropy  marginalization  leadership  patronage  high_net_worth  benefactors  cultural_literacy  Afropolitan  activism  race  HBS  abstractions  books  stewardship  Pamela_Joyner  contemporary_art  champions 
october 2016 by jerryking
Taking On the Boys’ Club at the Art Museum - The New York Times
By SONNET STANFILLOCT. 19, 2016
Continue reading the main storyShare This Page
Share
Tweet
Email
More
Save
museums  leadership  CEOs 
october 2016 by jerryking
Righting Wrongs and Generating Attention for Art of the African Diaspora
OCT. 16, 2016 | The New York Times | By TED LOOS.

A profile of Pamela J. Joyner, a prolific art collector and supporter of artists of African descent..... Later, Ms. Joyner donated money to buy another Gilliam, “Whirlirama” (1970), and next year there are plans to exhibit both when the Met reinstalls its modern collection. “Pamela is such an informed champion of her artists,” Ms. Wagstaff said.

That trip to Washington was one of the many ways that Ms. Joyner, 58, exerts her power as an art-world influence behind the scenes. She has relinquished a successful business career to become what she calls a full-time “mission-driven” collector of a very specific niche: Abstract art by African-Americans and members of the global African diaspora. Now she leverages her relationships with the Met in New York, the Tate in London, the Art Institute in Chicago and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art to help these artists gain traction in the wider world.

“It’s no less ambitious than an effort to reframe art history,” said Ms. Joyner, who sees herself as righting a wrong. “First, to include more broadly those who have been overlooked — and, for those with visibility, to steward and contextualize those careers.”....“There was a keen sense in my household that you had to be prepared for whatever was going to happen,” Ms. Joyner said. “You needed these literacies, and cultural literacy was one of them.”
African-Americans  Diaspora  art  artists  collectors  museums  overlooked  philanthropy  leadership  patronage  high_net_worth  benefactors  cultural_literacy  women  marginalization  Pamela_Joyner  stewardship  reframing  mission-driven  champions  art_history  exclusion  prolificacy 
october 2016 by jerryking
At BlackRock, a Wall Street Rock Star’s $5 Trillion Comeback - The New York Times
SEPT. 15, 2016 | NYT | By LANDON THOMAS Jr.

(1) Laurence Fink: “If you think you know everything about our business, you are kidding yourself,” he said. “The biggest question we have to answer is: ‘Are we developing the right leaders?’” “Are you,” he asked, “prepared to be one of those leaders?”

(2) BlackRock was thriving because of its focus on low-risk, low-cost funds and the all-seeing wonders of Aladdin. BlackRock sees the future of finance as being rules-based, data-driven, systematic investment styles such as exchange-traded funds, which track a variety of stock and bond indexes or adhere to a set of financial rules. Fink believes that his algorithmic driven style will, over time, grow faster than the costlier “active investing” model in which individuals, not algorithms, make stock, bond and asset allocation decisions.

Most money management firms highlight their investment returns first, and risk controls second. BlackRock has taken a reverse approach: It believes that risk analysis, such as gauging how a security will trade if interest rates go up or down, improves investment results.

(3) BlackRock, along with central banks, sovereign wealth funds — have become the new arbiters of "flow.“ It is not about the flow of securities anymore, it is about the flow of information and indications of interest.”

(4) Asset Liability and Debt and Derivatives Investment Network (Aladdin), is BlackRock's big data-mining, risk-mitigation platform/framework. Aladdin is a network of code, trades, chat, algorithms and predictive models that on any given day can highlight vulnerabilities and opportunities connected to the trillions that BlackRock firm tracks — including the portion which belongs to outside firms that pay BlackRock a fee to have access to the platform. Aladdin stress-tests how securities will respond to certain situations (e.g. a sudden rise in interest rates or what happens in the event of a political surprise, like Donald J. Trump being elected president.)

In San Francisco, a team of equity analysts deploys data analysis to study the language that CEOs use during an earnings call. Unusually bearish this quarter, compared with last? If so, maybe the stock is a sell. “We have more information than anyone,” Mr. Fink said.
systematic_approaches  ETFs  Wall_Street  BlackRock  Laurence_Fink  asset_management  traders  complacency  future  finance  Aladdin  risk-management  financiers  financial_services  central_banks  money_management  information_flows  volatility  economic_downturn  liquidity  bonds  platforms  frameworks  stress-tests  monitoring  CEOs  succession  risk-analysis  leadership  order_management_system  sovereign_wealth_funds  market_intelligence  intentionality  data_mining  collective_intelligence  risk-mitigation  rules-based  risks  asset_values  scaling  scenario-planning  databases 
september 2016 by jerryking
Ben Chestnut of MailChimp: Learn to Love the Job You’ve Got - The New York Times
By ADAM BRYANT SEPT. 2, 2016

What are some leadership lessons?

Never sacrifice momentum. I might know a better path, but if we’ve got a lot of momentum, if everyone’s united and they’re marching together and the path is O.K., just go with the flow. I may eventually nudge them down a new path, but never stop the troops midmarch.
CEOs  leadership  lessons_learned  momentum  operational_tempo 
september 2016 by jerryking
Why America’s Leadership Fails - The New York Times
David Brooks AUG. 23, 2016
Continue reading the main storyShare This Page
Share
Tweet
Email
More
Save
leadership  David_Brooks 
august 2016 by jerryking
No Canadians need apply: the worrying trend in arts hiring - The Globe and Mail
KATE TAYLOR
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Aug. 05, 2016

What is worrying is the pattern: It suggests that Canadian cultural institutions are not nurturing their own talents.

If Canadian curators cannot aspire to eventually manage the museums where they work, or Canadian stage directors need never consider running Canada’s festivals, they will not give their institutions the best of themselves. They will either slump into the self-fulfilling prophecy of lower expectations or they will go abroad.

Of course, museum and festival management is, like many a business, an increasingly global game and these things do go through cycles – Anderson was rapidly replaced by one of his Canadian curators, Matthew Teitelbaum, a Torontonian who ran the AGO for 17 years before moving to the helm of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts last year.

But the recent trend suggests that the boards of large Canadian institutions need to band together to discuss how they can better mentor and nurture potential leaders.

Perhaps they should also take a careful look at the assumptions they are making in their hiring processes. These big appointments are often trumpeted with announcements that stress the long, complicated and, most of all, international searches that have been undertaken to find candidates. That may actually be part of the problem: the increasing use of headhunters to fill these jobs. Executive-recruitment agencies charging large fees to conduct searches deep into the United States or over to Europe are unlikely to conclude that the best person for the job is sitting down the hall or across the street from the incumbent.
cultural_institutions  CEOs  hiring  glass_ceilings  Canadian  museums  galleries  arts  festivals  boards_&_directors_&_governance  home_grown  mentoring  institutional_memory  executive_search  succession  leadership  curators 
august 2016 by jerryking
Daniel S. Glaser: The Challenge of Keeping It Simple
JULY 15, 2016 | The New York Times | By ADAM BRYANT.

When I joined Marsh more than 30 years ago, he said to me, “Danny, all I can tell you is that there’s going to be a lot of people who don’t think like an owner, and you should always be thinking like you are the owner of the business, and make your decisions like that.”..Empathy is more important as he matured: "Now I have a basic belief that almost everyone wants to contribute and do well. Some people, for a whole variety of reasons, have difficulty doing that, and at least an attempt or two should be made to try to help them."...I’ve always felt that the world is filled with smart people who love complicating stuff. Working to simplify, to try to get down to that first principle, is really important.....My feeling is that companies that do well for long stretches of time have a tendency to become either complacent or arrogant, and both of those are bad paths. So how do you prevent that? To me, you do that by trying to create this striving, challenging, questioning culture, where there’s always a smarter way of doing something, and you feel a permanent dissatisfaction with obtained results.
bonuses  empathy  CEOs  leadership  leaders  complacency  arrogance  hubris  hiring  organizational_culture  forward_looking  simplicity  Marsh_&_McLennan  owners  dissatisfaction  first_principle  restlessness 
july 2016 by jerryking
The Power of ‘Why?’ and ‘What If?’ - The New York Times
JULY 2, 2016 | New York Times | By WARREN BERGER.

business leaders want the people working around them to be more curious, more cognizant of what they don’t know, and more inquisitive — about everything, including “Why am I doing my job the way I do it?” and “How might our company find new opportunities?”....Companies in many industries today must contend with rapid change and rising uncertainty. In such conditions, even a well-established company cannot rest on its expertise; there is pressure to keep learning what’s new and anticipating what’s next. It’s hard to do any of that without asking questions.

Steve Quatrano, a member of the Right Question Institute, a nonprofit research group, explains that the act of formulating questions enables us “to organize our thinking around what we don’t know.” This makes questioning a good skill to hone in dynamic times.....So how can companies encourage people to ask more questions? There are simple ways to train people to become more comfortable and proficient at it. For example, question formulation exercises can be used as a substitute for conventional brainstorming sessions. The idea is to put a problem or challenge in front of a group of people and instead of asking for ideas, instruct participants to generate as many relevant questions as they can.......Getting employees to ask more questions is the easy part; getting management to respond well to those questions can be harder.......think of “what if” and “how might we” questions about the company’s goals and plans........Leaders can also encourage companywide questioning by being more curious and inquisitive themselves.
asking_the_right_questions  questions  curiosity  humility  pretense_of_knowledge  unknowns  leadership  innovation  idea_generation  ideas  information_gaps  cost_of_inaction  expertise  anticipating  brainstorming  dynamic  change  uncertainty  rapid_change  inquisitiveness  Dr.Alexander's_Question  incisiveness  leaders  companywide 
july 2016 by jerryking
Beth Comstock of General Electric: Granting Permission to Innovate - The New York Times
By ADAM BRYANT JUNE 17, 2016

Early on, I wasn’t confident, and I’m sure that showed. I probably asked a lot of questions that started with, “Would you …? Could you …? Might you think about …?”

There was probably a tentativeness about me. But I also remember being very impatient about wanting things to go faster in my career, and wanting people to move faster.

I’ve also had to learn to ask for help, rather than waiting until everything is perfectly done. Sometimes you feel like you can’t put an idea out there until you’ve looked at it from every angle, as opposed to saying, “Here’s a seed of an idea, help me make it better.” In those early days, I was afraid to put something out there if it wasn’t totally baked and perfect.

Being part of collaborative teams, I’ve come to appreciate the power of them a lot more than I did early on. When you get the teamwork right, it’s like magic because everybody has a role. You’re different, but you come together and you have a mission.

Those are the things I really love about work. When it hasn’t worked, it’s because the team hasn’t been right. The dynamics aren’t right.
CEOs  GE  innovation  women  Beth_Comstock  leadership  teams  asking_for_help  personal_chemistry 
june 2016 by jerryking
Black America and the Class Divide - The New York Times
By HENRY LOUIS GATES Jr.FEB. 1, 2016

there are really two nations within Black America. The problem of income inequality, Dr. Wilson concludes, is not between Black America and White America but between black haves and have-nots, something we don’t often discuss in public in an era dominated by a narrative of fear and failure and the claim that racism impacts 42 million people in all the same ways.
Henry_Louis_Gates  African-Americans  Colleges_&_Universities  WEB_Dubois  crisis  disintegration  social_classes  leadership  income_inequality  underclass 
february 2016 by jerryking
Leadership Means Learning to Look Behind the Mask - The New York Times
JAN. 30, 2016 | NYT | By BARBARA MISTICK.

Don't wait until it's too late to solicit feedback. Ms. Mistick was named president and director of Andrew Carnegie’s public library system in Pittsburgh, becoming only the second nonlibrarian to lead the system in over 110 years. She went in knowing that she was considered an outsider and that she would need to call on all her interpersonal and communication skills to navigate her new position. The problem is, the higher your position in an organization, the harder it is to receive honest assessments from the people who work for you, because the balance of authority shifts. ...The search for genuine feedback is increasingly your own responsibility.... In a culture of scarce resources, people had become guarded with their opinions. ....Mistick felt that everyone except her knew what was expected to succeed in “library land.” New jobs always present the challenge of how to read the norms, standards and expectations that aren’t explicitly told to new hires....When seeking input on specific skills, the 360-degree management assessment tool is a great starting place. When you want insights on the most important priorities for personal change, it takes honest conversation with those who know you best at work....We each have more control of our future than we recognize. One of the most powerful ways we can take charge of developing new skills is to ask for feedback.
leadership  women  CEOs  Communicating_&_Connecting  sense-making  performance_reviews  people_skills  Pittsburgh  libraries  anonymity  feedback  first90days  self-improvement  outsiders  tacit_knowledge  insights 
january 2016 by jerryking
Looking for leadership on water - The Globe and Mail
JOHN POMEROY, BOB SANDFORD AND JAMES BRUCE
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Nov. 29, 2015

The federal government has essentially left water issues to the provinces. Yet more than 75 per cent of Canadians live in boundary water basins shared with the United States and most of the rest live in multiprovincial-territorial river basins. The lack of federal leadership ignores the reality of water flow and leaves Canada vulnerable to major water crises that can cripple components of the national economy and are already impoverishing regional economies.

Canada could rapidly start to address its water crisis by implementing flood and drought forecasting and management, and improving water quality and fishery protection and transboundary water management through advice based on enhanced water science and observations.

One way to do this is via a co-operatively formulated, comprehensive Canada Water Agency.
water  leadership  crisis  crossborder  policymaking 
november 2015 by jerryking
Jeffrey Simpson: For Tories, a long list of difficult questions - The Globe and Mail
JEFFREY SIMPSON

The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2015

Having recently been centre stage, the Conservatives might be tempted to figure out quickly how best to return there. Nothing could be more counterproductive.

They should use their prolonged period of being marginal players to figure out what they should say when centre stage truly beckons again, because for now, and for the foreseeable future, the vast majority of Canadians don’t want to hear from or about Conservatives, so bitter is their memory of the Harper years....Leadership puts the proverbial cart before the horse. What the Conservatives need – this is the cart – is to ask themselves at length and in depth: Where did we go wrong? Was it just that we overstayed our welcome and “time for a change” defeated us?

Or was there something deeper about who we were, what we stood for, how we made decisions, how we communicated them to Canadians, how we related to other Canadian institutions such as provinces, the business community, aboriginals, the news media, officers of Parliament, the civil service, non-governmental groups?

Why were we at daggers drawn with scientists, civil servants, “experts,” journalists, the cultural community, even part of the business community (telecommunications, railroads)? Is that where we want to be as Conservatives?

How did we manage to fritter away about a fifth of the support we had secured in the 2011 election by voting day 2015? Why are we by far the least-favoured second-choice party, with the fewest number of people who would consider voting for us? Is it the correct strategy to try for a maximum of 40 per cent of the electors?
Stephen_Harper  Federal_Election_2015  Conservative_Party  introspection  Jeffrey_Simpson  politics  leadership  soul-searching 
october 2015 by jerryking
It’s not too late for Harper to play the statesman - The Globe and Mail
LAWRENCE MARTIN
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Sep. 08, 2015

Why doesn’t Mr. Harper show some of the spirit of the Mandela occasion and appoint a blue-ribbon panel of former prime ministers to advise him on the ongoing Syrian refugee crisis? Given their experience, they could offer sound counsel. It would be an effective way of depoliticizing the issue. That’s what Canadians want. They’ve had their fill of overbearing political partisanship. In the face of a humanitarian crisis, they don’t need more of it.

For the Conservatives, a non-partisan approach makes perfect sense. Humanitarian issues are hardly their forte. They connote soft power. They fit the progressives’ playbook. The Liberals and New Democrats stand to gain.

But thus far, the government has reacted with its customary combative mentality.
Stephen_Harper  Lawrence_Martin  partisanship  Federal_Election_2015  leaders  leadership  statesmen  political_polarization  partisan_warfare  Syrian  refugee  crisis  playbooks 
september 2015 by jerryking
Do effective companies like Amazon really require bad bosses? - The Globe and Mail
DENISE BALKISSOON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Aug. 20, 2015
leaders  leadership  Amazon  restauranteurs 
august 2015 by jerryking
Successful people act quickly when things go wrong - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Aug. 02, 2015

Productivity

Pivot quickly to maximize success
Airplanes are off course 90 per cent of the time but incessantly correct their direction, . Similarly, successful people correct their course quickly when off-kilter. They also set short timelines, have small daily to-do lists and drop stuff that isn’t working. Lifehack.org

Branding

Learn from but don’t live in the past
It’s great to know your company history but senseless to live in the past,Your company’s history is valuable only if customers and prospective clients believe it defines your brand and success, and differentiates you from competitors. If it doesn’t, build a new history.

Leadership

Pre-empt attacks with regular audits
To pre-empt an activist investor’s attack, eliminate financial and operational underperformance. Conduct regular vulnerability audits, looking at factors such as how earnings per share, profit and price-to-earnings ratios in the past 18 months compare with peers. If necessary, create an aggressive turnaround plan. ChiefExecutive.net

Human resources

Ask potential hires where they’ll go next
It sounds weird, but LinkedIn asks potential employees what job they want to have next after they leave the company. Founder Reid Hoffman says it signals the intent to have a huge impact on the individual’s career, helping to develop them for whatever they choose, and invites honesty. Vox.com

Tech tip

Use phone’s camera as portable copier
Productivity blogger Mark Shead recommends using your phone’s camera as a portable copy machine/scanner when on the road, photographing paperwork, train schedules or other information. Many new camera phones have the resolution to provide readable copies. Productivity 501.com
branding  productivity  human_resources  leadership  Harvey_Schachter  character_traits  habits  pre-emption  course_correction  Reid_Hoffman  career_paths  beforemath  overachievers  affirmations  pivots  audits  signals  vulnerabilities  hiring  interviews  high-achieving 
august 2015 by jerryking
Retired Wells Fargo Exec to Help Ex-Convicts - Barron's
By ED FINN
August 1, 2015

As Ludeman sees it, life in Ferguson and many other impoverished U.S. cities has been made far worse by the inability of ex-convicts to adjust to life outside prison. Of the people released from prison, an astounding 77% end up getting arrested again within five years. ...Ludeman was quick to educate himself on the social and economic costs of America’s burgeoning state and federal prison population, which now numbers 1.6 million, up from 300,000 in 1980. One reason the U.S. economy has been slow to recover in recent years is that so many Americans have prison records and therefore find it nearly impossible to get jobs. This is largely due to laws passed since 1980 requiring mandatory sentences, particularly for drug-related offenses. By one estimate, 7.7 million people in the U.S. have served time in prison.

Before thinking about Project Cope, says Ludeman, “I did not realize the devastating impact to individuals, families, and communities, who are literally annihilated by mass incarceration.”

Without question, the harsher sentencing laws of the past three decades have taken a proportionately greater toll on African-Americans. While African-Americans make up 13% of the overall U.S. population, they account for 38% of prison inmates. Studies have shown that when a white person and an African-American with similar criminal histories are charged with the same type of crime, the chances of the African-American going to prison are far higher than for the white defendant. One study indicated that young African-American males have a one-in-three chance of going to prison at some point in their lives, versus one-in-six for Hispanics and one-in-17 for whites
Second_Acts  nonprofit  CEOs  leadership  serving_others  justice_system  penal_institutions  prisons  incarceration  racial_disparities  African-Americans 
august 2015 by jerryking
The enduring leadership of Charleston’s mayor - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
CHARLESTON, S.C. — The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jul. 01, 2015
Marcus_Gee  leaders  leadership  mayoral  Charleston_shootings  Charleston  South_Carolina 
july 2015 by jerryking
Black Church Is Target Again for Deadly Strike at the Heart - The New York Times
By RACHEL L. SWARNS and CAMPBELL ROBERTSON JUNE 19, 2015

in those years after Emancipation is what the African-American scholar W. E. B. Du Bois and others have described as the “first social institution fully controlled by black men in America.” Black churches ran schools, offered burial assistance and served as clearinghouses for information about jobs, social happenings and politics. More than just spiritual homes, they embodied their communities’ growing political aspirations.

And before long, they became targets.

In 1963, a bomb tore through the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., killing four girls. Black churches have long been a site of racist attacks.

In the fall of 1870, as the Ku Klux Klan battled to return African-Americans to subservience, nearly every black church in Tuskegee, Ala., was engulfed in flames. Ninety-three years later, as the civil rights movement gained momentum, a bomb blast killed four young girls in a black church in Birmingham, Ala., that was a well-known meeting place for movement leaders....In the 19th century, these centers of worship, small and large, rural and urban, stone and ramshackle, became vital community engines. More than 100 of the first black men to be elected to legislative office in the United States were ministers, according to Eric Foner, a Columbia University history professor known for his expertise in the Reconstruction era.

During segregation, churches became places where black men and women found leadership opportunities denied to them by white society.
clearinghouses  Charleston_shootings  African-Americans  churches  Civil_War  KKK  institutions  social_institutions  history  violence  Reconstruction  segregation  leadership  leadership_development  W.E.B._Du_Bois  19th_century 
june 2015 by jerryking
Three generations of de Gaspé Beaubien family give back to Canada - The Globe and Mail
ROY MACGREGOR
GATINEAU, QUE. — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 05, 2015

Working with Ottawa Riverkeeper’s capable executive director, Meredith Brown, the partnership last weekend hosted a summit, AquaHacking 2015, in a hotel just across the river from Parliament Hill. With the help of co-sponsor IBM, they held a “hackathon” and gave out $20,000 in prizes to computer wizards who came up with the best applications to help gather data on the health of the river. Some came from as far away as California to compete.
philanthropy  family  family-owned_businesses  water  family_business  public_service  Quebec  civics  youth  leadership  giving  serving_others 
june 2015 by jerryking
The test of true political leadership is to risk change - The Globe and Mail
BRIAN MULRONEY
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, May. 28 2015

The most essential ingredient for any “Big Idea,” however, is leadership.

Leadership that not only anticipates the need for change but is determined to implement change. Not in pursuit of popularity but to serve the national interest.

The test of true leadership hinges on judgments between risk and reward.

Change of any kind requires risk, political risk. It can and will generate unpopularity from those who oppose change. The choice for Canada or the United Kingdom in a fast-changing global environment is either to adapt quickly and take advantage of the changes happening or watch from the sidelines....As Reinhold Niebuhr reminded us: “Nothing worth doing is completed in our lifetime; therefore, we must be saved by hope. Nothing fine or beautiful or good makes complete sense in any immediate context of history; therefore, we must be saved by faith.”(jk: the importance of having a long-term vision & exhibiting faith in pursuing it).

It is in this perspective that great and controversial questions of public policy must be considered.

History tends to focus on the builders, the deciders, the leaders – because they are the men and women whose contributions have shaped the destiny of their nations, here and around the world.

From the bloodied sands of Afghanistan to the snows and waters of the High Arctic, the Canada of 50 years from now will be defined by the leadership we are given today.
Brian_Mulroney  speeches  Oxford  leadership  politicians  Cold_War  9/11  NAFTA  '80s  history  leaders  risks  transformational  courage  political_risk  fast-changing  free-trade  public_policy 
may 2015 by jerryking
Britain resigns as a world power
May 21, 2015 |The Washington Post | Fareed Zakaria
"I was struck by just how parochial it has become. After an extraordinary 300-year run, Britain has essentially resigned as a global power.

Over the next few years, Britain’s army will shrink to about 80,000."... Why does this matter? Because on almost all global issues, Britain has a voice that is intelligent, engaged and forward-looking. It wants to strengthen and uphold today’s international system — one based on the free flow of ideas, goods and services around the world, one that promotes individual rights and the rule of law.

This is not an accident. Britain essentially created the world we live in. In his excellent book “God and Gold,” Walter Russell Mead points out that in the 16th century many countries were poised to advance economically and politically — Northern Italy’s city-states, the Hanseatic League, the Low Countries, France, Spain. But Britain managed to edge out the others, becoming the first great industrial economy and the modern world’s first superpower. It colonized and shaped countries and cultures from Australia to India to Africa to the Western Hemisphere, including of course, its settlements in North America. Had Spain or Germany become the world’s leading power, things would look very different today.
geopolitics  E.U.  foreign_policy  internationalism  international_relations  middle-powers  parochialism  Fareed_Zakaria  Walter_Russell_Mead  books  United_Kingdom  London  cutbacks  BBC  cost-cutting  cosmopolitan  David_Cameron  leadership  globalization  retreats  superpowers  international_system  forward_looking  rule_of_law  drawdowns  industrial_economy  punch-above-its-weight 
may 2015 by jerryking
In business and government, think differently - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL SABIA
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, May. 16 2015

here’s the paradox. At a time when creativity is relentlessly driving change in so much of our world, many would limit governments to managing their way through, rather than working with others to solve problems.

It started in the 1980s and ’90s, when we decided governments needed to become “more like businesses,” adopting the metrics – and vocabulary – of corporations. Citizens became “clients.” Compliance replaced creativity.

The job of government was defined in terms of its “efficiency,” and the emphasis was placed on the minimal “must do” instead of the aspirational “can be.”

Of course, governments have to demonstrate good stewardship of public resources. But if all they do is count change, it limits their ability to effect change. The fact is when big problems arise – whether it’s a financial crisis like 2008 or a tragedy like Lac-Mégantic – people’s first instinct is to look to government for a solution.

Yet opinion researchers tell us that people are increasingly disappointed with our collective response to the issues that matter most: income inequality, health care for the elderly, climate change and so on....It’s about different government. This is about government moving away from a manager’s obsession with doing things better to a leader’s focus on doing better things. Think of fostering innovation, being open to new ideas, encouraging experimentation, rewarding risk-taking. And, frankly, accepting failure as a condition precedent to success.
Michael_Sabia  CDPQ  thinking  CEOs  innovation  leadership  experimentation  risk-taking  failure  trial_&_error  government  public_sector  open_source  disappointment  business  stewardship  compliance  replaced  creativity  efficiencies  effectiveness  think_differently 
may 2015 by jerryking
Feeling uncertain, CEO? Better go on the attack - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, May. 05 2015

Taking control of uncertainty is the fundamental leadership challenge of our time … ” he writes in The Attacker’s Advantage. “The advantage now goes to those who create change, not just learn to live with it. Instead of waiting and reacting, such leaders immerse themselves in the ambiguities of the external environment, sort through them before things are settled and known, set a path, and steer the organization decisively onto it.”
Harvey_Schachter  Ram_Charan  uncertainty  algorithms  mathematics  data  management_consulting  anomalies  change  Jack_Welch  books  gurus  offense  data_driven  leadership  ambiguities  offensive_tactics 
may 2015 by jerryking
Real leadership is about transformation - The Globe and Mail
BRIAN MULRONEY
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, May. 04 2015

In his seminal work on leadership, James MacGregor Burns segregates “transactional” from “transforming” leadership. He writes that it is the transforming leader who “raises the level of human conduct of both leader and led … who responds to fundamental hopes and expectations and who may transcend and even seek to reconstruct the political system rather than simply operate within it.”

Time is the ally of leaders who placed the defence of principle ahead of the pursuit of popularity. And history has little time for the marginal roles played by the carpers and complainers and less for their opinions. History tends to focus on the builders, the deciders, the leaders – in education, health care, science, business, the arts as well as politics – because they are the men and women whose contributions have shaped the destiny of their nations.

Theodore Roosevelt had courageous leaders in mind when he spoke at La Sorbonne and said: “It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood ... who spends himself in a worthy cause, and who, at the best, knows in the end the triumphs of high achievement and who, at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.”

In fact, “transforming leadership” – leadership that makes a significant difference in the life of a nation – recognizes that political capital is acquired to be spent in great causes for one’s country.
St._FX  convocation  Brian_Mulroney  leaders  leadership  speeches  commencement  Theodore_Roosevelt  Communicating_&_Connecting  transformational  courage  political_capital  Great_Man_Theory_of_History  doers 
may 2015 by jerryking
A fighter for immigration, inclusion and diversity - The Globe and Mail
RICHARD BLACKWELL
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Apr. 17 2015,

After years of running the poverty-fighting Maytree Foundation, last fall Ratna Omidvar was named head of the new Global Diversity Exchange housed at the Ted Rogers School of Management at Toronto’s Ryerson University. The GDX, as she calls it, will do research and exchange information about diversity and the inclusion of immigrants and visible minorities – not just in Canada but all over the world.

It is essentially a “think-and-do tank,”...the GDX will tap into the great minds who have studied immigration and settlement, while sharing concrete strategies and experiences that have worked effectively.

While national governments function as the gatekeepers for immigration – letting people in or keeping them out – it is local efforts, usually at the city level, that make the difference in getting immigrants to prosper, she said.
immigration  women  diversity  Ryerson  leaders  immigrants  leadership  networking  boards_&_directors_&_governance  Maytree  talent_pipelines  under-representation  Ratna_Omidvar  Toronto  cities  think_tanks 
april 2015 by jerryking
Can-Do Lee Kuan Yew - NYTimes.com
MARCH 23, 2015
Continue reading the main story

Roger Cohen

The measure of that achievement is that the ingredients of disaster abounded in Singapore, a country that is “not supposed to exist and cannot exist,” as Lee said in a 2007 interview with The New York Times. “We don’t have the ingredients of a nation,” he noted, “the elementary factors: a homogeneous population, common language, common culture and common destiny.” Instead, it had a combustible ethnic and religious hodgepodge of Chinese, Malays and Indians gathered in a city-state of no natural resources....The fact that the elements for cataclysm exist does not mean that cataclysm is inevitable. Lee demonstrated this in an age where the general cacophony, and the need to manage and spin every political minute, makes statesmanship ever more elusive. The determining factor is leadership. What defines leadership above all is conviction, discipline in the pursuit of a goal, adaptability in the interest of the general good, and far-sightedness.

Lee’s only religion was pragmatism, of which religion (as generally understood) is the enemy, because, to some adherents, it offers revealed truths that are fact-resistant. Any ideology that abhors facts is problematic. (If you believe land is yours because it was deeded to you in the Bible, for example, but other people live there and have for centuries, you have an issue pregnant with violence.) Lee had one basic yardstick for policy: Does it work? It was the criterion of a forward-looking man for whom history was instructive but not imprisoning. He abhorred victimhood (an excuse for sloppy thinking and nationalist delusion) and corruption. He prized opportunity, meritocracy, the work ethic of the immigrant and education.
authoritarianism  city-states  far-sightedness  leaders  leadership  Lee_Kuan_Yew  nation_builders  obituaries  Roger_Cohen  Singapore  Southeast_Asia  statesmen  tributes  victimhood  work_ethic 
march 2015 by jerryking
Toronto’s school board isn’t just troubled. It’s rotten - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 16 2015

It is just as hard to imagine how a government that balks at breaking up a ridiculous and wholly unnecessary commercial monopoly such as the Beer Store is going to undertake a root-and-branch reform of the country’s biggest school board. Yet that is what is called for – nothing less.

The problem at the TDSB goes far beyond a few trustees with swollen heads. The rot at the board is deeper than that. Teachers’ unions and custodians’ unions have far too much power, individual teachers and principals far too little. The dead hand of the education bureaucracy stifles innovation and creativity.
TDSB  education  mediocrity  Marcus_Gee  mismanagement  schools  performance  bureaucracies  dysfunction  reform  root-and-branch  unions  autonomy  leadership 
january 2015 by jerryking
From War Room to Boardroom: Leadership Lessons From Two Generals - WSJ
Dec. 8, 2014 | WSJ |

Start to build relationships so that you have something to fall back on when you disagree on the issues.

What leadership lessons should we take from the American experience in Iraq and Afghanistan?

GEN. MCCHRYSTAL: The first thing is we didn’t do due diligence before we went in. We didn’t understand the problem to the depth that we needed to. We didn’t take the time to do it, and we didn’t nurture the experts.

If we gathered all the Pashtun and Arabic speakers in the U.S. military, we could probably fit them on this stage. And yet, after World War II began, after Pearl Harbor, we trained more than 5,000 military members to speak Japanese. We just haven’t made that level of effort.

The other thing is we go at this with different parts of our government. Every agency wants to help but they want to protect their equities, and you can’t do a complex endeavor like this unless you can build a truly integrated team in which everybody is focused.
leadership  lessons_learned  shared_consciousness  operational_tempo  Stanley_McChrystal  teams  NSC  security_&_intelligence  generalship  ISIS  al_Qaeda  Taliban  learning_organizations  adaptability  decision_making  speed  languages  Arabic  Pashtun  relationships 
december 2014 by jerryking
Canada’s stake in Perry Bellegarde - The Globe and Mail
KEN COATES
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Dec. 12 2014
aboriginals  leadership 
december 2014 by jerryking
How to make the leap to the VP’s seat - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL SHERAR
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Dec. 03 2014

Like everything that is worthwhile doing, a promotion to VP requires hard work, lengthy preparation and thoughtfulness. Challenge yourself to view things from a higher perspective starting from how your own work is helping to drive a broader organizational strategy and how it can be leveraged to support other parts of the organization. Take this type of thinking to the interview and then into your new role as a VP and you can help your organization scale new heights.
howto  executive_management  movingonup  leadership  interviews  hard_work  companywide 
december 2014 by jerryking
Why women shouldn’t avoid centre stage - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
The Globe and Mail (includes correction)
Published Sunday, Nov. 30 2014
women  leadership  howto  leaders  Harvey_Schachter 
december 2014 by jerryking
Exit interview: The ROM’s departing CEO and the museum’s challenges - The Globe and Mail
JAMES ADAMS
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Nov. 28 2014

This was the hope: That after the $300-million convulsion known as Renaissance ROM, Janet Carding would, as the Royal Ontario Museum’s director and CEO effective Sept. 13, 2010, begin to re-establish the Toronto museum as a museum. Her predecessor, William Thorsell, had spent most of his 10 years bringing to fruition the bricks-and-mortar overhaul of the Grande Olde Dame on the southwest corner of Queen’s Park and Bloor Street West – an overhaul brazenly exemplified by the jagged thrusts of the Michael Lee-Chin Crystal designed by starchitect Daniel Libeskind.

With the Crystal, Thorsell made the ROM a talking point, a lightning rod for debate, a rude, not-to-be-ignored presence on Toronto’s topography. It would be Carding’s job to take all that attention and, through a judicious mix of programming, exhibitions and education, translate it into visitors, be they visitors physically accessing the museum’s six million artifacts and 40 galleries through the new front door on Bloor, or virtually, through digital media.

This is the reality: Carding, it was announced this week, is to leave the ROM in March, a full five months and a bit before the expiration of the five-year contract she signed with the museum’s board of trustees in 2010
exits  CEOs  ROM  museums  Toronto  leadership  challenges  William_Thorsell  landmarks  iconic  Queen’s_Park 
november 2014 by jerryking
The Unifying Leader - NYTimes.com
NOV. 24, 2014
Continue reading the main storyContinue reading the main story
RECENT COMMENTS

Richard A. Petro 4 minutes ago
Dear Mr. Brooks,You might have started your column with a quote, "I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him." Shakespeare.Okay, so Mr. Obama...
Carl 7 minutes ago
If Mr. Brooks wants us to believe that the current political environment invites collaboration and calls for a collaborative leader, he...
kll 9 minutes ago
Mr. Brooks - Your column would make rather more sense if you were more specific, i.e. name names (who has been such a leader and in what...
SEE ALL COMMENTS WRITE A COMMENT

David Brooks
David_Brooks  leaders  leadership  Obama 
november 2014 by jerryking
The Reluctant Leader - NYTimes.com
SEPT. 11, 2014
Continue reading the main story

David Brooks
David_Brooks  leaders  leadership  Obama 
september 2014 by jerryking
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

Copy this bookmark:





to read