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jerryking : leadership_development   52

What if you’re not chosen for a ‘hi-po’ programme?
AUGUST 10, 2019 | Financial Times | Elizabeth Uviebinené.

Organisations naturally need to have a leadership pipeline through which they identify, develop and promote high potential (hi-po) employees who can lead the company in the future. However, given that most will not be selected, it is inevitable that some talented individuals will feel overlooked.

Organisations devote significant resources to these “chosen few”. They give a few individuals privileged access to training, exposure to decision makers and mentorship, all of which helps propel them towards the coveted top spot..... such programmes are invitation only. But how to get invited on to them is usually a closely guarded secret. Sometimes it is a formal process, but at other times it is at the discretion of senior management....So what happens when you are not chosen for a “fast track” programme? It is easy to start questioning your capabilities and even aspirations. It can be a motivation killer at first, leaving you feeling undervalued.....Harvard Business Review data suggests companies are bad at correctly identifying high-potential employees....The best organisations build a culture that nurtures high-potential individuals whether or not there is a formal talent development programme in place. This is especially true for women and minorities in the workplace who remain under-represented at every level in the corporate talent pipeline....New research from Northwestern University in the US suggests that early career hurdles actually help spur future success. The study showed that experiencing setbacks at the start of a career has a powerful and opposing effect: “Individuals with near misses systematically outperformed those with near wins in the long run.”

Early success does not always predict future success. Longer term, what you do when faced with disappointment usually determines whether or not you have what it takes to have a successful career....If you just missed out on a talent development programme, do not be disheartened. It leaves open the possibility of proving yourself on your own terms, rather than getting boxed into one company’s view of what leadership looks like.
career_paths  fast_track  HBR  high-achieving  invitation-only  leadership  leadership_development  Managing_Your_Career  mentoring  middle_management  movingonup  selection_processes  strivers  talent  talent_management  talent_pipelines  talent_spotting  talent_scouting  training  up-and-comers 
august 2019 by jerryking
Book Pins Corporate Greed on a Lust Bred at Harvard - The New York Times
Andrew Ross Sorkin
DEALBOOK APRIL 10, 2017

the Harvard Business School in Cambridge, Mass... produces a disproportionate number of the nation’s business leaders.

“The Golden Passport,” by the veteran business journalist Duff McDonald, is a richly reported indictment of the school as a leading reason that corporate America is disdained by much of the country.

“The Harvard Business School became (and remains) so intoxicated with its own importance that it blithely assumed away one of the most important questions it could ask, which was whether the capitalist system it was uniquely positioned to help improve was designed properly for the long term,”
HBS  capitalism  greed  Andrew_Sorkin  books  mission-driven  leaders  leadership_development 
april 2017 by jerryking
Black Church Is Target Again for Deadly Strike at the Heart - The New York Times
By RACHEL L. SWARNS and CAMPBELL ROBERTSON JUNE 19, 2015

in those years after Emancipation is what the African-American scholar W. E. B. Du Bois and others have described as the “first social institution fully controlled by black men in America.” Black churches ran schools, offered burial assistance and served as clearinghouses for information about jobs, social happenings and politics. More than just spiritual homes, they embodied their communities’ growing political aspirations.

And before long, they became targets.

In 1963, a bomb tore through the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., killing four girls. Black churches have long been a site of racist attacks.

In the fall of 1870, as the Ku Klux Klan battled to return African-Americans to subservience, nearly every black church in Tuskegee, Ala., was engulfed in flames. Ninety-three years later, as the civil rights movement gained momentum, a bomb blast killed four young girls in a black church in Birmingham, Ala., that was a well-known meeting place for movement leaders....In the 19th century, these centers of worship, small and large, rural and urban, stone and ramshackle, became vital community engines. More than 100 of the first black men to be elected to legislative office in the United States were ministers, according to Eric Foner, a Columbia University history professor known for his expertise in the Reconstruction era.

During segregation, churches became places where black men and women found leadership opportunities denied to them by white society.
clearinghouses  Charleston_shootings  African-Americans  churches  Civil_War  KKK  institutions  social_institutions  history  violence  Reconstruction  segregation  leadership  leadership_development  W.E.B._Du_Bois  19th_century 
june 2015 by jerryking
How to leave your company better off than you found it - The Globe and Mail
VINCE MOLINARO

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Jan. 02 2014

How can you ensure that you are leaving your organization in better shape than when you took the reins? True leaders typically take the following steps:

1. Commit to making things better every single day – in ways that position your organization for both short- and long-term success. Don’t be a bystander and watch problems fester; have the courage to tackle them head on.

2. Guard the interests of the whole organization. Don’t just focus on your own department or self-interests.

3. Try to anticipate threats that can put your organization at risk. Stay plugged into what you hear from customers or employees close to customers. This is often where the early warning signs exist.
4. Build strong relationships both inside and outside your organization.
5. Develop an unyielding commitment to building a strong culture that drives high employee engagement.
6. Develop leaders for the future.
legacies  leadership  RBC  Gord_Nixon  stewardship  companywide  leaders  CEOs  employee_engagement  organizational_culture  leadership_development  relationships  anticipating  threats  thinking_holistically  long-term  short-term  incrementalism  nobystanders  warning_signs 
january 2014 by jerryking
Is the Black church in the Black community?
July 31 2013| Share News | Posted by Lennox Farrell.
Does Toronto’s Black community have any organizational base from which to respond to our social needs?

Which, in particular brings me back to the initial question, is there any institution in our community with the resources and the legitimacy to step up and step forward?

An institution assisting in developing leadership that consults. Leadership that embraces. Leadership that is forthright with the politicians and those who carry status?

Leadership that speaks with the institutional knowledge of what is past and who is present. Leadership that speaks to solutions and not to posturings. Because, if Toronto knows anything, it knows how to make a fig-leaf look like a fig-tree. It knows how to tire you out, calling meetings to call other meetings…

We live in a city and in a time that is at a watershed regarding racism and its impact on our youth. Employment and self-employment require training and resources, yes. These require even more: access and opportunity. In other words, these require a level playing field. Because access and opportunity is not about what you know, but about who you know; with whom you socialize in your church, club, family, golf-course, neighbourhood.

The only effective response to this (anti-Black racism) must come from institutions that are communal, that are resourced, legitimate, and have the wisdom and honour to unite, not divide the community from religious turf wars for paying memberships. Our community and our youth in particular, need back-up from the front.

What we urgently need is for individuals in leadership to be energized. What we need and before the next elections – municipal, provincial, federal – is greater and more substantive interaction with the most marginalized among us; with communities who might never attend church; who will not be in the choir; who might not give donations. Then, call together as many of the organizations and individuals who will volunteer to work and to work wisely under honourable leadership.
African_Canadians  institutional_knowledge  leadership  leadership_development  institutions  institution-building  networking  SIU  strategic_thinking  Toronto  turning_points 
august 2013 by jerryking
Good leadership is Africa’s missing ingredient
Mar. 04 2013 | The Globe and Mail |Robert Rotberg.

Because so many of sub-Saharan Africa’s 49 countries are preinstitutional, and not yet fully nations, leaders matter immensely, more than they do in the developed world. Leaders call the shots, as they have in most sub-Saharan African countries since independence in the 1960s. They set the ethical tone. If leaders are greedy, as many are, their citizens become more cynical and the quality of governmental discourse suffers enormously.

In Africa and elsewhere, governments are expected by their subjects to provide security and safety, rule of law, open political participation, sustainable economic prospects and a large measure of human development (educational and health opportunities and services).

In states where political institutions are weak, legislatures are subordinate to executives, the media are barely free and the judiciary is subordinate rather than independent, the manner in which leaders behave as presidents and prime ministers is much more decisive than it might be in a fully-formed nation where political institutions work and constrain overweening political executives.

A majority of the countries of sub-Saharan Africa are still controlled by men who are motivated not by what they can do for their people but by what their people can do for them. Such leaders exist to prey on their own citizens, to extract from the body politic corrupt rents and other privileges that benefit the ruler and ruling class, their families, and their cliques or lineages.
leadership  leaders  leadership_development  Africa  CIDA  capacity-building  weak_states  judiciary  institutions  greed  rent-seeking  institutional_integrity  failed_states  ruling_classes  sub-Saharan_Africa  Non-Integrating_Gap  autocrats  misgovernance  predatory_practices  developing_countries  independent_judiciary 
march 2013 by jerryking
Feminists need to challenge themselves, too
Mar. 04 2013 |The Globe and Mail | by NAOMI WOLF.
[dissatisfaction = challenging oneself = self-challenge]
Ms. Sandberg is seeking not just to raise consciousness, but to forge a social movement. She wants her “Lean In” circles – all-women spaces to be supported by corporate workplaces – to teach women negotiation, public speaking and other skills, all merged with upbeat collective support....the opportunity to learn and practise speaking and negotiating skills is hardly inconsequential for women’s advancement... Institutional battles to redress women’s underrepresentation in land ownership, politics, and so on must be coupled with individualized leadership and skills training for women, ideally in an atmosphere of mutual support in which women learn from peers how to achieve and enlarge their own goals.
Sheryl_Sandberg  glass_ceilings  Facebook  social_movements  women  self-scrutiny  mentoring  movingonup  life_skills  workplaces  self-promotion  land_ownership  leadership_development  consciousness-raising  feminism  dissatisfaction  under-representation 
march 2013 by jerryking
The Broadwell Recognition | Daniel W. Drezner
indecorous

the David Petraeus/Paula Broadwell story is the ultimate pundit Rorschach Test. Whatever axe one had to grind against the foreign policy community prior to the story breaking, Petraeus and Broadwell merely sharpens it. It’s evidence about the sexism and double-standards at play in Washington! It shows the insularity and kiss-assedness of the foreign policy community!! It shows that COIN doesn’t work, or that Petraeus was a big phony!!

....a lesson that can be drawn from this for those young, impressionistic aspirants to positions of foreign policy influence......do not, under any circumstances, think of a Ph.D. as merely a box to be checked on the way to power and influence in Washington....... Petraeus both benefited from and propagated the desire to develop "officer-intellectuals" within the military........West Point’s social science department, where Petraeus had taught in the mid-1980s. The department, known as “Sosh,” was founded just after World War II by a visionary ex-cadet and Rhodes Scholar named George A. “Abe” Lincoln. Toward the end of the war, as the senior planning aide to Army Chief of Staff Gen. George Marshall, Lincoln realized that the Army needed to breed a new type of officer to help the nation meet its new global responsibilities in the postwar era. This new officer, he wrote to a colleague, should have “at least three heads—one political, one economic, and one military.” He took a demotion, from brigadier general to colonel, so he could return to West Point and create a curriculum “to improve the so-called Army mind” in just this way: a social science department, encouraging critical thinking, even occasionally dissent.

Lincoln also set up a program allowing cadets with high scores in Sosh classes to go study at a civilian graduate school, with West Point paying the tuition. In exchange, the cadets, after earning their doctorates, would come back and teach for at least three years. Once they fulfilled that obligation, Lincoln would use his still-considerable connections in Washington to get them choice assignments in the Pentagon, the State Department, the White House, a foreign embassy, or a prestigious command post......some scholar-officers rate as being among the best that the military has to offer, and offer a necessary bridge between the scholarly and martial worlds. On the other hand, some of them are there precisely because they see the Ph.D. as a ticket to be punched on the way to something greater. And these are the ones who will usually flail about miserably.......Here's the thing about sub-par doctoral students: 95% of them will not earn a Ph.D. — and most of the rest who do get it will only have done so by finding the most pliant dissertation committee alive. Ambition and intelligence can get someone through college and a professional degree. It can even get someone through Ph.D.-level coursework. What it can’t do is produce an above-the-bar dissertation......For people who have succeeded at pretty much everything in life to that point, a Ph.D. seems like just another barrier to transcend. It’s not. Unless you are able to simultaneously love and critically dissect your subject matter, unless you thrive in an environment where people are looking forward to picking apart your most cherished ideas, you won’t finish......As someone who has advised readers on the relative merits of getting a Ph.D., it’s worth pointing out — repeatedly — that getting a Ph.D. is not for everyone. If there isn’t an idea or a question that truly animates you, if you think of a Ph.D. as merely a ticket to be punched, then know the following: you are looking at a half-decade of misery with nothing to show for it in the end except a terminal masters degree.
academia  Colleges_&_Universities  David_Petraeus  fast_track  high-achieving  invitation-only  KSG  leadership  leadership_development  lessons_learned  overambitious  Paula_Broadwell  PhDs  scandals  scholars  scholar-officers  West_Point 
november 2012 by jerryking
Eight Principles of Strategic Wealth Management
August 09, 2006 | Knowledge@Wharton | by Stuart E. Lucas.
1. Take charge and do it early.
2. Align family and business interests around wealth-building goals and strategies.
3. Create a culture of accountability.
4. Capitalize on your family's combined resources.
5. Delegate, empower, and respect independence.
6. Diversify but focus.
7. Err on the side of simplicity where possible.
8. Develop future family leaders with strong wealth management skills.
wealth_management  rules_of_the_game  Wharton  personal_finance  wealth_creation  accountability  strategic_thinking  leadership_development  simplicity  JCK  business_interests  family_interests  diversification  focus  Michael_McDerment  aligned_interests 
august 2012 by jerryking
What Makes a Top Executive?
1983 | Psychology Today | by Morgan W.McCall, Jr. and Michael M. Lombardo.
Executives, like the rest of us, are a patchwork of strengths and weaknesses....The fatal flaws of executives who failed to live up to their potential.

1. Insensitive to others: abrasive, intimidating style.
2. Cold, aloof, arrogant
3. Betrayal of Trust—failure to meet commitments.
4. Overly ambitious—plays politics, pushes too hard to get ahead.
5. Failure to handle specific performance problems—failure to handle problems then not admit the problem, try to cover up or shift blame.
6. Overmanaging: unable to delegate or build a team.
7. Unable to select and develop an effective staff.
8. Unable to think broadly or strategically—too much attention to detail and minor technical problems.
9. Unable to adapt to a boss with a different style.
10. Overdependence on one’s boss or mentor.

These flaws matter because:
1. Strengths become weaknesses
2. Deficiencies eventually matter
3. Success goes to their heads
4. Events conspire

Part of handling adversity lies in knowing what not to do. Know which behavioural patterns will colleagues and superiors consider intolerable...Seek diversity in the forms of success.
executive_management  CEOs  movingonup  career_ending_moves  leadership  listening  Myers-Briggs  managing_people  EQ  Managing_Your_Career  personality_types/traits  leadership_development  character_traits  strengths  weaknesses  people_skills 
july 2012 by jerryking
Expeditionary Leaders, CINCs, and Chairmen Shaping Air Force Officers for Leadership Roles in the Twenty-First Century
Winter 2000| Aerospace Power Journal | DR. JAMES M. SMITH.

Editorial Abstract: In this article, APJ is honored to play a part in announcing to the Air Force the Developing Aerospace Leaders project. The twenty-first-century international environment suggests that our aerospace leaders may need to be more skilled in strategic thinking than their predecessors. How should the Air Force change the currently stovepiped career-and-assignment structure to develop strategy-savvy officers with experience broad enough to lead in an uncertain future? Rising to the challenge of producing such strategist-leaders, the Air Force chief of staff initiated the Developing Aerospace Leaders project in October 1999. Dr. Smith, a member of that team, outlines some of the challenges and proposes one possible solution requiring a substantially changed system of professional military education with specially selected “strategist grooming” assignments for its graduates.
USAF  strategic_thinking  leadership_development  21st._century  military_academies 
july 2012 by jerryking
The Sunshine Warrior - NYTimes.com
By BILL KELLER September 22, 2002

His inclination to act derives, too, from his analytical style, a residue, perhaps, of the mathematician he started out to be. In almost any discussion, he tends to be the one focusing on the most often overlooked variable in decision making, the cost of not acting. ....the tensions between State and Defense are rooted in starkly different views of how America should deal with the world. The State Department tends to see the world as a set of problems to be handled, using the tools of professional diplomacy and striving for international consensus. This Defense Department tends to define leadership as more (in the Pentagon's favorite buzzword of the moment) ''forward leaning,'' including a willingness to act unilaterally if need be and to employ muscle. Rumsfeld and Cheney, who have been friends since the Nixon administration, are visceral advocates of this more assertive view, but Wolfowitz is its theorist -- its Kissinger, as one admirer put it. ...Dennis Ross went to work for Wolfowitz shortly after writing a paper trashing the work of Team B. ''What I always found in him that separated him from everybody else on that side of the political spectrum is not that he didn't have predispositions, but that he was much more open, much more intellectually open, to different kinds of interpretations,'' Ross says....''In the end, it has to come down to a careful weighing of things we can't know with precision, the costs of action versus the costs of inaction, the costs of action now versus the costs of action later.''
U.S._military  leadership  leadership_development  U.S._Army  military_academies  red_teams  Dennis_Ross  Paul_Wolfowitz  cost_of_inaction  Pentagon  U.S._State_Department  diplomacy  consensus  interpretation 
may 2012 by jerryking
Iowa: The Harvard of Coaching - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 21, 2011 | Wall Street Journal | By JARED DIAMOND

Iowa: The Harvard of Coaching
How Hawkeye Great Hayden Fry Raised a Bumper Crop of Coaches; The 'Bell Cow' Theory.
football  Colleges_&_Universities  athletes_&_athletics  coaching  leadership  leadership_development 
december 2011 by jerryking
HR getting short shrift: study
May 30, 2007 | The Globe and Mail. pg. C.1 | Virginia Galt.

"Over the past decade, there has been much talk about HR becoming a strategic business partner within the company, but we find HR is still primarily viewed as a cost centre or administrative function," Margot Thom, a partner with Deloitte Canada, said in releasing the report..."When business executives talk about HR, they focus on things like benefits, performance evaluations and HR operating efficiency. But when those same executives talk about 'people issues,' they focus on strategic challenges, such as talent management, work force productivity and leadership development - and in many cases the HR function isn't even mentioned," Ms. [Margot Thom] said, adding organizations are leaving HR "out of the loop" at their peril.
ProQuest  Virginia_Galt  human_resources  Deloitte  Octothorpe_Software  talent_management  productivity  leadership_development 
november 2011 by jerryking
How GE Teaches Teams to Lead Change
January 009 | HBR | by Steven Prokesch.

Idea in Brief

Management development programs that focus on teaching and inspiring individuals to apply new approaches have a fundamental flaw: If other members of an individual’s team have not taken the course, they may resist efforts to change.

The antidote to this problem is training intact management teams.

When managers go through a program together, they emerge with a consensus view of the opportunities and problems and how best to attack them. The result: faster and more effective change.
HBR  GE  teaching  teams  change  change_management  shared_consciousness  shared_experiences  Jeffrey_Immelt  training  leadership_development  innovation  growth 
november 2011 by jerryking
Teaching Young Women to Brag
May 9,2007| WALL STREET Journal|Victoria E. Knight

Reference [Victoria E. Knight, Teaching Young Woman to Brag, WALL ST.J., May 9,2007, at B3 ]

In turn, women of Wall Street are joining groups like High Water Women out of a desire to go beyond checkbook philanthropy....Ms. Klaus explains the importance of framing accomplishments in an engaging way. This means telling a story that highlights accomplishments, passions and interests without descending into a boring laundry list of achievements blighted by overuse of the word Ì`.
advice  mentoring  disadvantages  leadership  women  networking  self-promotion  New_York_City  public_speaking  leadership_development  finance  Wall_Street  philanthropy  storytelling  coaching  praise  daughters  girls 
november 2011 by jerryking
African Leadership Academy - ALA Founder Fred Swaniker Speaks at TED Global Conference in Tanzania
to sustain and accelerate Africa’s development, however, we must be more systematic about cultivating these leaders. We must be proactive about increasing the number of individuals who can conceive of important new ideas and implement them.

And so was born the idea for African Leadership Academy. Our goal is to identify young people throughout the continent—125 each and every year—that we believe have the potential to develop and implement important new ideas that can transform Africa. We will bring these young people to the Academy for 2 years in a full-time residential program, as a sort of “Rhodes Scholarship” for Africa’s most promising young leaders. This will begin a life-long process of nurturing these amazing people to bring about the change that our beautiful continent so desperately needs.
leaders  Africa  African  leadership_development  ideas  systematic_approaches  transformational  young_people 
september 2011 by jerryking
From the Classroom to the Boardroom
Nov 15, 2007 | Diverse Issues in Higher Education | Nealy,
Michelle J. To be considered for TMCF's HBCU Talent Sourcing Program,
students must have a recommendation from a college counselor and a
minimum 3.0 GPA. Recruits usually exceed these requirements, and the
average GPA is 3.48, according to TMCF's Web site. Thurgood Marshall
recruits are advised to carry an air of professionalism everywhere they
go. For Thurgood Marshall internships and conferences, a dress code of
business attire is strictly enforced. Students are also asked to refrain
from wearing braids.

"Our recruits have strong leadership and communication skills. They are
bright and assertive as well as active on their campuses and in their
communities. Our partners are always very pleased," says Ashley.
Colleges_&_Universities  HBCUs  ProQuest  talent  leadership_development  internships  Thurgood_Marshall  GPA 
september 2011 by jerryking
Understanding China Through the Ancient Game of Wei Qi, or Go - WSJ.com
JUNE 11, 2011 WSJ By KEITH JOHNSON What Kind of Game Is
China Playing? Forget chess. To understand geopolitics in Taiwan or the
Indian Ocean, U.S. strategists are learning from Go.

The object of Go is to place stones on the open board, balancing the need to expand with the need to build protected clusters.

Go features multiple battles over a wide front, rather than a single decisive encounter. It emphasizes long-term planning over quick tactical advantage, and games can take hours. In Chinese, its name, wei qi (roughly pronounced "way-chee"), means the "encirclement game."
China  strategy  games  Go  chess  geopolitics  U.S._military  leadership_development  USAF  multiple_targets 
june 2011 by jerryking
Jack Welch Blasts H-P’s Board - WSJ @ World Business Forum - WSJ
October 5, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By Paul Glader. “The
Hewlett-Packard board has committed sins over the last 10 years,” said
Mr. Welch. “They have not done one of the primary jobs of a board, which
is to prepare the next generation of leadership.” Leadership
development, Mr. Welch contended, “was very low on the priority of
leadership at that company.” Mr. Welch said a board’s job is to pick
CEOs, help them shape strategy, make them feel good about themselves,
and, if the CEO isn’t doing a good job, to “get them the hell out of
there.”
Jack_Welch  HP  boards_&_directors_&_governance  leadership_development 
october 2010 by jerryking
Educating Professionals
Jan-Feb 2009| Harvard Magazine | focus on training leaders:
through their development of judgment in establishing priorities; their
entrepreneurial vision in finding opportunities to solve problems; their
skill in communicating; their values and integrity; and their
commitment to action. .... Leaders are accountable for more than
themselves; they must be both willing and able to accept that
responsibility.”

In the end, Faust said, education throughout the University must be
informed by the recognition that “[L]eadership is a means; it is not an
end in itself.…Leaders exist to serve followers, and leaders’ successes
must be measured not simply by their power to move others, but by the
directions in which they take those who follow them.”
education  MBAs  HBS  Drew_Gilpin_Faust  leaders  leadership  leadership_development  Peter_Drucker  professional_education  deanships  serving_others 
july 2010 by jerryking
How to Translate Training into Results
June 15, 2010 | Harvard Business Review | by Ron Ashkenas.
"Many companies create leadership programs that are filled with good
content and delivered with great skill, but without any kind of
measurable business impact, they eventually die on the vine. Luckily the
"fix" for these kinds of programs is really quite simple: Require that
participants come to the program with a specific business challenge
(either individually or as a team); build time into the program to
create a plan for addressing that challenge based on the content that is
presented; and then insist that managers execute against these plans
after the program. Firms such as GE, Honeywell, Siemens, and many others
have used this approach for years with great success — and have
documented many millions of dollars of benefits. In essence they have
transformed their leadership development activities from a "cost center"
to a "profit center" — which makes them much more difficult to dismiss
when budgets get tight. "
leadership_development  training  HBR  leadership  GE  Freshbooks  cost_centers  profit_centers 
june 2010 by jerryking
Changing Mind-Sets About School, and Hygiene
January 11, 2010 | New York Times | By JENNIFER 8. LEE.
"Decoding the job title: It means that I do a lot of content and design
of school leadership stuff to develop the principals, the assistant
principals and the aspiring principals across the city. The office is
relatively new, in general. It was only created in 2007.

Before that? Achievement First Bushwick Middle School — I was the dean
of the students. I was basically the person in charge of culture,
discipline, student investment, student incentives, parent groups. The
whole theme of the school, as at all Achievement First schools, is to
strive to go to college. The fifth grade wasn’t known as the fifth
grade, it was known as the class of 2019, because that would be the year
that they would go to college."
leadership_development  teaching  education  role_models  schools  charter_schools  mindsets  policymaking 
january 2010 by jerryking
Developing Leaders: How Winning Companies Keep On Winning
Fall 2000| MIT Sloan Review | by Robert M. Fulmer, Philip A.
Gibbs, Marshall Goldsmith. Increasing the budget for education or
changing the name of a training department to “corporate university”
doesn't guarantee improved performance. Our study shows that, despite
the diversity of approaches to leadership...
GE  Freshbooks  Johnson_&_Johnson  leadership_development  corporate_universities  filetype:pdf  media:document 
november 2009 by jerryking
Commentary: How Leadership Programs Can Lead the Way
OCTOBER 15, 2001 | BW Online | By Deepak Sethi. "One of my
dreams is that companies would be widely considered training grounds for
future leaders. And I have seen some changes that keep that hope alive.
More and more companies encourage that thinking as they design their
own leadership-development programs."
executive_education  leadership_development  Thomson_Corp.  9/11  corporate_universities  Freshbooks 
november 2009 by jerryking
GENERAL ELECTRIC: AN OUTLIER IN CEO TALENT DEVELOPMENT
January/February 2009 | Ivey Business Journal | by Glenn Rowe and Roderick E. White and Derek Lehmberg and John R. Phillips
GE  corporate_universities  CEOs  leadership_development  talent_management  Freshbooks  Crotonville 
october 2009 by jerryking
Executive schooling demands real results
May 23, 2001 | The Globe & Mail pg. B.12 | by Harvey
Schachter. The best practice organizations in the book take pride that
their top leadership comes from within, preferring internal leaders
schooled in the powerful corporate cultures that allow their
organizations to thrive. Such companies also evaluate programs
carefully. Arthur Andersen, for example, not only asks participants to
fill out evaluation forms immediately after courses and then again a few
months later, but also carries out research to compare the performance
of partners who attended specific courses and those who didn't. In one
case, where participant satisfaction fell below the norm and the feeling
was that the program was unsatisfactory, the research determined that
course attendance had a positive effect on the participants' job
performance.
Harvey_Schachter  corporate_universities  Freshbooks  leadership_development  book_reviews  assessments_&_evaluations 
october 2009 by jerryking
Leadership development for small organizations
Mar 2002 | T + D | by Marshall Tarley. A discussion of how
small and medium-sized organizations can create an effective leadership
development program is presented. How GE creates talent is discussed. If
you want to be a leader at GE or in any business, you had better be a
top-notch manager. Management should be injected into people's DNA by
the way they are managed. Everyone at GE is imbued with the firm's
famous values, honed through years of input from GE managers. Everything
that is done at GE is measured against those values, including
performance appraisals, feedback, and goals. GE supports its managers
with leadership and management training. If the managers are successful,
they are given increasingly larger businesses to run and rotated into
different businesses.
corporate_universities  Crotonville  Freshbooks  GE  leadership_development  size  small_business  SMEs 
october 2009 by jerryking
How leaders develop leaders
May 1997 | Training & Development. Vol. 51, Iss. 5; pg. 58, 13 pgs | by Eli Cohen, Noel Tichy.
leadership_development  leadership  Freshbooks  organizational_culture  executive_management 
september 2009 by jerryking
Whirlpool Corp. Named One of the 'Best Places to Launch a Career' by BusinessWeek; Company Ranks Among Top 50 Employers for New College Grads
Sept. 5, 2008 | PR Newswire | by Anonymous. BusinessWeek's
"Best Places to Launch a Career" ranking is based on extensive surveys
of career services directors at U.S. colleges, the employers they
identify as the best for new graduates, and college students themselves.
onboarding  Freshbooks  boot_camps  leadership_development  Whirlpool  Employer_of_Choice 
september 2009 by jerryking
Leader Machines
Oct 1, 2007 | Fortune | Geoff Colvin. The best young employees
are hungry for leadership development. Companies are finding that the
advantages of building a reputation for developing talent are greater
than they may have thought. A close look at the companies on our list
reveals a set of best practices that seem to work in any environment: 1.
Invest time and money. 2. identify promising leaders early. 3. Choose
assignments strategically. 4. Develop leaders within their current jobs.
5. Be passionate about feedback and support. 6. Develop teams, not just
individuals. 7. Exert leadership through inspiration. 8. Encourage
leaders to be active in their communities. 9. Make leadership
development part of the culture.
Geoff_Colvin  Employer_of_Choice  leadership  organizational_culture  Freshbooks  onboarding  talent_management  reputation  leadership_development  Crotonville  CEOs 
september 2009 by jerryking
Despite Cutbacks, Firms Invest in Developing Leaders - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 9, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | By DANA MATTIOLI.
Despite layoffs and recession-starved budgets, many employers are
investing in leadership-development programs, hoping not to be caught
short of strong managers when the economy recovers.
human_capital  Canon  corporate_universities  leadership_development  Freshbooks  cost-cutting  Dana_Mattioli 
february 2009 by jerryking

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