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jerryking : life_skills   61

‘I Wish You Bad Luck,’ He Said With Good Intentions
Dec. 28, 2017 | WSJ | By Bob Greene.

In Spring 2017, Chief Justice John Roberts delivered a commencement address to his son's grade 9 graduation ceremony that offered a universal lesson about the value to be found in generosity of spirit. Roberts prepared the advice offered in his speech specifically for the commencement address, as he set out to reflect upon “some of the harsh realities that everyone will face in the course of a full life,” and how to anticipate them and learn from them....His speech was structured in pairs.....He told his audience that commencement speakers will typically “wish you good luck and extend good wishes to you. I will not do that, and I’ll tell you why.

“From time to time in the years to come, I hope you will be treated unfairly, so that you will come to know the value of justice.

“I hope that you will suffer betrayal, because that will teach you the importance of loyalty.

“Sorry to say, but I hope you will be lonely from time to time so that you don’t take friends for granted.

“I wish you bad luck, again, from time to time so that you will be conscious of the role of chance in life, and understand that your success is not completely deserved and that the failure of others is not completely deserved either.

“And when you lose, as you will from time to time, I hope every now and then your opponent will gloat over your failure. It is a way for you to understand the importance of sportsmanship.

“I hope you’ll be ignored so that you know the importance of listening to others, and I hope you will have just enough pain to learn compassion.

“Whether I wish these things or not, they’re going to happen. And whether you benefit from them or not will depend upon your ability to see the message in your misfortunes.”

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Also,......“Once a week, you should write a note to someone. Not an email. A note on a piece of paper. It will take you exactly 10 minutes.” Then, Roberts urged, put the note in an envelope and send it off the old way: via the mail.

The handwritten note, he said, might express appreciation for someone who has helped you out or treated you with kindness, and who may not know how grateful you are.........here’s a toast to bad luck, and to its hidden gifts. First, though, the corner mailbox awaits. Gratitude is priceless, but conveying it costs no more than a postage stamp.
advice  betrayals  chance  commencement  failure  friendships  gratitude  handwritten  John_Roberts  judges  justice  life_skills  loyalty  luck  pairs  speeches  sportsmanship  U.S._Supreme_Court  values  compassion  listening  inspiration  teachable_moments  counterintuitive  tough_love  good_intentions 
may 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | The Two Codes Your Kids Need to Know
Feb. 12, 2019 | The New York Times | By Thomas L. Friedman, Opinion Columnist.

A few years ago, the leaders of the College Board, the folks who administer the SAT college entrance exam, asked themselves a radical question: Of all the skills and knowledge that we test young people for that we know are correlated with success in college and in life, which is the most important? Their answer: the ability to master “two codes” — computer science and the U.S. Constitution......please show their work: “Why these two codes?”

Answer: if you want to be an empowered citizen in our democracy — able to not only navigate society and its institutions but also to improve and shape them, and not just be shaped by them — you need to know how the code of the U.S. Constitution works. And if you want to be an empowered and adaptive worker or artist or writer or scientist or teacher — and be able to shape the world around you, and not just be shaped by it — you need to know how computers work and how to shape them.....the internet, big data and artificial intelligence now the essential building blocks of almost every industry....mastering the principles and basic coding techniques that drive computers and other devices “will be more prepared for nearly every job,”....“At the same time, the Constitution forms the foundational code that gives shape to America and defines our essential liberties — it is the indispensable guide to our lives as productive citizens.”......“Understanding how government works is the essence of power. To be a strong citizen, you need to know how the structures of our government work and how to operate within them.”
African-Americans  civics  coding  constitutions  education  engaged_citizenry  foundational  high_schools  indispensable  individual_agency  life_skills  op-ed  public_education  questions  SAT  show_your_work  students  Tom_Friedman  women 
february 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | Robert E. Rubin: Philosophy Prepared Me for a Career in Finance and Government - The New York Times
By Robert E. Rubin

Mr. Rubin was secretary of the Treasury from 1995 to 1999.

April 30, 2018

Raphael Demos. Professor Demos, an authority on Greek philosophy, was Harvard’s Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy and Civil Policy. But to me, when I took a class with him my sophomore year, he was a genial little man with white hair and an exceptional talent for engaging students from the lecture hall stage, using an overturned wastebasket as his lectern. Professor Demos would use Plato and other great philosophers to demonstrate that proving any proposition to be true in the final and ultimate sense was impossible. His approach to critical thinking planted a seed in me that grew during my years at Harvard and throughout my life. The approach appealed to what was probably my natural but latent tendency toward questioning and skepticism.

I concluded that you can’t prove anything in absolute terms, from which I extrapolated that all significant decisions are about probabilities. Internalizing the core tenet of Professor Demos’s teaching — weighing risk and analyzing odds and trade-offs — was central to everything I did professionally in the decades ahead in finance and government.......Demos crystallized for me the power of critical thinking: asking questions, recognizing that there are no provable certainties and analyzing the probabilities. And that, coupled with my coffeehouse lessons, was the best preparation one could have — not just for a career but also for life.
Robert_Rubin  Colleges_&_Universities  Harvard  philosophers  philosophy  Plato  Wall_Street  Goldman_Sachs  career_paths  advice  life_skills  probabilities  decision_making  critical_thinking  U.S.Treasury_Department  Greek  tradeoffs 
may 2018 by jerryking
The young person's guide to extreme success: What I wish I had known when I was 20 - YouTube
Your life is nothing more than a series of choices....you are the compilation of your choices!!
Rule #1: Think carefully about relationships and children.
Rule #2: Learn how to start a business, just in case.
Rule #3: Always think like an investor in every part of your life (investing--Sun Tzu "The battle is won before it begins"; invest your time like its money, learn how to ignore the world when necessary, 1, 3, 5, 10 yr. goals--figure out what you need to do that day, schedule how you will use your time each day)
Rule #4: Educated geeks are now running the world (educational mediocrity is unacceptable); (listen to everybody, stop talking so damn much).
Ruel #5: Protect your mental and physical health [(exercise, keep losers away from the things you value (i.e. mind, body, spirit, family, time, business)] Be miserly with my time.
Rule #6: Stop being normal!!
advice  preparation  life_skills  relationships  parenting  conflict_resolution  Sun_Tzu  owners  self-education  exercise  positive_thinking  affirmations  time-management  Pablo_Picasso  geeks  delayed_gratification  Boyce_Watkins  choices 
september 2017 by jerryking
Life lessons from original thinkers
Jan. 9, 2016 | The Financial Times. (): Business News: p5. |
Simon Kuper

'Our era undervalues original thinkers, because we tend to rank people by their fame and money'

One nice thing about m...
Simon_Kuper  life_skills  lessons_learned  iconoclasts  originality  life_lessons 
february 2016 by jerryking
Courses in Manhood for African-American Boys - The New York Times
FEB. 4, 2016 | NYT | By PATRICIA LEIGH BROWN.

While lower grades focus on the stories, legacies and images of black people, high school students take a deep dive into African-American history and culture, from ancient civilizations to the civil rights movement to contemporary media. All classes are taught by black male instructors whose own experiences and perspectives provide a multidimensional understanding of the students they mentor (in Oakland, as elsewhere, more than half the teachers are white and most are women).
African-Americans  coming-of-age  cultural_identity  high_schools  history  life_skills  male  masculinity  mentoring  Oakland  rituals  students  values 
february 2016 by jerryking
Mark Toole's answer to What can you teach me that can be useful in my life? - Quora
Initiative:
If there is something that you want, something that would improve your life, find a way to take positive action towards it. Maybe it isn’t your job. Maybe you can get away with not doing it. Take action anyways. Turn on the light.

Ask forgiveness, not permission:
If the likelihood of harming yourself or someone else is low, do what needs to be done and deal with any problems if they come up. So many people are paralyzed by this, so developing this habit alone will change your life.

Help people, expect nothing:
Be the person who makes things better for other people. Leave things better than you found them. Wipe off the counter when someone else leaves a mess.... Most people will never notice or appreciate it. Some people will. These are the only people who matter.

Keep learning, keep asking questions:
If you want to know something, try to find out the answer. Ask people. When you think you know something, answer other people’s questions about it. Teaching or explaining something expands your own knowledge on the subject. Read a lot on a variety of subjects, fiction and nonfiction. Take online courses.... Ask thought provoking questions. Constantly improve. Maintain your curiosity.
life-changing  life_skills  Quora  curiosity  questions  serving_others  life_long_learning  individual_initiative  foregiveness  permissions 
september 2015 by jerryking
The Most Important Question You Can Ask
APRIL 25, 2014 | NYT | By TONY SCHWARTZ.

The answer to “In the service of what?” is to add more value to the commons than we take out, and not to discount any good that we can do.

“We must not, in trying to think about how we can make a big difference,” said the children’s rights advocate Marian Wright Edelman, “ignore the small daily differences we can make, which, over time, add up to big differences that we cannot foresee.”

Personal accomplishments make us feel good. Adding value to other people’s lives makes us feel good about ourselves. But there is a difference. The good feelings we get from serving others are deeper and last longer. Think for a moment about what you want your children to remember about you after you’re gone. Do more of that.
work_life_balance  Tony_Schwartz  serving_others  hedge_funds  questions  slight_edge  legacies  values  life_skills  compounded  personal_accomplishments  foundational  cumulative 
april 2014 by jerryking
Life Coaches for the Entrepreneurial Set - NYTimes.com
By PAUL SULLIVANFEB. 10, 2014

In order to work with me meant works,” Clients need to carve time out out of their schedules to work with me. Such coaches, after all, represent a somewhat amorphous profession. They are not psychotherapists who will mine the past for solutions to the present, nor are they strictly business consultants tasked with, say, fixing part of a company. Rather, they are people without prescribed credentials, though often with experience in the client’s field, who have won trust through experience or reputation to guide a client to an agreed-upon life, career or business goal.....many successful entrepreneurs who turn to coaches, wanted to do better. To some this means having more money; to others it means more family time. To still others, it could mean going to the next level in a career, starting a company or simply finding a way to be more present at work and at home.
entrepreneur  life_skills  coaching  financial_advisors 
february 2014 by jerryking
Why you need to build your legacy now
Dec. 24 2013 | The Globe and Mail | JESSICA LEIGH JOHNSTON

“Are you on this planet to do something, or are you here for something to do?" --after some thinking, they understand that the answer is to do something. Then we say, “If you’re here to do something, what is it?”
the legacy you leave is the life you lead: it’s what you are doing right now that determines how you will be remembered. Thinking of ‘life’ as an acronym is a helpful guideline for thinking about legacy:

· What are the Lessons that you want people to say you taught them?

· What are the Ideals you hope people will say that you stood for?

· What are the Feelings you hope people will say they had when you were around them?

· What are the tangible Expressions of your leadership? Not just your accomplishments, but the things you might have contributed. Maybe you worked every Saturday for 25 years for Habitat for Humanity, or you were active in the community as a volunteer for sports. What are some of those tangible achievements?

We find this framework useful for people to reflect on legacy, and to come back to it periodically and ask themselves, “Is there anything more I want to add, and am I living my life in harmony with these guidelines?”

"What is the best way to learn something?” And I thought I had the learned the answer to that question, and said confidently: “The best way to learn something is to experience it yourself.” Fred turned to me and he said, “No, Jim, the best way to learn something is to teach it to someone else.”
legacies  leadership  JCK  life_skills  teaching  serving_others  values  affirmations  mybestlife 
december 2013 by jerryking
Need a Job? Invent It
March 30, 2013 | NYTimes.com | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN.

Tony Wagner, the Harvard education specialist, describes his job today, he says he’s “a translator between two hostile tribes” — the education world and the business world, the people who teach our kids and the people who give them jobs. Wagner’s argument in his book “Creating Innovators: The Making of Young People Who Will Change the World” is that our K-12 and college tracks are not consistently “adding the value and teaching the skills that matter most in the marketplace.” ... I asked Wagner, what do young people need to know today?

“Every young person will continue to need basic knowledge, of course,” he said. “But they will need [transferable, hard & soft] skills and motivation even more. Of these three education goals, motivation is the most critical. Young people who are intrinsically motivated — curious, persistent, and willing to take risks — will learn new knowledge and skills continuously. They will be able to find new opportunities or create their own — a disposition that will be increasingly important as many traditional careers disappear.”...Reimagining schools for the 21st-century must be our highest priority. We need to focus more on teaching the skill and will to learn and to make a difference and bring the three most powerful ingredients of intrinsic motivation into the classroom: play, passion and purpose.” ...We need to focus more on teaching the skill and will to learn and to make a difference and bring the three most powerful ingredients of intrinsic motivation into the classroom: play, passion and purpose.”

What does that mean for teachers and principals?

“Teachers,” he said, “need to coach students to performance excellence, and principals must be instructional leaders who create the culture of collaboration required to innovate. But what gets tested is what gets taught, and so we need ‘Accountability 2.0.’ All students should have digital portfolios to show evidence of mastery of skills like critical thinking and communication, which they build up right through K-12 and postsecondary. Selective use of high-quality tests, like the College and Work Readiness Assessment, is important.
Tom_Friedman  books  students  education  life_skills  innovation  teaching  teachers  high_schools  K-12  motivations  play  purpose  transferable_skills  mindsets  intrinsically_motivated  passions  high-quality  tribes  young_people 
march 2013 by jerryking
Feminists need to challenge themselves, too
Mar. 04 2013 |The Globe and Mail | by NAOMI WOLF.
[dissatisfaction = challenging oneself = self-challenge]
Ms. Sandberg is seeking not just to raise consciousness, but to forge a social movement. She wants her “Lean In” circles – all-women spaces to be supported by corporate workplaces – to teach women negotiation, public speaking and other skills, all merged with upbeat collective support....the opportunity to learn and practise speaking and negotiating skills is hardly inconsequential for women’s advancement... Institutional battles to redress women’s underrepresentation in land ownership, politics, and so on must be coupled with individualized leadership and skills training for women, ideally in an atmosphere of mutual support in which women learn from peers how to achieve and enlarge their own goals.
Sheryl_Sandberg  glass_ceilings  Facebook  social_movements  women  self-scrutiny  mentoring  movingonup  life_skills  workplaces  self-promotion  land_ownership  leadership_development  consciousness-raising  feminism  dissatisfaction  under-representation 
march 2013 by jerryking
Teaching High School Students Applied Logical Reasoning
2009 | Journal of Information Technology Education Volume 8,
Innovations in Practice | Dan Bouhnik and Yahel Giat

The rapid changes in information technology in recent years have rendered current high school
curricula unable to cope with student needs. In consequence, students do not possess the proper
skills required in today’s information era. Specifically, many students lack the skills to search
efficiently for information. Moreover, even when abundant information is available to them, students
are unable to critically read, analyze, and evaluate it.
To address these problems we developed a high school course designed to provide students with
applied logical tools. The course was developed for two different student groups: social sciencesoriented
students and exact sciences-oriented students. It is composed of several parts whose contents
depend on the students’ orientation. This course is part of a broader program whose purpose
is a comprehensive study and understanding of logical and concept-based systems....Thus, instead of utilizing this abundant information to produce better informed students, we often find that students are unable to distinguish true from false, separate fact from fiction, identify the underlying motives, and reach sound and reasoned opinions
agreeably_disagree  argumentation  commoditization_of_information  critical_thinking  decision_making  disagreements  education  high_schools  information_overload  Junior_Achievement  life_skills  logic_&_reasoning  rapid_change  rhetoric  students 
november 2011 by jerryking
New urban design plays a heady game of risk
Mar 12, 2005 | The Globe and Mail pg. F.3|
Doug Saunders.

The slogan of the new movement that is overtaking Europe's cities: "To make it safe, you need to make it dangerous." Iain Borden, director of the Bartlett School of Architecture in London and a leader of this new movement. Its members recently published an intriguing report titled "What Are We Scared of: The Value of Risk in Designing Public Space."

In recent months, a school of architects and urban planners has picked up disparate cues from the urban experiments taking place in northern Europe and given them a name -- risk. Our cities, they believe, are now designed predominantly to minimize risk, and this has made them dull, homogeneous, repetitious and, paradoxically, often quite dangerous.

(Risk is more than an intellectual puzzle — it invokes a profoundly physical experience. A small amount of danger surrounding the use of public spaces might act much like a vaccine immunizing the population against complacency).
Doug_Saunders  urban  design  risks  safety  public_spaces  counterintuitive  urban_planning  uncertainty  complacency  biology  psychology  dangers  life_skills  coming-of-age  risk-assessment  high-risk  low-risk  soul-enriching  physical_experiences 
october 2011 by jerryking
Business Advice: 14 Things I Wish I Could Have Told Myself at 25
August 24, 2011 | BNET | By Jeff Haden
1. Everybody wants something.
2. What a few people want is just to feel good about helping others.
3. Everything before “but” is bull.
4. Boring people win.
5. Stop brainstorming and start borrowing.
6. The women you really want to meet don’t care about the kind of car you drive. Darn it.
7. Training is great; advice is not.
8. Visibility is everything.
9. Always take out something.
10. The people who say the least have the most to say.
11. Your parents are a lot smarter than you think.
12. Always learn on the fly.
13. Don’t expect to get back what you give.
14. You will only regret what you decide not do.
advice  brainstorming  jck  Jeff_Haden  indispensable  lessons_learned  life_skills  regrets  unglamorous  visibility 
august 2011 by jerryking
The noble wishes of an unsung heroine - The Globe and Mail
April 13, 2011 Nigel Tufnel1
This is a change from the previous column...I applaud Ms. Blatchford for
it.I wonder how many of the people playing one-upmanship in the
comments would have run into that burning bldg.. I have a simple
proposition for everyone. Do what you think should be done, & accept
the consequences & your role in them. If that means doing nothing
except chiding this young girl for getting pregnant and not having as
clear a direction to success as you wish she had, so be it, it's your
call. But here's a thought - she's a human being with an address &
likely a telephone #, not simply an artifact for your disdain and moral
one-upmanship. Step up to the plate and become the mentor she needs,
rather than the pit of negativity & judgment that will accomplish
nothing. Give her a hand up with your sage wisdom & guidance if you
think she does not deserve a "handout". Email Ms. Blatchford with your
offer of assistance, I'm sure she could find the girl and get you in
touch.
letters_to_the_editor  Christie_Blatchford  heroines  volunteering  values  life_skills  mentoring  movingonup 
april 2011 by jerryking
Excerpt: Buy-In: Saving Your Good Idea from Getting Shot Down
October 8, 2010 | BusinessWeek | In an edited excerpt from
their new book, John Kotter and Lorne Whitehead introduce a
counterintuitive approach to turning skeptics into advocates for your
new idea, plan, or proposal....The true buying-in of a new idea is about
winning over hearts and minds--it is an emotional commitment. The
single biggest challenge faced when obtaining buy-in for a good idea is
getting people's attention. Don't try to overcome attacks with tons of
data or logic. Instead, do what might seem to be the opposite. Keep
responses short and above all, RESPECTFUL. Goal is to "win" the thoughts
and feelings of the majority, not the 1 or 2 critics so watch the crowd
very carefully. Don't try to wing it, even if you know all the facts
thoroughly, even if the idea seems bulletproof, and even if you expect a
friendly audience. Preparation can significantly build confidence and
reduce anxiety.
resistance  obstacles  excerpts  HBS  persuasion  John_Kotter  howto  ideas  books  Communicating_&_Connecting  pitches  life_skills  Managing_Your_Career  attention  attention_spans  preparation  emotional_commitment  self-confidence  buy-in  counterintuitive  skeptics  the_single_most_important 
march 2011 by jerryking
Wealth and Fitness Secret – Ratios - Rich Karlgaard - Innovation Rules -
Dec. 21 2010 | Forbes | Rich Karlgaard. Success is often a
matter of getting the ratios right. Business and investing success is
hardly possible without understanding ratios. Knowing the numbers is
important. But knowing the numbers in relation to other numbers will
make you a millionaire. You will see anomalies that others miss. I’ll
never forget a comment made by George Soros in July 2008, when oil was
$147.50 a barrel. A Goldman Sachs analyst had predicted oil was headed
to $200, but Soros knew better. Why? Because oil was already too
expensive compared to gold. At $147.50, oil was 1:6 the price of gold.
The normal ratio band is 1:10 to 1:15, said Soros. Either gold had to
rise, or oil had to fall. Because Soros could not see any inflation that
might drive gold higher, oil had to fall.
anomalies  base_rates  contextual_intelligence  fingerspitzengefühl  George_Soros  insights  jck  ksfs  lessons_learned  life_skills  metrics  moguls  pattern_recognition  proportionality  ratios  Rich_Karlgaard 
december 2010 by jerryking
Managing Yourself: How to Save Good Ideas
September 2010 | - Harvard Business Review | An Interview with
John P. Kotter by Jeff Kehoe. Why do so many good ideas generated by
well-intentioned, talented people fail? Because the audience is
comprised of human beings with anxieties, contrary opinions, and a
constant fear of losing face....large-scale organizational change
requires helping people to communicate, bringing them around to support
your vision, your strategy, your plan—and, in a smaller sense, just your
idea. It's an important element and we’re not very good at it. Getting
buy-in for good ideas is a basic human issue; it’s a life
skill....Kotter & Whitehead, suggest in their new book, Buy-In:
Saving Your Good Idea from Getting Shot Down, a counterintuitive
approach to gaining support: “inviting in the lions” to critique the
idea....anticipate being attacked when presenting a new idea, respond
with respectful using very short, simple, clear, communications filled
with common sense.
backlash  buy-in  Communicating_&_Connecting  failure  HBR  howto  human_factor  human_frailties  ideas  implementation  John_Kotter  large-scale  life_skills  Managing_Your_Career  obstacles  organizational_change  persuasion  pitches  resistance 
september 2010 by jerryking
Knowledge of math = personal success + better citizenship - The Globe and Mail
September 2, 2010 | Globe & Mail editorial.

Modern citizens should be able to approach quantitative studies and claims both critically and respectfully. Indeed, non-scientific lay people may be better able to evaluate them than they expect, because statistical studies often depend upon some quite loose, non-mathematical concepts, and common sense may detect imprecision and even fallacies in the very premises of the research in question.

Democracy and the market economy, in this age of mathematical science, require a public that is numerate enough to have some sense of what is valid - and won't just acquiesce or shrug their shoulders.
citizenship  civics  democracy  engaged_citizenry  fallacies_follies  imprecision  infoliteracy  life_skills  mathematics  numeracy 
september 2010 by jerryking
Op-Ed Columnist - The Summoned Self - NYTimes.com
August 2, 2010 | New York Times | By DAVID BROOKS. the
Well-Planned Life: Find a clear purpose for your life. Once you have an
overall purpose, make decisions about allocating your time, energy and
talent. Qualifier: People with a high need for achievement commonly
misallocate their resources, favouring things that will yield tangible
and near-term accomplishments (often work-related) at the expense of
other things (e.g. the long term work of a parent raising a child) that
may be more important. Life appears as a well-designed project,
carefully conceived in the beginning, reviewed and adjusted along the
way and brought toward a well-rounded fruition. vs. the Summoned Life:
Life as an unknowable landscape to be explored. the most important
features of the human landscape are commitments that precede choice —
commitments to family, nation, faith or some cause. These commitments
defy the logic of cost and benefit, investment and return.
achievement-oriented  Clayton_Christensen  commitments  David_Brooks  life_skills  misallocations  purpose  resource_allocation  talent_allocation  time-management  unknowables  well-rounded 
august 2010 by jerryking
"We are What We Choose"
May 30, 2010 | Princeton University - 2010 Baccalaureate
remarks | Remarks by Jeff Bezos, as delivered to the Class of 2010.
"My grandfather looked at me, and after a bit of silence, he gently and
calmly said, "Jeff, one day you'll understand that it's harder to be
kind than clever." What I want to talk to you about today is the
difference between gifts and choices. Cleverness is a gift, kindness is a
choice. Gifts are easy -- they're given after all. Choices can be hard.
You can seduce yourself with your gifts if you're not careful, and if
you do, it'll probably be to the detriment of your choices."
===============================
Boyce Watkins: Your life is nothing more than a series of choices....you are the compilation of your choices!!
inspiration  commencement  Jeff_Bezos  life_skills  advice  cleverness  kindness  Princeton  choices  speeches  self-delusions  Boyce_Watkins 
july 2010 by jerryking
Patrick Lencioni: The Most Important Leadership Trait You Shun - WSJ.com
JUNE 22, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By PATRICK LENCIONI.
Writes about vulnerability, the ability to be genuinely honest about
one's weaknesses, mistakes and needs for help. Whether we're talking
about leadership, teamwork or client service, nothing inspires trust in
another human being as much as vulnerability . There is just something
immensely attractive and inspiring about humility and graciousness.
leadership  Patrick_Lencioni  personal_growth  life_skills  humility  weaknesses  authenticity  trustworthiness  grace  vulnerabilities 
june 2010 by jerryking
The new heavyweight champions
June 12, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Margaret Wente. 30 yrs.
ago, most of these men handily out-earned their wives. But the situation
has reversed. Could this be the future? Very likely. At every age and
income level, women are more likely than ever before to be the major or
sole breadwinner in the family...The modern, postindustrial economy
rewards people with a high degree of emotional intelligence who can
navigate complex social networks. It rewards people who are flexible,
adaptable and co-operative, who have good verbal skills, and who can
work diligently, sit still and focus long enough to get the credentials
they need to land a job. Women tend to be better at these things than
men. They’re also good at all the gender-neutral stuff, such as sales
and analytical skills. Meantime, as muscle jobs vanish, men are showing
little or no interest in becoming dental hygienists, kindergarten
teachers or anything else that requires a high degree of people skills
and nurturing.
women  workplaces  gender_gap  Margaret_Wente  life_skills  people_skills  EQ  emotional_intelligence 
june 2010 by jerryking
Op-Ed Columnist - The Sandra Bullock Trade - NYTimes.com
March 29, 2010 | NYT | By DAVID BROOKS. Marital happiness is
far more important than anything else in determining personal
well-being. If you have a successful marriage, it doesn’t matter how
many professional setbacks you endure, you will be reasonably happy. If
you have an unsuccessful marriage, it doesn’t matter how many career
triumphs you record, you will remain significantly unfulfilled...the
correspondence between personal relationships and happiness is not
complicated. The daily activities most: associated with happiness are
sex, socializing after work and having dinner with others...injurious to
happiness is commuting...to find a good place to live, ask people if
they trust their neighbors...interpersonal relationships [are]
important...We need better preparation at making social decisions. “The
Hidden Wealth of Nations” by David Halpern & “The Politics of
Happiness” by Derek Bok — argue that public institutions should pay
attention to well-being and not just material growth.
books  happiness  relationships  marriage  David_Brooks  trustworthiness  life_skills  personal_relationships  pay_attention 
march 2010 by jerryking
Corner Office - Guy Kawasaki - I Want 5 Sentences, Not ‘War and Peace’ - Question - NYTimes.com
March 19, 2010 | New York Times | This interview of Guy
Kawasaki, a co-founder of Alltop, a news aggregation site, and managing
director of Garage Technology Ventures, was conducted, edited and
condensed by Adam Bryant.

Jobs for college graduates should make them gain knowledge in at least
one of these three areas: how to make something, how to sell something
or how to support something.
Guy_Kawasaki  Peter_Drucker  advice  howto  life_skills  education  new_graduates  college-educated 
march 2010 by jerryking
Judging the risks in the backcountry
Feb 4, 2003 | The Globe & Mail pg. A.18 | editorial.
Becoming independent requires some assumption of risk. That is the
process of growing up. Toronto's school board, failing to understand
this, demolished its playground equipment in 170 schoolyards three years
ago without any statistical evidence of dangerousness. Hockey, Canada's
game, exposes boys and girls to the risk of serious spinal-cord
injuries, yet the game goes on.
backcountry  risks  life_and_death  life_skills  TDSB  editorials  coming-of-age  risk-assessment  playgrounds  dangers  soul-enriching  children 
december 2009 by jerryking
To Work Better, Try Working Less - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by SUE
SHELLENBARGER. # Identify future goals; # Plan for deadlines far in
advance. # Set, and focus on, top hourly, daily or weekly priorities.
Sue_Shellenbarger  time-management  productivity  Managing_Your_Career  life_skills 
september 2009 by jerryking
Creating a Life Plan - Michael Hyatt
In this post, I want to share with you how to create such a
plan for your life. My comments will get you started, but I would also
suggest that you read Chapter 5, “Your Life Plan,” in Becoming a
Coaching Leader by Daniel Harkavy. The whole book is excellent, but this
chapter in particular will describe the process in more detail. You
should also note that my Life Plan outline is slightly different than
Daniel’s. I have modified it through the years, but the essence remains
the same.

My Life Plan is surprisingly short; it is only five pages long. It
consists of three sections:

* Outcomes
* Priorities
* Action Plans
lifehacks  howto  productivity  life_skills  Michael_Hyatt  action_plans  priorities  outcomes 
september 2009 by jerryking
You're a Success, Now Get Down to Work - WSJ.com
AUGUST 20, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by ALEXANDRA LEVIT.
Examining where you might have shortcomings can make or break a career.
Becoming as successful as you can be -- after you've already climbed
part of the ladder -- means you need two things. For starters, you need
outstanding people skills: Listen carefully, think before you speak,
reciprocate favors and manage conflicts diplomatically. Second, you
must regularly take a hard look at yourself and address your weak
points. For example, if you have a communication issue with one person
or a group of people, step away from the blame game and ask yourself,
"How can I be better?" Make sure people are honest with you by
requesting feedback anonymously and confidentially.

Remember: "Strong leaders don't coast."
Achilles’_heel  Alexandra_Levit  blaming_fingerpointing  emotional_intelligence  EQ  high-achieving  life_skills  Managing_Your_Career  movingonup  overachievers  people_skills  self-analysis  self-awareness  self-improvement  self-reflective  shortcomings  success  up-and-comers  weaknesses 
august 2009 by jerryking
How to Work the Room
Sunday, June 24, 2007 | GIGAOM - Found|Read | Larry Chiang
life_skills  tips  Communicating_&_Connecting  networking  social  howto 
april 2009 by jerryking
Pitching With Purpose
Published: April 1, 2008 |New York Times | By DAVID BROOKS

“Self-discipline is a form of freedom. Freedom from laziness and
lethargy, freedom from expectations and demands of others, freedom from
weakness and fear — and doubt.” You can’t simply urge someone to be
disciplined; you have to build a structure of behavior and attitude.
Behavior shapes thought. If a player disciplines his behavior, then he
will also discipline his mind. A pitcher’s mind is better balanced when
it is unceasingly aggressive.
habits  David_Brooks  book_reviews  baseball  self-discipline  mindsets  attitudes  life_skills  work_habits  routines 
april 2009 by jerryking
Five Things I've Learned From Andy Grove - America's Business (usnews.com)
November 06, 2006 01:00 PM ET | Rick Newman

(1) The most enduring power comes from knowledge, not from status.
(2) Knowledge helps you know when it's time to change.
(3) Certainty is deadly.
(4) Fear is highly motivating
(5) Even geniuses make mistakes.
profile  lessons_learned  Intel  Andy_Grove  overconfidence  life_skills  fear  mistakes  uncertainty  pretense_of_knowledge  certainty 
april 2009 by jerryking
The Art Of The Online Résumé
May 7, 2007 | Business Week | by Douglas MacMILLAN

How to assemble a résumé effectively for online consumption is a key
skill. include 25 keywords that are contextually relevant to your work
history, without sounding stilted or forced. Create a personal statement
posted to my own website which outlines broader career goals. Fill with
Google-optimized keywords.
howto  job_search  résumés  optimization  keywords  life_skills  personal_branding 
april 2009 by jerryking
How to Handle Rejection
Jul/Aug 2007 | Psychology Today| By Carlin Flora

How to find the positive in a pink slip or critical words. Rejection can help you reinvent yourself.
Fired Up: What Happens if You Get Canned by Woody Allen?
The Good Critique: It's an art form that everyone needs.
7 Reality Checks
rejections  howto  bouncing_back  psychology  reinvention  constructive_criticism  overthinking  life_skills 
april 2009 by jerryking
Big Middle-Class Sister
Autumn 2008 | City Journal | Naomi Schaefer Riley

We shouldn’t apologize for teaching poor kids how to move up in America.
values  mentoring  NaomiSchaeferRiley  disadvantages  disorganization  movingonup  nonjudgmentalism  life_skills  roadmaps 
march 2009 by jerryking
Hallmarks of an entrepreneur striving for gold
02-Aug-2005 | Financial Times pg. 8 | by John Mullins.

Entrepreneurs can succeed in difficult industries, but they must – among other things – be able to:

· Identify the critical success factors specific to their particular industry;

· Assemble a team that can deliver on these factors.

(1) Which decisions or activities are the ones that, if carried out wrong, will have crippling effects on company performance?
(2) Which decisions or activities, done right, will have a disproportionately positive effect on performance?
(3) In terms of skilful team-building, what skills do you have? Need?
disproportionality  entrepreneur  industry_expertise  ksfs  linchpins  jck  life_skills  online_travel  questions  rate-limiting_steps  site_selection  skills  skiing  Starbucks  start_ups  teams  think_threes  tourism 
march 2009 by jerryking
The Future of Reading: In Web Age, Library Job Gets Update
Published: February 15, 2009 NYT article By MOTOKO RICH.
Profiles Stephanie Rosalia, a librarian at Public School 225 in
Brooklyn, who teaches Internet, research and life skills (e.g. thinking
critically about information sources).
critical_thinking  rethinking  life_skills  libraries  books  reading  provenance  information_sources 
february 2009 by jerryking
Getting a Boost Up the Ladder of Success
July 15, 2007 NYT column by BEN STEIN. There is need for some
well-organized human being in the government or private sector to create
an organization that would go into schools on a continuing basis and
teach people how careers are made. I wonder whether there could be some
link with teachers in schools in nonrich neighborhoods who could tell
helpful men and women about boys and girls who need mentors to get them
going into higher education and entry-level jobs, and then to counsel
them about how to behave on the job and in school.
Ben_Stein  social_capital  values  life_skills  mentoring  movingonup 
january 2009 by jerryking
Can a Job Layoff Be a Good Thing?
MARCH 15, 2005 WSJ column by Erin White counseling introspection en route to career changes.
layoffs  career  life_skills  bouncing_back  resilience  Erin_White 
january 2009 by jerryking
I spent my twenties obsessing about what I should do.
April 25, 2008 G& M column by Barbara Moses aimed at 20-something new grads confused about career and life choices.
Managing_Your_Career  Barbara_Moses  life_skills  career  millennials 
january 2009 by jerryking
SELF-MANAGEMENT: Want a better life? Follow a flight plan
June 9, 2008 G&M column by Harvey Schachter on
SELF-MANAGEMENT; STRATEGY ANALYSIS? WHAT ANALYSIS? ; and SELF-
MANAGEMENT LEARN YOUR FUDGE RATIO.
Managing_Your_Career  career  strategy  Harvey_Schachter  life_skills  self-management 
january 2009 by jerryking
Parting Shot: What I Learned From Writing 1,008 Columns - WSJ.com
April 9, 2008 parting words from the WSJ's Jonathan Clements in
which he distills the lessons learned over the years since his "Getting
Going" column began in 1994.
tips  money  money_management  lessons_learned  life_skills  personal_finance  farewells  Jonathan_Clements 
january 2009 by jerryking
How to Fix Your Life in 2008 - WSJ.com
Dec. 27, 2007 | WSJ | article offering strategies for saving time and money.
lifehacks  life_skills  tips  howto 
january 2009 by jerryking

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