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jerryking : liquidity_events   11

What’s Left After a Family Business Is Sold?
Aug. 9, 2019 | The New York Times | By Paul Sullivan

Having a pile of money after a company is sold, in place of a company, with all of its stress and complications, would seem like a relief. But a company often holds families together by giving members a shared identity and conferring a status in the community established by previous generations.

Without the company, the family’s perception of itself and its purpose can change, and it is often something that members are not prepared for. Their focus was on running the business and then on the sale; little thought went into what comes next......“The key to doing it successfully is how you prepare yourself and how you prepare your family. It’s really a lifestyle choice.”

If families do not do it right, splitting apart is almost inevitable. “A shared business becomes very much a glue,” ....“When the business is sold, what we see in almost every situation is some family member splits away.” .....Most advisers say the sale of a family business should focus on the transition from operating a company to managing a portfolio of money, not on the money itself. Sometimes the magnitude of the sale becomes an issue for a family’s identity, particularly if the acquisition price becomes public......some families focus more on the money than the traits that made the business successful, and fail to grasp the difference between an operating business and financial capital. ....years before the sale, the family had been formulating a plan for its wealth that focused on family values but also held the members accountable. A family scorecard, for example, tracks their progress on 40 items that the family has deemed important, including working hard, investing wisely and the protecting its legacy.
Mr. Deary said the family used the scorecard to objectively answer the question: “Are we constantly trying to get a little bit better every day at what we do?”

As the wealth stretches out and families grow, those values can become a substitute for the company.
.....continuing education about a family’s values, particularly when the company was gone, allowed successive generations to understand where their wealth came from.

Those values often work best when they are broad — honesty, integrity, hard work — and not so specific that family members chafe. “The loose binds bind best,”

Family relationships can suffer when there are no shared values but strong financial connections, like a large trust or partnership that manages the wealth.
accountability  exits  family  family_business  family_office  family_scorecards  family_values  generations  generational_wealth  heirs  liquidity_events  money_management  purpose  relationships  Second_Acts  self-perception  unprepared  values  wealth_management 
august 2019 by jerryking
You must do these two difficult things to invest as patiently as the greats - The Globe and Mail
TOM BRADLEY
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jan. 15, 2017

Great investors have differences, but they share a number of key attributes.

They have an independent view. They feel no obligation to invest in something because others are doing it or because it’s a part of an index. Indeed, they prefer when a stock isn’t popular or heavily traded.

They buy when opportunities present themselves, not when the money is available. Cash doesn’t burn a hole in their pocket.

They buy assets that, in their reasoned opinion, will eventually be worth considerably more than they’re able to purchase them for. The key word being eventually. Their time frame is only slightly shorter than that.

They don’t get hung up on short-term events, although they do monitor them closely so they can take advantage of opportunities. Price movements and/or liquidity events may allow them to buy more or sell, and any new information can be used to update their valuation models.

You get the picture. Patient capital is focused on long-term value creation. It’s comfortable being out-of-sync with popular trends. And it doesn’t get distressed by market dislocations, it gets excited.

If working with a financial adviser, they have to understand and believe in the patient-capital approach. No prattling from them about quick stock or ETF flips. No recommendations of "hot" fund managers nor cold feet when short-term results are poor.

You want advisers and money managers who can live up to the traits listed above and, ideally, who are working in organizations that exemplify the same traits. You and your adviser have a better chance of being “patient capital” if the firm’s sales, marketing, product development and investment strategies are aligned.
Tom_Bradley  investors  long-term  strategic_patience  liquidity_events  personality_types/traits  dislocations  undervalued  opportunistic  unanimity  personal_finance  financial_advisors  contrarians  independent_viewpoints  financial_pornography  best_of 
january 2017 by jerryking
Auction houses embracing digital technology to sell to the new global rich
SEPTEMBER 18, 2014 by: John Dizard.

....The auction houses have been under pressure to adapt to this changing universe. While the most visible aspect of the houses’ digital revolution may be their online auctions, the most essential is in the systematising and networking of their customer, market and lot information. Without that, the auctioneers would lose control of their ability to charge gross margins in the mid-teens as intermediaries of the $30bn global art auction market....Within the quasi-duopoly of Christie’s and Sotheby’s at the top of the auction world, Christie’s has now moved to implement what it calls its “digital strategy”....Christie’s now has James Map (as in founder James Christie), a sort of private internal social network that allows specialists, client service staff, support staff and executives to see what is known about a client and his tastes. Past auction records, relatives’ purchases and sales, statistical inferences on how likely clients are to move from buying an expensive watch online to participating in a high-end evening sale – it all can be in the mix.

The idea, Murphy explains, was “to create an internal app that spiders into our database of information and brings up on our internal [screen] environment lots of connectivity. This is faster and better than the email chains [that it replaced].”....This summer, Sotheby’s announced a partnership with eBay, the online auction giant. While the details of the partnership are still being developed, it is understood eBay will distribute live Sotheby’s auctions to its global audience of 150m buyers.

Ken Citron, Christie’s head of IT

The digital strategy is also making it easier to take part in auctions. Even with all the unseen know-your-customer checks now required by financial supervisory agencies, it has become much faster and easier to register as an auction house client. About half now do so online.

But while the online revolution may have left some auction houses behind, for others it is generating new business. Auction houses used to regard the sale of smaller, cheaper objects from, for example, estate liquidations as an annoying loss-leader business that just wasted their specialists’ time. Now, however, many are making money selling objects for $2,000-$3,000; it’s just a matter of cutting transaction costs. “We have a new app with which you can take a picture, push a button, and it goes to a specialist, with a description. Then the specialist can decide if it might fit into an auction,” says Citron.
auctions  Sotheby's  Christie's  data  art  collectors  high_net_worth  partnerships  eBay  duopolies  digital_strategies  CRM  IT  margins  intermediaries  internal_systems  loss-leaders  transaction_costs  cost-cutting  know_your_customer  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  estate_planning  liquidity_events  online_auctions  digital_revolution 
november 2016 by jerryking
Time bomb lurks in VC term sheets
May 10, 2004 | The Investment Dealers' Digest | Britt Erica Tunick

Venture capital proved the saving grace for many a struggling start-up in the last few years, but as exit opportunities improve in both initial public offerings and mergers and acquisitions, many a start-up is about to come face to face with an unpleasant discovery: Their payouts may well be significantly smaller than they'd expected. instead of sitting down with an investment banker and doing the math to figure out exactly how investment terms will affect them at the time of a liquidity event, the majority of entrepreneurs merely look to their attorneys for assurance that investment terms generally look correct.
start_ups  surprises  vc  venture_capital  exits  ROI  term_sheets  liquidity_events 
august 2012 by jerryking
ÜBERRICH PROFITS FOR SMALL FIRMS
November 19, 2007 | Financial Post | Jonathan Ratner.

“We certainly think the market is big enough,” he said, highlighting the more than 7,000 Canadians with investable assets in excess of $20-million and 444,000 with between $1-million and $20- million. “We’re seeing a lot of liquidity events on both sides of the border of privately held companies being sold.” BMO estimates that in the
family_office  wealth_management  Northwood  Tom_McCullough  statistics  liquidity_events 
august 2012 by jerryking
It's hard to make a graceful, final exit
Nov. 23, 2011 | The Financial Times. (): News: p14. |Luke Johnson
Once you have sold you will certainly receive special attention thanks to your "liquidity event". Wealth managers and private bankers will call incessantly, hungry to look after your loot. Charities too will come knocking, hoping you will become a generous philanthropist. Long-forgotten friends will get in touch, happy to rekindle the acquaintance now that you are so evidently rich. New friends may suddenly emerge, keen to help you spend your wealth.

Consequently you will have to learn to say no rather more often, and to spot the phoneys and envy that usually appear. [jk...be conservative, be discerning, be picky, be selective, say "no"]

Over time, probably half of all entrepreneurs who've sold up start a new venture.
exits  entrepreneur  Luke_Johnson  serial_entrepreneur  say_"no"  succession  philanthropy  wealth_management  private_banking  liquidity_events  charities 
november 2011 by jerryking
Angel investors get cautious about which startups to nurture
Aug 30, 2002. | Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal. |
Jennifer Pittman. A caveat: It can be extremely difficult to secure a
second round of funding, If Round 2 doesn't come in time, angels risk
losing an investment. This reinforces the importance of due
diligence.......For angel investors who have been in the game awhile,
taking advantage of opportunities today is hampered by the lack of
liquidity events for previous investments. They often have to decide
between making new investments and supporting their old investments with
more cash.
angels  decision_making  due_diligence  funding  investing  investors  liquidity_events  ProQuest 
december 2010 by jerryking
The Art of the Sale - WSJ.com
March 17, 2008 WSJ article by ARDEN DALE spelling out the different ways of selling a company.
exits  owners  small_business  selling_a_business  liquidity_events 
february 2009 by jerryking

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