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Cut your to-do-list short (if you can’t, pretend to) | Fortythree.me
POSTED ON 15. SEPTEMBER 2019 BY FORTYTHREE

FOCUS, PRODUCTIVITY, TO DO LIST
culling  focus  GTD  lists  productivity  say_"no"  to-do 
11 weeks ago by jerryking
Five ways to avoid ever forgetting to pack something again
September 1, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | DOMINI CLARK.

THERE’S AN APP FOR THAT
If you haven’t travelled for some time, turn to the pros – which in this case means apps that help you pack. One to try is Packr, which generates a detailed list once you provide information such as your gender (male or female), whether the trip is for business or leisure, what activities you will be participating in (such as hiking, photography or formal dinner) and accommodation type (including cruise).

DIY LIST
Of course, we all have particular tastes and needs, so investing the time to create your own list might be worth it. If you’re a hard copy sort of person, create a multi-use grid-type version with items in the first column, followed by multiple columns for your “done" checkmarks. This style works particularly well in bullet journals.

NEVER UNPACK
Not completely, at least. If you have duplicates of certain items, simply keep them in your suitcase (after you’ve laundered them, if applicable) so they’re always ready to go. Some suggestions: an old bathing suit, a spare phone charger, basic toiletries, an umbrella, ear plugs and an empty water bottle. (This is an excellent use of all that free branded stuff you get at conferences and trade shows.)

VISUAL CUES
For things you can’t spare to keep stowed away, create visual cues. An eyeglass case reminds contact-lens wearers to pack a backup pair. A shoe bag makes sure you don’t forget heels. Other ideas include a jewellery roll, labelled packing cubes (underwear, shirts, etc) and your camera instruction manual (assuming you’re not using it regularly).

LEARN FROM DOING
Inevitably on some trip you will wish you had brought some item it had never occurred to you to pack before. Nail clippers, for instance, or perhaps a clothespin (great for keeping curtains closed). When that happens update your packing list straight away if possible, or set a reminder task to do so when you return home. Even better, toss one in before the bag goes back in the closest so it’s there for next time.
DIY  lists  lessons_learned  mobile_applications  packing  travel  tips  visual_cues 
september 2019 by jerryking
Work smarter, not harder. Here’s how
July 29, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by KIRA VERMOND, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL.

Suzanne Andrew, a freelance writer in Vancouver, took stock of her growing number of deadlines. One client wanted her to complete 26 profiles – articles that describe an individual or organization – in one month.

“I love writing profiles, but when I looked at the amount of work, it felt crushing,” she says.

Rather than brace herself for 18-hour days, all-nighters and inevitable burnout, Ms. Andrew took a different approach. She paused and then came up with a game plan.

“I’d worked as a project manager in the past and found that what worked best when managing other people was to create work-back schedules and milestone deadlines,” she says. “As a freelancer I was used to simply working to deadline, but realized I could make things easier and less stressful if I acted as my own project manager.”.....Ms. Andrew created a work-back schedule that outlined exactly how many interviews she had to conduct, plus a daily writing quota to meet the overall deadline. Once she met her daily target, she could stop work for the day and rest.

Here are a few pointers.....

1. WORK WITH YOUR ATTENTION LEVELS
Not every moment of the day is created equal when it comes to feeling sharp and productive. Our brains can only handle so much focused work time. Everyone has three levels of attention: proactive, active and inactive.

Feeling proactive? You’re in the zone: Take advantage of those times each day. Active times are best spent on less focused tasks like addressing emails or making a phone call.

And those inactive times? “Your brain is cooked,” You should probably be taking a mental break, going for a walk or getting a cup of coffee. Even just doing low-priority, repetitive work like filing is a good idea.”
Work with your brain’s energy levels. Don’t fight them and push yourself through those inactive times.

2. PLAN THE NIGHT BEFORE
Don’t allow your inbox become your to-do list. Instead, take 10 minutes at the end of the workday and create tomorrow’s action plan. What’s most important? What must get done? The next morning, look at that list and work on the most vital tasks before even thinking about firing up e-mail.

3. THINK LIKE A SMOKER
Pay attention to the way smokers take their breaks: They leave the building, go outside and even socialize.
“I’m a big believer in quality breaks,” she says. “How you take your break is as important as [taking] a break.”Get up. Move. Take in some fresh air and talk to people. You’ll come back more refreshed and proactive.

4. TRY THE POMODORO TECHNIQUE
....a productivity method, developed by a business consultant named Francesco Cirillo in the 1980s. (Pomodoro means “tomato” in Italian, a nod to old-school, plastic timers shaped like tomatoes.) The method dictates that you set a timer for a short amount of time – say, 25 or 30 minutes – and then focus on one task without interruption. Once the timer goes off, take a short break. Then, if needed, you do it again. Commit to going deep for 25 - 90 minutes (jk: sustained inquiry),” “It’s amazing when we consciously choose to do one thing, and one thing only, how much we get done.”
action_plans  attention  attention_spans  best_practices  focus  lists  monotasking  Pomodoro  preparation  priorities  productivity  project_management  slack_time  sustained_inquiry  thinking_backwards  thinking_deliberatively  timeouts  timing  to-do  work-back_schedules  work_smarter 
july 2019 by jerryking
Rolling Stone Ronnie Wood on the art of the set list
NOVEMBER 23, 2018 | Michael Hann | Michael Hann.

The nature of the set list — the selection of songs an artist chooses to perform in concert — is problematic. What is it for? To satisfy the performer’s artistic urges? To promote their latest release? Is it simply to provide people who might have paid a great deal of money for a ticket with the most satisfying entertainment possible?

In a new book, Rolling Stones guitarist Ronnie Wood has collected the set lists he handwrites for the band’s rehearsals, and then for shows. At first it was just for fun, Wood tells me; he had always loved calligraphy. But soon his artworks began to serve a practical purpose. “The next thing I know, I come into rehearsals and they’re going round the walls,” he says, “and the rest of the boys are going, ‘Have we played “Fool to Cry?” ’ ‘Yeah, we played it on Tuesday.’ The boys are starting to use it as a reference, which is great, because when I started doing it, Mick [Jagger] used to come up to me and go, ‘Ronnie, stop writing that bloody list, and get on with the songs.’ ”

The resulting book, The Rolling Stones Set Lists, captures the huge range of songs the Stones will bring to life during one of their tours — about 80 for a show of 19 or 20 songs. It also gives the rest of us some clues as to the rules of writing the dream set list.
books  concerts  lists  live_performances  music  songs  rollingstones 
november 2018 by jerryking
How One Silicon Valley C.E.O. Masters Work-Life Balance - The New York Times
By Bee Shapiro
Aug. 24, 2018

Daily Lists
I have a tomorrow list that I make the night before. I write down the three things I have to accomplish the next day. I try to wait until I get to the office before I’ll crack that open. I used to have a more organic approach, and my system just broke. With the complexities of the C.E.O. life — board calls, meetings, traveling and trying to be there for your family — you need a system.

Work Philosophies
This guy Tony Schwartz wrote a book that said: Time is a finite resource and energy is renewable. This was profound for me. For example, I enjoy the act of staying fit. It feels good, and the results are palpable. If I’m not getting exercise and seven hours of sleep, I’m not as good, so I view it as essential.

I also set themes throughout the week [JCK: thinking in *themes* or *layers* or *levels*]. I borrowed this from Jack Dorsey. It helps me and the people on my team minimize the content twitching that goes on. So if Monday is themed for business matters, and Thursday is more for recruiting, everyone knows. Content twitching is one of the reasons we feel overwhelmed and maybe not as productive. We’re constantly content twitching between apps and topics.
CEOs  Evernote  exercise  focus  Jack_Dorsey  metacognition  productivity  routines  Silicon_Valley  thinking  thinking_deliberatively  to-do  lists  finite_resources  Tony_Schwartz  work_life_balance  GTD  think_threes  personal_energy  overwhelmed  self-mastery  squirrel-like_behaviour  systematic_approaches 
august 2018 by jerryking
What It Was Like to Finally Write My Will
April 3, 2018 | The New York Times | John Schwartz

Will to-do list
Get a will. Really. Dying without one — “intestate” — is a drag for everyone.

Get a lawyer. Unless your life is wonderfully uncomplicated, you’ll want the help of an adviser. Even if you do it yourself, have an attorney look over your work.

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Continue reading the main story
Decide on your beneficiaries, and make sure your insurance policies and other investments are in agreement with what your will says.

Name an executor. It’s a tough and thankless job, so get someone with good judgment; this person can be paid out of your estate.

Got young kids? Name a guardian. If not, the courts will appoint one; why not take care of this essential matter ahead of time?

Secure your paperwork. Once the documents are done, put them in a safe place and make sure your relatives know how to find it.

Revisit it every five years. The world changes; your will should, too.
estate_planning  personal_finance  lists  wills  heirs 
april 2018 by jerryking
How to Build a Successful Team - Business Guides - The New York Times
By Adam Bryant

Make a Plan
You need a clear and measurable goal for what you want to accomplish.

HIRING WELL ISN'T ENOUGH - Hiring the right people is the most important part of building a strong team, of course, and delegating to give people more autonomy is a powerful motivator.

But managing a team is not that simple. Leaders have to play a far more hands-on role to make sure the group works well together and remains focused on the right priorities.

CREATE A CLEAR MAP - Leaders owe their teams an answer to .....“Where are we going and how are we going to get there?” In other words, what is the goal and how are we going to measure progress along the way? ..... What does success look like? If you were to set up a scoreboard to track success over time, what would it measure?

The trouble often starts when leaders start listing five or seven or 11 priorities. As Jim Collins, the author of the best-selling management books “Good to Great” and “Built to Last,” is fond of saying: “If you have more than three priorities, you don’t have any.”

HAVE A SHARED SCOREBOARD - Another benefit of having a simple plan is that it creates a shared goal that will offset the tendency of people to identify themselves as part of smaller groups. Think of a football team, for example. There are many “tribes” within a team – offense and defense, linemen and receivers, running backs and defensive backs. But because the goal of the team is clear, and there’s an external scoreboard to track progress, there is a greater sense of “us” on the team than the “us and them” dynamic that can often divide colleagues in companies.

“Metrics are actually the way that you can harmonize a large number of people, whether it’s dozens or even thousands,

YOU MAY FEEL LIKE A BROKEN RECORD--Once you have a simple plan... keep reminding your team of the priorities, even if it can feel repetitive. ....“You say something seven times and they haven’t heard you,” he said. “Until they start making jokes about how often you repeat it, they haven’t internalized it.”

Rules of the Road
You’ll need a set of values, behaviors and cultural guardrails so that everybody knows how to work together.

CREATE YOUR TEAM'S CULTURE

All families have values, even if they aren’t discussed explicitly. There are certain behaviors that are encouraged and discouraged — like rules of the road — for how everyone is going to (try to) get along and spend their time. ...As a leader, you can take a laissez-faire approach and hope the team meshes well over time. Or you can look for opportunities to set some shared guidelines for how people will work together.

There are no hard and fast rules for developing the cultural values of a team. In some cases, the founder of a company will issue them to employees. In others, top executives will turn the exercise over to employees to make it a bottom-up effort.

...AND STICK TO IT
teams  howto  lists  specificity  sticktoitiveness  shared_goals  cynicism  Jim_Collins  organizational_culture  values  repetition  priorities  metrics  subordinates  guardrails  the_right_people  cultural_values  tribes 
december 2017 by jerryking
To-Do List Apps: 5 Easy Tricks for Using Them Better
Oct. 12, 2017 | WSJ | By Chris Kornelis.

Evernote, an organizational app includes a myriad to-do list capabilities and allows the dispensing with conventional written lists.

Best practices:

* Empty Your Human Brain Into Your Digital Brain
“Your brain did not evolve to remember, remind and prioritize beyond about four things,” “Your head is for having ideas but not for holding them. So get all the ideas out, not just part of them. Otherwise, you won’t trust your head and you won’t trust your list.”

The Things 3 app is uniquely set up in this regard: The app, a complete overhaul of which was released last spring, has an “Inbox” specifically designed for a brain dump.

Put any idea or task into the Inbox—or even direct Siri to put a thought in the Inbox—and leave the item there. When you’re ready to get organized, mouse-click each Inbox idea or task and drag it to the specific list where it belongs, or schedule a time to complete the task.

* Detail the Whole Task
“Most people’s to-do lists don’t work very well because they don’t specify an action to be taken for each item. Put actionable items into your app—input “Make a reservation at The Cheesecake Factory for Mom’s birthday,” rather than something that requires even 10 seconds of analysis, such as “Mom’s Birthday.”

Trello, an app that allows users to drag-and-drop digital cards onto various vertical boards, makes it easy to visualize every one of your to-dos at a glance and make sure each is actionable. But the onus is on you to do so.

* Write Down When and Where You’re Going to Complete the Task
E.J. Masicampo, co-author of a paper exuberantly titled “Consider It Done!: Plan Making Can Eliminate the Cognitive Effects of Unfulfilled Goals,” says one of the biggest to-do list mistakes people make is failing to commit to a time frame to accomplish each of the tasks on their lists. “If your strategy is to go to the list and pick something to do,” he said, “eventually your list becomes a graveyard of things that you never felt like doing.

* Embrace Anxiety and Satisfaction
Merely writing down a to-do task can give you a feeling of having made progress. But Mr. Masicampo cautions against letting that give you a false sense of completion. “There’s a balance,” he said. “You want to have some anxiety, otherwise you won’t work at all.” And, of course, it’s far more satisfying to cross a finished task off a list.

* It Could Come to This: Delete the App
Some people are not ready to give up paper, and that’s OK: “I know a bunch of tech people who are going back to paper because there are fewer clicks. It’s easy input and output. You don’t need to slow yourself down too much to use it. Tech sort of pretends that it’s going to speed things up, but it doesn’t.”
David_Allen  Evernote  false_sense_of_completion  GTD  lists  mobile_applications  paper-based  productivity  Things_3  tips  To-Do  Trello  work-back_schedules 
october 2017 by jerryking
50 Smartest Companies 2016
Our editors pick the 50 companies that best combine innovative technology with an effective business model.

June 21, 2016

Each year we identify 50 companies that are “smart” in the way they create new opportunities. Some of this year’s stars are large companies, like Amazon and Alphabet, that are using digital technologies to redefine industries. Others are wrestling with technological changes: companies like Microsoft, Bosch, Toyota, and Intel. Also on the list are ambitious startups like 23andMe, a pioneer in consumer-accessible DNA testing; 24M, a reinventor of battery technology; and Didi Chuxing, a four-year-old ride-hailing app that’s beating Uber in the Chinese market.
MIT  lists  start_ups  large_companies  innovation  technology  business_models  job_search  23andMe 
june 2016 by jerryking
Eleven things ultra-productive people do differently - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 31, 2015 | Entrepreneur.com | TRAVIS BRADBERRY.

1. They Never Touch Things Twice
2. They Get Ready for Tomorrow. Before they leave the office, productive people end each day by preparing for the next. It only takes a few minutes and it’s a great way to end your workday.
3. They Eat Frogs “Eating a frog” is the best antidote for procrastination, and ultra-productive people start each morning with this tasty treat. In other words, they do the least appetizing, most dreaded item on their to-do list before they do anything else. After that, they’re freed up to tackle the stuff that excites and inspires them.
4. They Fight The Tyranny Of The Urgent
5. They Stick to the Schedule During Meetings
6. They Say No. [jk...be conservative, be discerning, be picky, be selective, say "no"]
7. They Only Check E-mail At Designated Times.
8. They Don’t Multitask!
9. They Go off The Grid. This strategy is a bulletproof way to complete high-priority projects.
10. They Delegate
11. They Put Technology to Work for Them Investigate apps like IFTTT, which sets up contingencies on your smart phone and alerts you when something important happens.
productivity  GTD  habits  mobile_applications  delegation  discipline  preparation  multitasking  technology  off-grid  focus  say_"no"  monotasking  lists  affirmations 
august 2015 by jerryking
WWE champ, fitness goddess Trish Stratus shares how she kicks butt - The Globe and Mail
Sep. 21 2014 | The Globe and Mail | COURTNEY SHEA.

Here, some of her other secrets to success.

(1) The calm in the middle of the ring. Take time every day to disconnect is so important for having perspective. For Trish Stratus, hot yoga is her stress-eliminating device.

(2) Preparedness is a weapon. Trish's mentor, Robert Kennedy,the then publisher of magazines Oxygen and MuscleMag, gave her the opportunity to do a photo shoot. He told her about it two months in advance, set her up with a trainer and said, “Go get ready for it.” Trish's formula for success, is "preparedness meets opportunity". Many people are given opportunities in life, but they aren’t able or willing to prepare for them. Opportunities happen more often then you think but you have to be ready for them.

(3) I am woman, hear me headlock. Setbacks occur, but keep busting your butt out there, keep working, keep working, and eventually people will realize and recognize your contribution. Sometimes having to overcome hurdles is also a chance to make a mark.

(4) To get it right, write it down. Take notes. Make (to-do) lists. Keeping track of things can enhance awareness, mindfulness, and even inspiration.

(5) Authenticity matters (even in scripted wrestling). The best wrestlers– the ones that have longevity and resonate most with the audience – are almost always when it’s an amped-up version of the actual personality.
authenticity  calm  disconnecting  fitness  hard_work  hotties  inspiration  journaling  lessons_learned  lists  mentoring  mindfulness  models  note_taking  opportunities  personal_energy  preparation  self-awareness  setbacks  To-Do  readiness  women  yoga 
september 2014 by jerryking
45 Ultimate Tips For Men. Number 40 Will Help You Go Far In Life.
45 Ultimate Tips For Men. Number 40 Will Help You Go Far In Life.
18th March 2014
advice  lists  tips  inspiration  masculinity  relationships 
march 2014 by jerryking
More Reflection, Less Action
February 14, 2014 |NYT | By TONY SCHWARTZ.

Observation from President Obama, caught on an open mike during a stroll with Prime Minister David Cameron of Britain in 2008:

“The most important thing you need to do [in this job] is to have big chunks of time during the day when all you’re doing is thinking.”

Judgment is grounded in discernment, subtlety and nuance.... Good judgment grows out of reflection, and reflection requires the sort of quiet time that gets crowded out by the next demand.

Regular reflection also provides the space in which to decide what not to do. At the companies I visit, no topic comes up more frequently than prioritizing....Time to reflect is what makes it possible to prioritize.... a tools that ensures reflection and prioritization is an old-fashioned handwritten to-do list, with a twist. Download everything that’s on your mind – not just calls to make and emails to send, but also ideas you want to explore, conflicts you haven’t resolved, and longer-term projects you intend to pursue...If you can’t decide whether something is worth your time, I try to stop and answer two reflective questions – a task that ends up saving rather than costing time.

1. Could someone else do this just as well or better than I can? If so, I try to turn it over.

2. Is the time and energy I invest going to produce anything I’ll still consider worth having done a month from now?

We need less conventional wisdom and more genuine wisdom; less sheer output and more insights that add enduring value.
time-management  reflections  wisdom  work_life_balance  insights  priorities  lists  GTD  judgment  strategic_thinking  Obama  David_Cameron  thinking  timeouts  meditation  contemplation  discernment  subtlety  personal_energy  slack_time  monotasking  sustained_inquiry  Tony_Schwartz  nuanced 
february 2014 by jerryking
Activity Does Not Always Equal Productivity - NYTimes.com
October 11, 2013 | NYT | By TONY SCHWARTZ.

"Don't Confuse Motion and Progress"

We're more multitasking more today than you ever have before...
The real issue is whether you’re getting the right things done....what stands in the way of your being truly productive? What's the right balance between attending to what’s truly urgent and focusing on what’s less pressing but will most likely add the most enduring value.
(1) You need more sleep than you think, and maybe much more. 95 percent of us need at least seven to eight hours of sleep to feel fully rested.
(2) Do the most important thing first. The pull to e-mail is powerful and Pavlovian. By checking your e-mail first, you effectively turn over your agenda to others. It is far better to decide what your agenda ought to be the night before and make that the first thing you focus on at work, without interruption, for up to 90 minutes. If you must check e-mail when you get up because there are urgent messages, scan quickly for anything that truly cannot wait an hour. Answer those, ignore the rest, and then do what’s truly most important.
(3) Stop pushing through. Human beings are designed to operate in 90-minute cycles...By focusing more intensely for shorter periods, you’ll get more done, in less time, at a higher level of quality, more sustainably.
(4) Get it off your mind. With so much coming at us all the time, it’s hardly surprising that our instinctive default is to do whatever feels most urgent and easiest to address. The consequence, of course, is that we often keep putting off what’s most challenging and then lack the energy to do it by the time we finally get to it. BELIEVE IN LISTS, first and foremost as a means of downloading everything that’s on your mind to get it off your mind....keep all lists in one place. For example, what I want to do that day, over the next week, and in the longer term. I also keep a list of e-mails I need to send; calls I intend to make; ideas I want to explore further; issues I want to discuss with specific colleagues; and even things that are making me feel anxious... The other value I derive from detailed lists is that they help clarify what I ought not to be focused on. By having everything in one place, I can much more easily decide what’s truly important and what’s not. Half the value of having a list is to make it more obvious what not to do. I might have 50 to 100 items on my lists, but I typically give explicit priority to three or fewer in any given day.
(5) Make it matter. Finally, and simply, ask yourself a simple question before you begin any activity: “Is this the best way I could be spending my time?” If the answer is no, don’t do it.
work_life_balance  productivity  lists  effectiveness  GTD  busy_work  e-mail  Tony_Schwartz  multitasking  sleep  timeouts  priorities  affirmations  monotasking  To-Do 
october 2013 by jerryking
W100: Canada’s top women entrepreneurs
October 14, 2008 | PROFITguide.com | by Jennifer Myers ||
women  entrepreneur  lists  best_of 
march 2013 by jerryking
Six Things to Put on Your To-Not-Do List - Forbes
DON’T DO #1: Spend time thinking about anything beyond your control. If you can’t do anything about it, drop it.
DON’T DO #2: Waste a second trying to change somebody else.
DON’T DO #3: Do anything you can delegate to somebody else.
DON’T DO #4: Focus on fixing one-time occurrences.
DON’T DO #5: Spend time with people you don’t trust or people you can’t count on.
DON’T DO #6: Put effort into anything that will clearly have little or no impact.
lists  tips  Managing_Your_Career  span_of_control  delegation  distrust  sense_of_control  productivity  affirmations  GTD  ineffectual  personal_energy  one-time_events  beyond_one's_control  high-impact 
march 2013 by jerryking
Looking for the 'Next Big Thing'? Ranking the Top 50 Start-Ups - WSJ.com
September 27, 2012, 4:22 p.m. ET

Looking for the 'Next Big Thing'? Ranking the Top 50 Start-Ups
This Year's List Shows a Focus on Business Tech as Health Care and Energy Fade

Article
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By ZORAN BASICH And EMILY MALTBY
start_ups  lists  small_business 
september 2012 by jerryking
The Ten Things Everyone Should Know About Science
Nov 23 2007| FT.com | By Clive Cookson; Illustrations by
Ingram Pinn. Scientists complain that, while they would be ashamed to
admit knowing nothing about Jane Austen’s novels, literary colleagues
get away with total ignorance of relativity and quantum theory...There
are myriad practical reasons why people should have a basic knowledge of
science. One is that a scientifically savvy population is less likely
to fall victim to fraud and superstition, from astrology to quack cures.
And when so many contemporary political issues (from global warming to
embryo research) have a big scientific component, voters and politicians
need to understand what is really at stake. The icon of transformation
from scientific ignorance to wisdom is the travel writer Bill Bryson.
Shamed about not knowing a proton from a protein, or a quasar from a
quark, he spent 3 yrs researching what he was missing. The result was A
Short History of Nearly Everything, the best science book of the 21st
century so far.
books  fraud  ignorance  Jane_Austen  lists  literacy  proteins  quantum_computing  science_&_technology  scientifically_literate  superstition 
march 2011 by jerryking
The 41 Places to Go in 2011 - NYTimes.com
By THE NEW YORK TIMES
Published: January 7, 2011
travel  lists 
january 2011 by jerryking
Small Business: Five Tips for Managing Your To-Do List - WSJ.com
JANUARY 4, 2011 Five Tips for Managing Your To-Do List
by MIKE MICHALOWICZ
lists  productivity  Managing_Your_Career  tips 
january 2011 by jerryking
Three Tips for Managing Your Time at Work
Dec. 20 2010 | Forbes | by Jessica Kleiman. 1. Create an
e-mail free zone. According to time management expert Julie Morgenstern,
( Never Check E-Mail in the Morning), set aside at least an hour each
day where you don’t look at your e-mail. She recommends it be first
thing in the morning so you can dedicate that time to working on
strategy and big ideas.
2. Write your to-do list at night. Before you leave the office or shut
down your laptop for the evening, jot down your assignments for the
following day.
3. Get clear on your priorities. Another phrase Morgenstern uses often
is “dance close to the revenue line,” meaning tend to the things that
have the biggest impact on your business first and the rest can wait. We
live in an age of urgency, where everything seems important and people
are looking for instant gratification.
clarity  e-mail  GTD  high-impact  instant_gratification  lists  preparation  priorities  productivity  time-management  tips  urgency 
december 2010 by jerryking
Foreign Policy's Second Annual List of the 100 Top Global Thinkers | Foreign Policy
DECEMBER 2010 | The FP Top 100 Global Thinkers. Foreign Policy
presents a unique portrait of 2010's global marketplace of ideas and
the thinkers who make them.
thought_leadership  best_of  lists  globalization  foreign_policy  booklists  policymakers  policymaking 
december 2010 by jerryking
The Next Establishment | The New Establishment 2010 | Business
October 2010 | Vanity Fair | by Peter Newcomb•Adrienne Gaffney
lists  movingonup  profile 
october 2010 by jerryking
Time Management Strategies for Professionals with ADD, long post, print out - ADD Forums - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Support and Information Resources Community
March 2, 2004 | Wall Street Journal | By Kris Maher. Plan
your workday the night before and come up with a list of items and the
order in which they need to be accomplished. This simple action can have
a powerful effect, says Mr. Wetmore, comparing most people's sense of
priorities to a pack of greyhounds put down on a racetrack and ready to
run off in any direction. The list, he says, acts like "that little
rabbit that forms the direction to go in."
time-management  strategies  productivity  preparation  lists  affirmations  priorities  timing  JCK 
february 2010 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: Is it too late to catch up?
Posted by Seth Godin on December 03, 2009. What if your
organization or your client has done nothing? What if they've just
watched the last fourteen years go by? No real website, no social media,
no permission assets. What if now they're ready and they ask your
advice? And, by the way, they have no real cash to spend...Here's a list
of Seth's top ten things to consider doing:

......*Start a newsletter for your vendors. Email them regular updates about what you're doing, what's selling and what problems are going on internally that they might be able to help you with.
*Do not approve any project that isn't run on Basecamp.
*Get a white board and put it in the break room. On it, have someone update: how many people subscribe to the newsletter, how many people visit the website, how many inbound requests come in by phone, how long it takes customer service to answer an email and how often your brand names are showing up on Twitter every day.
*Don't have any meetings about your web strategy. Just do stuff. First you have to fail, then you can improve.
*Refuse to cede the work to consultants. You don't outsource your drill press or your bookkeeping or your product design. If you're going to catch up, you must (all of you) get good at this, and you only accomplish that by doing it.
The problem is no longer budget. The problem is no longer access to tools.
Basecamp  Seth_Godin  UFSC  lists  tips  online_marketing 
december 2009 by jerryking
Salad
Updated Oct. 21, 2009 | New York Times | By Steven Stern
salads  recipes  lists 
november 2009 by jerryking
One Hundred Things Restaurant Staffers Should Never Do (Part 1) - You’re the Boss Blog - NYTimes.com
October 29, 2009 | New York Times | by Bruce Buschel. A modest
list of do's and don’ts for servers at the seafood restaurant Buschel
is building.
etiquette  restaurants  advice  lists  customer_service 
november 2009 by jerryking

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