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jerryking : litigation   54

How a private equity boom fuelled the world’s biggest law firm
June 6, 2019 | Financial Times | James Fontanella-Khan and Sujeet Indap in New York and Barney Thompson in London.

Jeff Hammes took the helm at a Chicago-based law firm called Kirkland & Ellis in 2010, with the aim of turning it into a world-beater, few in the industry thought he stood a chance.......known as a good litigation firm in Chicago with a decent mid-market private equity practice, in the blockbuster dealmaking world, however, the firm was largely irrelevant. Nobody took them seriously on Wall Street.....Fuelled by explosive growth in private equity, aggressive poaching of talent and most of all, a business model that resembles a freewheeling investment bank, Kirkland has become the highest-grossing law firm in the world.....This rise reflects the shift in the financial world’s balance of power since the financial crisis. Investment banks, the dominant force before 2008, have been eclipsed by private equity firms, which now sit on hundreds of billions of dollars of investment funds.

Kirkland thrived by hitching itself to this dealmaking activity. The firm presents with a relentless — many say ruthless — focus on growth, a phenomenal work ethic and a desire to up-end what it sees as a lazy hierarchy. Key questions: can its winning streak can continue? Will its private equity clients continue to prosper? how will Kirkland cope if and when the private equity boom ends? And can a firm with such a hard-charging culture survive in the long run?....Robert Smith’s Vista Equity has grown to manage assets from $1bn to $46 in a decade while working with Kirkland.....To establish Kirkland as a major player, Mr Hammes turned his attention to recruitment. ....poaching proven M&A experts and targeting all areas of dealmaking.....To entice the best lawyers to join its ranks, Kirkland managed to exploit a structural rigidity in its more traditional white-shoe and magic circle rivals. A dwindling but still significant number of elite firms remunerate equity partners using a “lockstep” model......
Kirkland sought rising stars in their late thirties who were at the bottom of this ladder, stuck in the queue for the highest share of profits. Part of its pitch was money — “With compensation, we can go as high as we want,” says one partner — but the other part was an almost unprecedented level of autonomy.
Big_Law  booming  business_development  Chicago  compensation  concentration_risk  dealmakers  deal-making  eat_what_you_kill  financial_crises  growth  hard-charging  high-end  hiring  howto  hustle  Kirkland_Ellis  law  law_firms  litigation  mid-market  organizational_culture  poaching  private_equity  recruiting  Robert_Smith  superstars  talent  turnover  Vista  Wall_Street  winner-take-all  work_ethic  world-class 
june 2019 by jerryking
Apple and Qualcomm’s Billion-Dollar Staredown
April 13, 2019 | WSJ | By Tripp Mickle and Asa Fitch.

Apple has called Qualcomm a monopoly and said Mr. Mollenkopf has lied about settlement talks between the companies. Qualcomm has accused Apple of deceiving regulators around the world and stealing software to help a rival chip maker.

For two years, the companies have bickered over the royalties Apple pays to Qualcomm for its patents. Discord between the CEOs, who bring different management styles and principles to the table, has deepened the divide. They have dug into their positions as the dispute has escalated....Apple’s patent lawsuit against Qualcomm is set to go to trial—with both CEOs expected to testify in a case where billions of dollars are at stake. .....Cook’s view that Qualcomm’s licensing practices—taking a 5% share of most of the sales price of an iPhone—was just plain wrong, allowing the chip maker to profit off Apple innovations in display and camera technology.....
5G  Apple  CEOs  conflict_resolution  disputes  Intel  licensing  litigation  mobile_phones  patents  Qualcomm  royalties  semiconductors  smartphones  Steve_Mollenkopf  Tim_Cook 
april 2019 by jerryking
The Fashion Outlaw Dapper Dan
JUNE 3, 2017 | The New York Times | By BARRY MICHAEL COOPER.

Twenty-five years after luxury labels sued his Harlem
boutique out of existence, Gucci looks to him for inspiration......Things have come full circle. Litigation by luxury brands ran Dapper Dan’s Boutique out of business in the ’90s, and now here comes a major fashion house trying to grab the attention of a generation steeped in hip-hop by finding inspiration in a onetime fashion outlaw...... last week after Gucci unveiled a jacket that looked very much like one he designed nearly three decades ago for the Olympic sprinter Diane Dixon.

The fur-lined piece with balloon sleeves created by Mr. Day in the 1980s made use of the Louis Vuitton logo without the brand’s permission. The new Gucci jacket, designed by Gucci’s creative director, Alessandro Michele, remakes the Dapper Dan jacket, but with the interlocking double-G Gucci logo in place of the Louis Vuitton markings......Gucci [now] acknowledges its debt to the designer......In addition to Gucci’s recent salutation, the Museum of Modern Art plans to include Mr. Day’s work in its fall show “Items.” In an email, MoMA’s senior curator of architecture and design, Paola Antonelli, called Mr. Day a “trailblazer” who “showed even the guardians of the original brands the power of creative appropriation, the new life that an authentically ‘illicit’ use could inject into a stale logo, as well as the commercial potential of a stodgy monogram’s walk on the hip-hop side.”.....“What Dap did was take what those major fashion labels were doing and made them better,” said the rapper Darold Ferguson, Jr., who goes by the stage name ASAP Ferg and whose father, Darold Sr., worked at the boutique in the ’80s. “He taught them how to use their designs in a much more effective way. Dap curated hip-hop culture.”

Steve Stoute, the chief executive of the marketing firm Translation, said: “I think what Dap did, he actually taught an entire generation how to engage with luxury brands. Luxury brands, at that point, were not for us. They didn’t even have sizing for black people. So every time I walk into Louis Vuitton to buy a pair of sneakers, or buy a pair of pants in my size, I know they’re only doing it because of Dapper Dan.”....experiences with poverty growing up [crummy shoes] gave him an understanding of how clothes reflect social status.... the need to dress to impress is part of a generational mind-set for many black men who grew up in Harlem......Clothes designing sounds fascinating, but it’s hard work. Folks don’t realize that there are limitations in the body form. We’re humans: We have arms, legs, chest. The exciting part of designing clothes is that you can be really creative within the context of those limitations.”.......Samira Nasr, the fashion director for Elle magazine, likened Mr. Day’s work to that of the innovative hip-hop D.J.s of the era, such as Jason Mizell, a client of Mr. Day’s. Mr. Mizell, who died in 2002, created beats for Run-DMC under the name Jam Master Jay. “Sampling was taking existing music and slicing it to recreate new sounds for original lyrics,” Ms. Nasr wrote in an email. “Dap was sampling in a way. He was taking existing fabrications and breathing new life and beauty into them.”
litigation  luxury  brands  clothing_labels  Gucci  Harlem  stylish  mens'_clothing  African-Americans  New_York_City  sampling  streetwise  '80s  '90s  inspiration  hip_hop  fashion  outlaws  design  retailers  knockoffs  copycats  creative_appropriation  underground_economy  crack_cocaine 
june 2017 by jerryking
Google vs. Uber: How One Engineer Sparked a War - WSJ
By Jack Nicas and Tim Higgins
Updated May 23, 2017

Anthony Levandowski started outside tech companies while working for Google, which alleges he took driverless-car secrets to a competitor.....Google parent Alphabet Inc. and Uber are embroiled in a legal fight over driverless-car technology, with Mr. Levandowski playing a starring role. The two firms, along with several other companies, are locked in a race to automate cars, a contest that could affect the future of transportation......Google’s approach [i.e. encouraging entrepreneurship amongst employees] helps it create new businesses, it also can spark disagreements between the company and its employees over who owns certain technology......Alphabet accuses Mr. Levandowski of stealing its trade secrets around driverless-car technology and bringing it to Uber, which he joined as its head of its driverless-car project last year after earning more than $120 million at Google. Alphabet has filed two arbitration claims against Mr. Levandowski and is suing Uber for allegedly conspiring with him.....
Google  Uber  automotive_industry  autonomous_vehicles  litigation  conflicts_of_interest  side_hustles  employment_contracts  intellectual_property  noncompete_agreements  start_ups  talent  Alphabet  trade_secrets  entrepreneurship  engineering 
may 2017 by jerryking
Apple, Samsung ready for latest patent faceoff - The Globe and Mail
MARTHA MENDOZA

SAN JOSE, CALIF. — The Associated Press

Published Sunday, Mar. 30 2014
Apple  Samsung  patents  litigation  intellectual_property 
april 2014 by jerryking
Pension Funds Sue on a Deal Gone Cold - NYTimes.com
February 24, 2014, 9:51 pm
Pension Funds Sue on a Deal Gone Cold
By RACHEL ABRAMS
Wall_Street  African-Americans  hedge_funds  litigation  Buddy_Fletcher  pension_funds 
february 2014 by jerryking
Patent Wars Erupt Again in Tech Sector - WSJ.com
By
Ashby Jones
connect
Nov. 3, 2013

After a brief hiatus for major new litigation, a joint venture owned by Apple Inc., AAPL +0.10% Apple Inc. U.S.: Nasdaq $520.53 +0.50+0.10% Nov 4, 2013 10:01 am Volume (Delayed 15m) : 9.66M P/E Ratio 13.03 Market Cap $467.89 Billion Dividend Yield 2.35% Rev. per Employee $2,127,850 52552051510a12p2p4p6p 11/03/13 Patent Wars Erupt Again in Tec... 11/01/13 Short Lines for Apple iPad Lau... 10/31/13 Morning MoneyBeat: Are Buyback... More quote details and news » Microsoft Corp. MSFT +0.49% , BlackBerry Ltd. BB.T -1.70% , Ericsson Inc. and Sony Corp. 6758.TO -11.13% launched a barrage of new lawsuits against a group of defendants that include Samsung Inc., GOOG -0.25% Samsung Electronics Co. 005930.SE -0.07% , LG Electronics Inc., 066570.SE +1.03% HTC Corp. 2498.TW +4.86% and Huawei Technologies Co.
litigation  patent_law  patents  Huawei  LG  HTC  Samsung  Google  Sony  Ericsson  BlackBerry  Microsoft 
november 2013 by jerryking
Caribbean Nations to Seek Reparations, Putting Price on Damage of Slavery - NYTimes.com
By STEPHEN CASTLE
Published: October 20, 2013

Fourteen Caribbean countries that once sustained that slave economy now want Mr. Hague to put his money where his mouth is.

Spurred by a sense of injustice that has lingered for two centuries, the countries plan to compile an inventory of the lasting damage they believe they suffered and then demand an apology and reparations from the former colonial powers of Britain, France and the Netherlands.

To present their case, they have hired a firm of London lawyers that this year won compensation from Britain for Kenyans who were tortured under British colonial rule in the 1950s.
slavery  reparations  Caribbean  United_Kingdom  litigation  injustice 
october 2013 by jerryking
Don’t expect BlackBerry’s patents to stay in Canada - The Globe and Mail
BARRIE McKENNA

OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail

Published Sunday, Sep. 29 2013

The way to extract real value from BlackBerry’s IP is to use the patents in cross-licensing deals between tech companies, allowing players to use each others’ technologies. Patents can also be used in litigation – either on offence to protect turf, or to defend against infringement by others.
Blackberry  patents  intellectual_property  cross-licensing  litigation 
october 2013 by jerryking
Book Review: Slingshot - WSJ.com
June 4, 2013 |WSJ | By DAVID KANSAS

Chipping Away at Success
Litigation as strategy isn't unfamiliar in the competitive high-tech world, where trampled companies turn to courts to slay the enemy.
book_reviews  semiconductors  AMD  Silicon_Valley  legal_strategies  litigation  books 
august 2013 by jerryking
What Are The Risks Of Suing Your Boss? - Orlando Sentinel
April 18, 1997| Wall Street Journal | By Hal Lancaster .

You Could Win The Battle But Lose The War. Career Experts Offer Some Advice To Consider.
litigation  Managing_Your_Career  Hal_Lancaster  managing_up  risks 
december 2012 by jerryking
Following Up With Dan Brown, Inventor of the Bionic Wrench - NYTimes.com
November 26, 2012, 7:00 (share with Paul Boldt)
Following Up With Dan Brown, Inventor of the Bionic Wrench
By GENE MARKS

we definitely need some changes if our country is ever going to protect our significant investments in innovation. Most people do not know it, but we have a double standard in the protection and punishment of intellectual property theft. Without going into all of the detail, the punishment for willful copyright and trademark infringement is a criminal penalty. This is a very strong deterrent for copyright and trademark infringement. The punishment for willful patent infringement is a civil case and not a criminal case. As it stands today, this piracy model for patent theft allows infringers to proceed unchecked for years in the marketplace, often destroying the market, business, and investment of the patent rights owner. The current system forces the victim to fight a protracted and expensive legal battle. If Congress were to simply make those cases of willful patent infringement a criminal case, and we began holding the responsible individuals and officers of the companies personally accountable — as it is in willful infringement of copyrights and trademarks — I believe these infringers would think long and hard before they risked infringing a patented product....Unfortunately, the sales cycle in this business runs well ahead of the delivery cycle. Pioneering a new product into a retailer is very challenging, especially when attempting to convince a buyer whose paradigm is almost totally based on purchasing imported products at very low costs. That is why we worked so hard with Sears to prove the viability of the product and sales program.
Sears  patents  patent_law  inventors  intellectual_property  litigation  sales_cycle  double_standards  delivery_cycle  new_products  retailers 
november 2012 by jerryking
Jenkins: The Jury Has Spoken—Think Different - WSJ.com
August 28, 2012, 7:07 p.m. ET

The Jury Has Spoken: Think Different
Samsung's loss is Microsoft's opportunity.

Microsoft is a pygmy in the smartphone business though, unlike Google, Microsoft troubled itself to design a smartphone operating system that does everything a smartphone must without being an iPhone knockoff.

Microsoft may genuinely have believed there's a better way than Apple's of organizing a user's interaction with a mobile device. Microsoft may have concluded there was no future in merely making another Apple knockoff, then trying (thanklessly) to give birth to a third app ecosystem around it.

Maybe Microsoft was just worried about lawsuit vulnerability. Whatever the reason (how's this for irony?), Microsoft was the company to "think different" and create a mobile operating system "for the rest of us"—i.e., an alternative to Apple's vision. The result is Windows Phone 8, the operating system behind the oft-praised but slow-selling Nokia Lumia 900....a too-weak patent system can be as bad for competition as a too-strong one. Until Friday's verdict, it was just too easy for Google-Samsung to gain a dominant share by copying Apple's innovations and giving them away for free. That's especially true of the subtle feedback Apple figured out how to provide users through a touch-screen. Google's business model, Apple could be forgiven for thinking, is more like piracy than competition.

Apple's lawsuits are not without strategic design, of course. The aim is to raise the cost to handset makers of using Google's "free" Android software—one reason Samsung, not Google, was the target of Apple's legal vendetta....But the verdict has an ironic potential. With Android seeming less "free," handset makers now have more incentive to get behind real innovation, such as Microsoft's promising but negligibly patronized operating system. Sooner rather than later, in other words, we might have a choice not just between Apple and fake Apple.

Microsoft and other innovators still face a monumental hurdle, it's true, in a lack of apps. What would really hasten the icejam breakup would be more decisions like one recently from the Financial Times.

The FT has decided to stop making Android or Apple apps or other ecosystem-specific apps in favor of a universal app riding on the mobile browser layer, using the tool set known as HTML5.

By HOLMAN W. JENKINS, JR.
Apple  Samsung  Microsoft  Holman_Jenkins  patents  patent_law  ecosystems  Android  HTML5  knockoffs  think_differently  legal_strategies  lawsuits  litigation 
august 2012 by jerryking
Apple Victory Shifts Power Balance - WSJ.com
August 26, 2012 | WSJ | By JESSICA E. VASCELLARO and DON CLARK
Jessica_E._Vascellaro  Apple  litigation  Samsung  Android  Google  juries 
august 2012 by jerryking
Mobile phones: Difference Engine: Copying the copier
Aug 6th 2012 | The Economist| by N.V.

The 73-year-old Judge Posner, who also teaches at Chicago Law School, is one of the founders of the legal school that interprets patent law in economic terms. His argument last June for refusing to ban Motorola’s products from the shelves, as Apple sought, was that “an injunction that imposes greater costs on the defendant than it confers benefits on the plaintiff reduces net social welfare”. That is the economic interpretation of patent law at work.

If, as it seems, Apple has had to resort to the courts to stifle competition and limit consumer choice, then it is a sad day for American innovation. That the company can do so with such impunity is an even sadder reflection of how dysfunctional the patent system in the United States has become.

The only reason why governments grant patents (and the monopoly rights they entail) is to promote innovation—in the hope of generating jobs and additional sources of revenue. Patents seek to do this by requiring the inventor to make prompt and full disclosure of the idea, so others may seek a licence to use it, or find ways to work around it. In exchange, the inventor is granted the right to exclude competitors for 20 years or so.

The cost to society of allowing a monopoly to flourish has long been assumed to be outweighed by the benefits that accrue from encouraging individuals to spend their own resources inventing useful things that did not exist before. In short, patents have been seen as a necessary evil for fostering innovation.

That assumption is now being challenged. Indeed, a debate has been raging in the United States over whether patents—especially those granted for protecting software ideas and business processes—help or hinder innovation.
patents  patent_law  Apple  Samsung  mobile_phones  smartphones  litigation  Richard_A._Posner  innovation  uChicago 
august 2012 by jerryking
Rich Karlgaard: Apple's Lawsuit Sent a Message to Google - WSJ.com
August 26, 2012 | WSJ | By RICH KARLGAARD
Rich Karlgaard: Apple's Lawsuit Sent a Message to Google
To Steve Jobs, Android stirred unpleasant memories of Microsoft Windows.
Apple  Samsung  litigation  Rich_Karlgaard  Google 
august 2012 by jerryking
Apple Gets Decisive Win in Patent Case - WSJ.com
August 24, 2012 | WSJ | By JESSICA E. VASCELLARO.

Apple, which cited more than 28 Samsung products, sued Samsung last year and accused the South Korean company of infringing seven patents. Samsung fired back, alleging that some iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch models infringed up to five patents....Apple has won big...being awarded $1.05 billion in damages and providing ammunition for more legal attacks on mobile-device rivals.

Jurors Friday found that Samsung infringed all but one of the seven patents at issue in the case—a patent covering the physical design of the iPad. They found all seven of Apple's patents valid—despite Samsung's attempts to have them thrown out. They also decided Apple didn't violate any of the five patents Samsung asserted against it.

The damage award is shy of Apple's request for more than $2.5 billion, but much larger than Samsung's estimates and still ranking among the largest intellectual-property awards on record.
litigation  Apple  Samsung  patent_law  patents  smartphones  intellectual_property 
august 2012 by jerryking
Getting a Better Severance Deal
November 1994 | Working Woman | BY STEPHEN M. POLLAN AND MARK LEVINE.

Severance packages are more negotiable than you may think. Treat them as preliminary offers, not done deals, and use whatever leverage you have. Do not sign a release—or even a statement that you've been terminated—at the initial meeting, when you receive the news. Insist on postponing all decisions to a subsequent meeting with both your direct supervisor and someone from personnel. Say you need the time to digest the news or even that you feel too emotional to continue. Then use this grace period to de1ermine what you really need in tenns of money and other benefits. Draft a memo outlining your dream severance package, listing a reason for each request. And if you suspect that you're being discriminated against—maybe everyone being dismissed is over 40 or female--contact the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (800-669-4000) or a labor lawyer. When you finally go into your second meeting, try to set aside your hurt and anger. Treat this like any other business negotiation. Be firm but flexible in your requests. and know where to draw your bottom line. Keep in mind that both you and your supervisor want to wrap the matter up as quickly as possible.
litigation  negotiations  decision_making  decision_trees  exits  managing_up  severance 
august 2012 by jerryking
Several Suits Reveal Risks in Serving Asia's Rich
November 19, 2008 | WSJ | By TOM WRIGHT in Jakarta and LAURA SANTINI in Hong Kong.
high_net_worth  Singapore  litigation  private_banking  Indonesia  risks  Southeast_Asia 
august 2012 by jerryking
Google at Center of Samsung-Apple Phone Patent Trial -
July 30, 2012 | WSJ.com | By JESSICA E. VASCELLARO.
Samsung Case Is a Proxy for Google
litigation  Apple  Samsung  Jessica_E._Vascellaro  Google 
july 2012 by jerryking
Kleiner Loses Bid for Arbitration in Discrimination Case - NYTimes.com
July 20, 2012, 2:30 pm14 Comments
Kleiner Loses Bid for Arbitration in Discrimination Case
By DAVID STREITFELD
Kleiner_Perkins  litigation  sexual_harassment  Ellen_Pao  gender_discrimination  arbitration 
july 2012 by jerryking
The Big War Over Cuties, the Small Fruit - WSJ.com
July 13, 2012 | WSJ | By MIRIAM JORDAN

The Big War Over a Small Fruit
Simple but clever ideas have made America great. Now a small seedless fruit has become an emblem of marketing in our era. Will your local supermarket ever be the same again?
fruits  marketing  supermarkets  branding  brands  litigation  Lynda_Resnick  agribusiness  citrus 
july 2012 by jerryking
Why Are Hedge Funds Allowed to Invest in Litigation?
Jul 3 2012 | The Atlantic | Lisa Rickard.

the spread of third-party litigation financing, or TPLF.

You probably haven't heard of TPLF. It's a fairly recent creation, originating in Australia and now landing on the shores of the U.S. In essence, TPLF is the practice of hedge funds and other investment firms providing funds to plaintiffs' lawyers in order to conduct litigation. If the case is won in court or settled, the investor is repaid out of the proceeds of the lawsuit, usually with an extremely high rate of return. The investors, therefore, have a direct stake in the outcome of the case.

Proponents of TPLF say that providing this new funding stream increases access to the courts. But U.S. courts are already widely accessible. For instance, a plaintiff can hire an attorney on a contingency fee basis, a practice that is prohibited in most other developed countries.....we've seen how TPLF benefits funders and hurt litigants. But the biggest loser from TPLF might be society at large. This is because we all rely on an impartial civil justice system to resolve disputes in a fair and expeditious manner. When TPLF debases that system by putting investor profits ahead of justice, society is the loser
hedge_funds  litigation  investors  class_action_lawsuits  lawsuits  third-party 
july 2012 by jerryking
How to Fire People the Right Way
– Meridith Levinson, CIO

October 31, 2011
Rebecca Heyman, a human capital consultant with HR outsourcing company TriNet, notes that filing a discrimination claim with a local EEOC agency as part of a wrongful termination claim costs nothing for an employee, but causes significant disruption to the employer's business. "The employer has to respond to the employee's allegations. They often have to work with an attorney to prepare a response to the claim. That can be costly," she says.

How costly? Mimi Moore, a partner in the labor and employment practice with Bryan Cave LLP, says that each legal claim an employee brings against an employer in court could cost the company between $50,000 and $250,000 in legal fees and potential settlement payouts.

With the economic recovery faltering, companies are once again turning to layoffs to cut costs. In September, employers announced plans to lay off 115,730 workers, which made it the worst month for job cuts in two years, according to global outplacement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas.

Companies that mismanage terminations may see more litigation, says Moore. She notes that in the current climate, when employees are terminated, they're more likely to consider filing a legal claim against their employer because they know how difficult finding a new job will be, and a potential legal settlement could ease their transition.
howto  layoffs  litigation  Octothorpe_Software  firings  EEOC  wrongful_terminations 
november 2011 by jerryking
Litigation Portfolio Outsourcing
To reduce costs, Fortune 500 corporations outsource a wide variety of products and services outside their core competencies (e.g., information technology, employee benefits). The corporate self-insured litigation market is the last, large cost center where outsourcing opportunities have been unavailable. Many large corporations spend more on litigation than on most services and products. Litigation is the only corporate activity where transaction costs exceed all other costs.

DryStone Capital offers corporations the opportunity to outsource litigation. DryStone focuses exclusively on defending large portfolios of litigation, including employment, personal injury, product liability, commercial and environmental. DryStone offers a buy-versus-make alternative.

DryStone Capital resolves all lawsuits for a fixed price, which includes both defense and liability cost, and is 10% less than what it would otherwise cost. Using our own capital, DryStone Capital creates a reserve to take the financial risk away and to guarantee the savings.
law  Outsourcing  litigation  financial_risk  Fortune_500  transaction_costs 
november 2011 by jerryking
Google Bids for Nortel Patent Portfolio - WSJ.com
APRIL 5, 2011 | WSJ | By AMIR EFRATI And STUART WEINBERG.

Google Seeks Nortel Patents in Defensive Move. Google has bid $900 million for the broad patent portfolio held by bankrupt Canadian telecom equipment maker Nortel Networks, in an attempt to shield itself from current and future patent litigation.
patents  Nortel  Google  litigation 
july 2011 by jerryking
Bid for Nortel patents marks Google's new push into mobile world - The Globe and Mail
IAIN MARLOW — Telecom Reporter
From Tuesday's Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Apr. 04, 2011

“Google’s lawyers see much more clearly than I do what patent litigation
they’re open to – they’re the ones who are best in a position to
judge,” he said, noting that this investment could, theoretically,
insure the company against some very expensive litigation.
patents  Nortel  Google  mobile  Iain_Marlow  litigation  pre-emption 
april 2011 by jerryking
How to Beat the Trial Bar - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 7, 2004 | Wall Street Journal | by STEVEN B. HANTLER
litigation  tort_reform  lawyers 
january 2010 by jerryking

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