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jerryking : live_music   7

Why a Music Mogul Is Snapping Up Tiny Trade Magazines
March 19, 2017 | WSJ | By HANNAH KARP.

the music industry is mounting a comeback, one of the most powerful men in the business is snapping up some of its least flashy assets: trade publications.

Music mogul Irving Azoff and a business partner, Tim Leiweke, recently purchased Venues Today, and are in talks to buy Pollstar, people familiar with the matter said. Both outlets cover the live-music business.

Rather than simply trying to pry readers or advertisers from the music industry’s biggest trade magazine, Billboard, the two men are primarily interested in using the magazines to break into the conference business.....The surge of interest in music’s more obscure trades comes as the concert industry continues a long boom and the recorded-music business rebounds after years of declining sales. While magazines and newspapers across the board are generally struggling to compete for advertisers and readers with Facebook Inc. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google, industry trades are closely tied to the health of the businesses they cover, with the firms in those industries being their primary advertisers.

Billboard executives view the entrance of Mr. Azoff and Mr. Leiweke into music media not as a threat but as welcome validation of the music industry’s recovery, according to a person familiar with the matter, who added that Billboard’s revenue has increased 86% since 2013....Mr. Azoff is the former executive chairman of the country’s biggest concert promoter, Live Nation Entertainment Inc.; Mr. Leiweke is the former chief executive of Live Nation’s next-largest competitor, Anschutz Entertainment Group.

Messrs. Azoff and Leiweke could use conferences to help Oak View Group, their venue-management company, which collects annual fees from about two dozen arenas in exchange for sponsorships, event booking and other services.

Controlling the concert trades also allows Mr. Azoff to take on Billboard, a publication he has publicly criticized as it broadened its appeal to woo readers and bigger advertisers from outside the music industry.
music_industry  mergers_&_acquisitions  the_Eagles  M&A  trade_publications  back-house_opportunities  Tim_Leiweke  music  magazines  moguls  concerts  live_music  live_performances 
march 2017 by jerryking
Reviewed: New albums from the summer’s hottest concert headliners - The Globe and Mail
HIP HOP

Hope in Dirt City
Cadence Weapon (Upper Class)
3 stars

If he would just stop being himself, Rollie Pemberton's dazzling rhymes and chameleonic flow would be lighting up the charts. But Cadence Weapon likes skronky saxophone solos, nerdy references (e.g. Louis Theroux on the subtly devastating Cheval) and skewering rappers' follies (Hype Man, where he dramatizes both sides of hip-hop’s favourite master-slave scenario) too much to consider dumbing down. For fans of more than one kind of hip-hop, Cadence’s third album makes for excellent one-stop shopping. Dave Morris

Cadence Weapon plays Lee’s Palace in Toronto June 23, 2012
hip_hop  concerts  live_music  fallacies_follies 
june 2012 by jerryking
Electronic Dance Genre Tempts Investors - NYTimes.com
By BEN SISARIO
Published: April 4, 2012

The concert industry’s new favorite genre is electronic dance music....Having developed on the margins, electronic dance music — high-energy waves of mechanized sound that, at its best, creates a communal experience for a sea of strangers — is dominated by a network of independent promoters.

They include Insomniac, which presents Electric Daisy Carnival; Hard Events, another nationwide promoter; Ultra, whose namesake festival in Miami has expanded to Brazil, Argentina and Poland; and Made Event, behind the Electric Zoo festival in New York.

Their success has attracted a clutch of potential investors from inside and outside the music world. The insiders include Live Nation and A.E.G. Live, the two biggest corporate promoters.

The outsiders include Ron Burkle, the supermarket magnate who made an unsuccessful bid last year for the Warner Music Group, and the media mogul Robert F. X. Sillerman, according to people involved in investment talks who declined to be identified discussing private agreements....a marriage between D.J.’s and billionaire investors may be difficult. Live music is a risky and low-margin business for promoters. Pricing tickets too high or too low, for example, can sink an otherwise successful venture. Dance music also faces the perennial fad question: will its popularity stick this time or blow over as it did in the 1990s, when it was called electronica?
music  music_industry  investors  Live_Nation  EDM  live_music  high-risk  low-margin  music_festivals 
april 2012 by jerryking

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