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jerryking : localization   13

Procter & Gamble vs. Nelson Peltz: A Battle for the Future of Big Brands - WSJ
By Sharon Terlep
Oct. 8, 2017

Activist investor Nelson Peltz, who wants P&G to radically revise its strategy, argues the success of Ms. Francisco’s unit is the exception. He says the Cincinnati giant, hopelessly mired in the past, should shift to smaller, niche brands disconnected from its marquee products, pull in talent from the outside and split into three independent units.

“All the action today is local. It’s these small brands. It’s what the millennials want,” the 75-year-old investor said. “They want a brand with emotion, a brand that’s got a story behind it, a brand that brings value to the environment or is organic.”...P&G stands out as the largest company to face off against an activist investor.....

Many the world’s leading consumer-products companies, which once made the goods that stocked supermarket shelves the world over, have found it hard to adapt to rapidly shifting consumer tastes and the rise of smaller brands. The outcome of the Peltz-P&G battle will help determine the industry’s future direction.....P&G executives have transformed the company into a leaner organization. They say the future lies in the same fundamentals that guided the company for 180 years: huge brands such as Tide and Gillette that spin off products so effective they dominate their category.

“Declaring big brands dead and buried just because there is new media and a new generation is wrong,” said P&G’s lead independent director, Jim McNerney, the former chief executive of Boeing Co. and 3M Co. “Our new world is big brands presented in different ways through different media.”

Mr. McNerney argues that Mr. Peltz, who has had directorships at H.J. Heinz Co. and Oreo maker Mondelez International Inc., is trying to apply a formula that works in food, which is more susceptible to shifting consumer whims, but not for packaged goods such as diapers and dish soap.
P&G  brands  China  localization  shareholder_activism  Nelson_Peltz  shifting_tastes  CPG  emotional_connections 
october 2017 by jerryking
At Luxury Stores, It Isn’t Shopping, It’s an Experience - WSJ
By Christina Binkley
April 16, 2017

What do luxury retailers in urban areas do when they face heavy pressure from the internet? Make their stores an experience. The high-end stores of tomorrow won’t try to compete with online retailers on price or convenience. Instead, they’ll do what many luxe shops are experimenting with now—turning themselves into destinations that customers go to visit instead of simply shop.....Stores will offer human connections, entertaining discoveries and dining options. And instead of being designed to feature one kind of inventory, the stores will function like pop-ups—completely changing what they offer from time to time, or even sweeping products aside to host community events......digital-native shoppers will determine how stores look and function, particularly in cities, where online alternatives with two-hour delivery windows are already plentiful.....

“Selling things isn’t going to be obvious. It’s going to be about selling experiences,” says John Bricker, creative director for Gensler, one of the world’s largest architectural firms with a global retail design practice......In some cases, retailers go so far to create destinations that they don’t even try to sell their signature products. The Gensler-designed Cadillac House in the lobby of the car maker’s New York headquarters is an art gallery and coffeehouse, with luxe white sedans on display by the entrance. People wander in for free Wi-Fi, then get familiar with the car brand by examining the vehicles, says Mr. Bricker. (The cars can’t be purchased there; legally, one must buy from a dealer.)....The strategy of providing a total experience is also spreading to independent retailers that aren’t aiming solely at high-end customers......These shifts are being followed by mass retailers as well. The idea: to move beyond the big-box strategy of the past—where companies built giant stores that people would go out of their way to visit—and build specially tailored stores in urban areas where customers live......Target recently decided to invest $7 billion in renovating its huge suburban stores and building new small-format urban stores, in a strategy to use the large stores as distribution centers for digital orders while creating a network of small city stores that will be located within easy reach of urban dwellers, both for offline shopping and picking up or returning online orders.

Brian Cornell, Target’s chief executive officer, says products will be selected for local populations by store managers who place orders from a catalog—less pet food and more snacks and notebooks for a store near a college campus, for instance.

Target looked at stores like Story in forming the strategy. “We learned a lot about agility,” from Story,
retailers  e-commerce  luxury  customer_experience  millennials  experiential_marketing  localization  merchandising  pop-ups  digital_natives  galleries  coffeehouses  brands  personal_connections  Target  agility  small_spaces  big-box  BOPIS  distribution_centres 
april 2017 by jerryking
U.S. Retailers Learn to Speak Canadian - WSJ
By RITA TRICHUR
Dec. 3, 2014

High-profile stumbles are not lost on those still planning to enter. “We’ve been paying attention to every American retailer that moved into Canada,” said Ms. White of Nordstrom, which expects an approximate loss of $35 million in 2014 due to infrastructure and pre-opening costs.

After first announcing its intentions back in 2012, Nordstrom immediately called some its best Canadian customers. Hosting about 160 of those clients in Calgary, Ottawa, Vancouver and Toronto, the retailer treated them to hors d’oeuvres while seeking their feedback for a Canadian launch. “Bring us the full Nordstrom. Don’t bring us Nordstrom lite,” was the consistent message.
crossborder  luxury  mens'_clothing  retailers  Harry_Rosen  Nordstrom  localization  Saks  loyalty_management  pay_attention 
december 2014 by jerryking
Localization Defined.
Marketing News
Date: September 30, 2011
EBSCO  localization 
march 2012 by jerryking
CMO Council: Marketing Magnified October 2011
very few feel their campaigns are highly evolved on a local level.
localization  TD_Bank  Junior_Achievement 
march 2012 by jerryking
Three Global Game-Changers for the Information Industry
Dec. 2010 | EContent | Ben Sargent. Here are 3 game-changing
opportunities & challenges that product planners & mktg.managers
must engage:
1. Your future entails a hundred languages, give or take. Each year,
more of the world’s popn. goes online & become info. consumers—but
in an increasingly diverse set of languages. In this year’s update, we
detail 57 economically significant languages needed to reach consumers
& businesses in 101 countries. To successfully
move to this level of multilingual publishing, companies must develop a
process for adding groups of new languages, not one language at a
time—for instance, flipping in one product cycle from 30 languages to
60.
2. The web is a visual medium. Product & mktg. managers must
demand video as an integral part of every product or service, from
conception of the product itself all the way to promotion, sales,
support, & community.
3. Falling translation costs will disrupt the information industry.
ProQuest  languages  multilingual  translations  content  ECM  video  web_video  visualization  product_cycles  localization  game_changers  visual_culture  think_threes 
february 2011 by jerryking
Getting a Foothold in China; Smaller Foreign Firms Fight for Piece of the Booming Market
Aug 3, 2004 | Wall Street Journal pg. A.9 | by Ben Dolven.
Small companies have less leverage over suppliers and fewer people to
handle the reams of paperwork China requires....Consider what he says is
the biggest factor in bringing costs down: localization of supply.
Today, Mr. Ball figures he buys about 60% of his materials in China.
Some materials, such as the high-technology textiles that reinforce a
belt, still must come from overseas. "The best way to save cost is to
continue to localize," he says.

This presents all sorts of challenges for a small company, whose smaller
scale of orders give it less leverage over a supplier. "Typically, we
do not attract a supplier," Mr. Ball admits. "Typically we have to go
find our vendor."
ProQuest  China  small_business  market_entry  localization  escalators  manufacturers  supply_chains 
march 2010 by jerryking
Tiny Firms Go Global to Boost Sales - WSJ.com
APRIL 17, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | by RIVA RICHMOND. Small
U.S. businesses are increasingly looking to other countries to boost
their businesses through the import of cheaper or better products. By
tapping international markets directly, small firms can cut the costs of
a middleman and limit their dependence on the U.S. market for supplies.
An expanded product selection also could lead to bigger sales. But
challenges like different customs, language and legal protections,
time-zone differences and even the local weather can make that new
business hard won.
size  entrepreneur  India  African-Americans  personal_care_products  solo  small_business  international_trade  hair  women  globalization  personal_grooming  start_ups  micro  producers  beyondtheU.S.  localization  internationally_minded 
may 2009 by jerryking

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