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jerryking : logic_&_reasoning   23

Opinion | The Wisdom Your Body Knows - The New York Times
By David Brooks
Opinion Columnist

Nov. 28, 2019

**
** “How Emotions Are Made” by Lisa Feldman Barrett.
This has been a golden age for brain research.....we mistakenly believe that thinking happens only from the neck up.......scientists are now focusing on the thinking that happens not in your brain but in your gut. You have neurons spread through your innards, and there’s increasing attention on the vagus nerve, which emerges from the brain stem and wanders across the heart, lungs, kidney and gut. The vagus nerve is one of the pathways through which the body and brain talk to each other in an unconscious conversation. Much of this conversation is about how we are relating to others. Human thinking is not primarily about individual calculation, but about social engagement and cooperation.....When you enter a new situation, Porges argues, your body reacts. Your heart rate may go up. Your blood pressure may change. Signals go up to the brain, which records the “autonomic state” you are in....

a main purpose of the brain is to read the body, and to regulate "the body budget". Spotting a bully on the playground may cause one's brain to predict actions, speeds heart rates and breathing to deal with it. We experience these changes as emotion — e.g. fear, anger, etc. — because our brain has created an emotion concept [JCK - a lexicon??] to make those physical changes meaningful.

“You might think that in everyday life, the things you see and hear influence what you feel, but it’s mostly the other way around: What you feel alters your sight and hearing,”....... Under the old brain-only paradigm, we told people to self-regulate their emotions through conscious self-talk. But real emotional help comes through co-regulation. When a mother and a child physically hold each other, their bodily autonomic states harmonize, connecting on a metabolic level. Together they move from separate distress to mutual calm........the Welch Emotional Connection Screen, which measures the emotional connection between mothers and pre-term babies. ....When we step back and see the brain and body thinking together, the old distinction between reason and emotion doesn’t seem to make sense. Our perception of the world is shaped by the predictions our brains make about our physical autonomic states. It is vital to teach emotional granularity, something our culture pays almost no attention to. We’re not separate brains, coolly observing each other. We’re physical viscera, deeply interacting with each other. The important communication is happening at a much deeper level.
biology  Communicating_&_Connecting  David_Books  digestive_systems  emotional_connections  emotions  gastrointestinal  guts  human_anatomy  human_behavior  human_brains  logic_&_reasoning  mental_health  metabolism  op-ed  physical_touch  physiological_response  psychology  stress_response  thinking  wisdom 
11 weeks ago by jerryking
The concept of probability is not as simple as you think
26 February, 2019 | Aeon Ideas | by Nevin Climenhaga.
is assistant professor at the Institute for Religion and Critical Inquiry at the Australian Catholic University in Melbourne. His work has been published in the Journal of Philosophy and Mind, among others. He lives in Oakleigh, Victori
logic_&_reasoning  mathematics  probabilities 
september 2019 by jerryking
Godwin's Law
Godwin's Law (also known as Godwin's Rule of Nazi Analogies)[1] is a saying made by Mike Godwin in 1990. The law states: "As a discussion on the Internet grows longer, the likelihood of a comparison o...
argumentation  comparisons  disagreements  Godwin's_Law  logic_&_reasoning  Nazis  rhetoric  rules_of_the_game 
september 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | Why Harvard Was Wrong to Make Me Step Down
June 24, 2019 | The New York Times | By Ronald S. Sullivan Jr., Mr. Sullivan is a law professor at Harvard Law School.

In May, Harvard College announced that it would not renew the appointment of me and my wife, Stephanie Robinson, as faculty deans of Winthrop House, one of Harvard’s undergraduate residential houses, because I am one of the lawyers who represented the Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein in advance of his coming sexual assault trial. The administration’s decision followed reports by some students that they felt “unsafe” in an institution led by a lawyer who would take on Mr. Weinstein as a client.

I am willing to believe that some students felt unsafe. But feelings alone should not drive university policy. Administrators must help students distinguish between feelings that have a rational basis and those that do not. In my case, Harvard missed an opportunity to help students do that......I would hope that any student who felt unsafe as a result of my representation of Mr. Weinstein might, after a reasoned discussion of the relevant facts, question whether his or her feelings were warranted. But Harvard was not interested in having that discussion. Nor was Harvard interested in facilitating conversations about the appropriate role of its faculty in addressing sexual violence and the tension between protecting the rights of the criminally accused and treating survivors of sexual violence with respect.

Instead, the administration capitulated to protesters. Given that universities are supposed to be places of considered and civil discourse, where people are forced to wrestle with difficult, controversial and unfamiliar ideas, this is disappointing......reasoned discourse lost out to raw feelings......I am not opposed to student protest. Many important social justice movements began with student protests, including movements from which I, as an African-American, have benefited. Had it not been for students who staged sit-ins at lunch counters, I would not have had the opportunity to be trained at Harvard Law School.

But I am profoundly troubled by the reaction of university administrators who are in charge of student growth and development. The job of a teacher is to help students think through what constitutes a reasonable argument. It is a dereliction of duty for administrators to allow themselves to be bullied into ..Unchecked emotion has replaced thoughtful reasoning on campus. Feelings are no longer subjected to evidence, analysis or empirical defense. Angry demands, rather than rigorous arguments, now appear to guide university policy.
African-Americans  bullying  capitulation  Colleges_&_Universities  critical_thinking  firings  gut_feelings  Harvard  Harvey_Weinstein  HLS  intolerance  logic_&_reasoning  missed_opportunities  op-ed  policymaking  political_correctness  professors  protests  students 
june 2019 by jerryking
How one skilled speech shamed the Trump administration | Financial Times
Sam Leith 4 HOURS AGO

Sam Leith is the author of ‘Words Like Loaded Pistols: Rhetoric from Aristotle to Obama’ (Basic Books
speeches  public_speaking  shame  brevity  logic_&_reasoning  rhetoric  books  politicians 
june 2018 by jerryking
How cosmopolitans can win the argument
9 April/10 April 2016 | Financial Times | Simon Kuper

1. Don't lead with facts. They rarely persuade anyone any more.
2. DOn't use elite spokespeople
3. You win arguments by winning over the middle.
4. Talk mainstream values
5. Don't repeat the other side's story, not even to refute it.
6. Avoid "Them and Us" stories
7. Show, don't tell.
8. Don't call people racists.
9. Don't be boring
Donald_Trump  cosmopolitan  howto  Simon_Kuper  logic_&_reasoning  nationalism  rhetoric  buy-in  emotional_commitment  counterintuitive  skeptics  disagreements  argumentation 
may 2016 by jerryking
The charismatic lord of chaos
November 2015 | FT | Janan Ganesh.

“More time to study”, Mourinho theorises, is what makes undistinguished footballers great managers. ...knew early on that management was his calling....Already multingual and obsessed by the fine margins that decide matches, he left business school after a day to study sports science at the Technical University of Lisbon.From there he chased coaching qualifications and passed through several clubs until a beguiling offer came in 1992. Bobby Robson, Sporting Lisbon's new English manager, needed an interpreter. The job would divert Mourinho from coaching but would acquaint him with a wise elder of the game.... Proximity to megastars taught him his tactical mastery would amount to nothing without the charisma to bend millionaires to his will. He took the education home, where he worked his way to Porto as head coach.....The Mourinho method blends logic with emotion. The coach wins by devising sophisticated game plans, but also by creating an intense working atmosphere that eventually burns itself out.
soccer  coaching  strategic_thinking  questions  logic_&_reasoning  emotions  Janan_Ganesh 
november 2015 by jerryking
Is Algebra Necessary? -
July 28, 2012 | NYTimes.com | By ANDREW HACKER.

Peter Braunfeld of the University of Illinois tells his students, “Our civilization would collapse without mathematics.” He’s absolutely right.

Algebraic algorithms underpin animated movies, investment strategies and airline ticket prices. And we need people to understand how those things work and to advance our frontiers.

Quantitative literacy clearly is useful in weighing all manner of public policies, from the Affordable Care Act, to the costs and benefits of environmental regulation, to the impact of climate change. Being able to detect and identify ideology at work behind the numbers is of obvious use. Ours is fast becoming a statistical age, which raises the bar for informed citizenship. What is needed is not textbook formulas but greater understanding of where various numbers come from, and what they actually convey....mathematics teachers at every level could create exciting courses in what I call “citizen statistics.” This would not be a backdoor version of algebra, as in the Advanced Placement syllabus. Nor would it focus on equations used by scholars when they write for one another. Instead, it would familiarize students with the kinds of numbers that describe and delineate our personal and public lives.

It could, for example, teach students how the Consumer Price Index is computed, what is included and how each item in the index is weighted — and include discussion about which items should be included and what weights they should be given.

This need not involve dumbing down. Researching the reliability of numbers can be as demanding as geometry. More and more colleges are requiring courses in “quantitative reasoning.” In fact, we should be starting that in kindergarten.

I hope that mathematics departments can also create courses in the history and philosophy of their discipline, as well as its applications in early cultures. Why not mathematics in art and music — even poetry — along with its role in assorted sciences? The aim would be to treat mathematics as a liberal art, making it as accessible and welcoming as sculpture or ballet.
mathematics  algorithms  numeracy  infoliteracy  public_policy  CPI  liberal_arts  engaged_citizenry  quantitative  value_judgements  logic_&_reasoning  cross-disciplinary 
july 2012 by jerryking
Giving Great Advice
Janaury 2008 | HBR | Interview of Bruce Wasserstein by Tom Stewart and Gardiner More.

HBR’s editor, Thomas A. Stewart, and senior editor Gardiner Morse
spent many hours at Lazard and interviewed Wasserstein, setting out to understand how he creates value as a manager, as a deal maker, and as a counselor to CEOs. How does he attract and
manage talent, build and sustain knowledge businesses, size up companies and industries, and craft advice?

Wasserstein describes his approach as discovering whether a deal or strategy “makes sense.” Such sensemaking seems to underlie every move he makes, and it has paid off handsomely. Following is an edited presentation of HBR’s conversations with Wasserstein...first to execute deals really well and then to market that track record.

How do you develop individual talent? The idea is to create a hothouse where young talent is nourished by our culture and people are encouraged to think creatively, think deeply,
think about the long-term client relationship—but above all, think. I want them to reflect on what they are doing and why, and then wonder,“Can we do better?”

Talk about the advice business. What are CEOs looking for as you’re helping them understand the landscape? What do they
need that you’ve got? The point of advice is to create value. The
first thing in that effort is not to assume the banker knows more than the client. The second thing is to remind the CEO that corporations have to change in order to prosper and that inaction isn’t prudent—it’s radical. What we can do is help the CEO think through an array of options, partly by asking
the necessary questions, but also by inserting some very practical observations about the effects of specific decisions.
Good advice is at least as qualitative as it is quantitative....On the other hand, there’s the more qualitative part of the advice. This strikes me as being an underdeveloped side of most investment-banking relationships. Knowing the characteristics of the industry and possible consequences of a deal comes from having seen what’s happened in many companies and industries over time. So, for example, you might say, “Look, you need a very different mentality to manage this type of business than your other businesses. You have a process-oriented mentality, but you need a more market-oriented approach. Are you confident that you’re going to be able to keep the number two guy in the company you’re acquiring? Because the number-one guy will probably leave.”

Deals that make sense. Can you elaborate on that? Law school taught me to focus on dissecting premises. Anyone who’s a good logician can build an argument on just about any premises.
The argument may be taut, but the premises may be faulty. When we do deals, I always ask, “Are the premises sound? Is the risk exposure worth it for this particular company, and have
I protected my client’s back?” We proceed by identifying and evaluating qualitatively and quantitatively the key elements of risk in the transaction—overall economy risk, strategic
risk, operating business risk, financing risk, people risk. Similarly, you need to fully understand the upsides. What are the opportunities in cost cuts, synergies, internal development,
additional investments, or revenue enhancement? It’s useful to apply all the paraphernalia of mathematical science in an analysis, but focusing on the sense of things is a much better use of time. Part of determining the sense of a deal involves understanding the macroclimate, the broader context, which I think gets too little attention.

...We think of each deal in terms of a flow chart with a series of black boxes. Each box represents a facet of the deal—for example, valuation, financing structure, approach to the other party, negotiating tactics and deal process, taxes, legal structure, contracts, market reaction, and regulatory hurdles.
advice  argumentation  Bruce_Wasserstein  contracts  cost_of_inaction  dealmakers  deal-making  downside_risks  financial_advisors  financial_risk  howto  investment_banking  J.D.-M.B.A.  Lazard  logic_&_reasoning  M&A  market_risk  mergers_&_acquisitions  operating_risk  problem_solving  product_risk  risk-assessment  synergies  team_risk  upside 
july 2012 by jerryking
Free-Market Socialism
I'm old-fashioned enough to believe the best reasons for attending college are learning how (not what) to think---how to amass and weigh evidence, how to hone and evaluate arguments, and how to refine the humanistic and social values that will fit one's employment into a complete life.
letters_to_the_editor  David_Brooks  critical_thinking  Colleges_&_Universities  argumentation  logic_&_reasoning  criteria 
january 2012 by jerryking
Teaching High School Students Applied Logical Reasoning
2009 | Journal of Information Technology Education Volume 8,
Innovations in Practice | Dan Bouhnik and Yahel Giat

The rapid changes in information technology in recent years have rendered current high school
curricula unable to cope with student needs. In consequence, students do not possess the proper
skills required in today’s information era. Specifically, many students lack the skills to search
efficiently for information. Moreover, even when abundant information is available to them, students
are unable to critically read, analyze, and evaluate it.
To address these problems we developed a high school course designed to provide students with
applied logical tools. The course was developed for two different student groups: social sciencesoriented
students and exact sciences-oriented students. It is composed of several parts whose contents
depend on the students’ orientation. This course is part of a broader program whose purpose
is a comprehensive study and understanding of logical and concept-based systems....Thus, instead of utilizing this abundant information to produce better informed students, we often find that students are unable to distinguish true from false, separate fact from fiction, identify the underlying motives, and reach sound and reasoned opinions
agreeably_disagree  argumentation  commoditization_of_information  critical_thinking  decision_making  disagreements  education  high_schools  information_overload  Junior_Achievement  life_skills  logic_&_reasoning  rapid_change  rhetoric  students 
november 2011 by jerryking
Book review: Crisis on Campus - WSJ.com
AUGUST 31, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by NAOMI SCHAEFER
RILEY. Reading, Writing, Radical Change. Abolish tenure, require more
teaching, put star professors online. ...`` When Mark Taylor's children
were growing up, he made them write a three-page paper once a week each
summer between sixth grade and college. "It could be on any subject they
chose, and the only requirement was that the essay had to be
discursive, that is to say, they had to formulate a thesis, develop an
argument, defend it, and draw a conclusion," ...At heart, Mr. Taylor has
an old-fashioned sense of what it takes for students to become good
writers and good thinkers: for starters, a lot of practice at writing
and thinking. ``
Colleges_&_Universities  reform  distance_education  tenure  critical_thinking  NaomiSchaeferRiley  book_reviews  parenting  logic_&_reasoning 
august 2010 by jerryking
Cool it. Slow down. Don't buy the rhetoric
November 21, 2009 | globeandmail.com | by AVNER MANDELMAN.
The formal art of convincing others is called rhetoric. The Greek and
Romans used to teach it, as did the Jesuits, British law schools of old
and certain colleges in France. There is a variety of rhetorical styles -
Roman, Greek (which includes oratory), British, French, German - but
all are meant to do one thing: convince you and push you into action.
That topic of this column - a warning against letting yourself be
convinced without checking things yourself--due diligence.
Slow_Movement  rhetoric  logic_&_reasoning  Avner_Mandelman  investment_advice  due_diligence  persuasion  Greek  Romans  self-delusions 
november 2009 by jerryking
40 ideas we need now -- Unlearning the tyranny of facts
Nov. 2006 | This Magazine | DAVID NAYLOR. Engage in critical
thinking. Pinpoint flaws in logic, dissect rhetorical flourishes away
from the core of an argument, examine issues from different perspectives
and differentiate science from pseudo-science...We are still very
focused on facts—arrayed in patterns, conveyed passively, or uncovered
more or less predictably through cookbook experimentation and
unchallenging exploration. That emphasis seems incongruous. With
computers able to store and search vast amounts of information, facts
are cheap [JCK:the Web is really a source of "external knowledge"]...What might the next generation of learners do instead of
memorizing facts, you ask? Among other things, they could read and play
music. Play more sports. Write prose and poetry. Acquire a skeptic’s
toolkit of sound reasoning skills. Debate highly-charged issues and
learn the lost art of rational and respectful discourse. Study
inspirational biographies, not to memorize facts, but to promote
understanding of how one might lead a more meaningful life.

[From my own note: the presence of facts does not mean that the truth is present. The "truth" is a more complicated thing than mere facts alone]
agreeably_disagree  argumentation  biographies  commoditization_of_information  critical_thinking  David_Naylor  disagreements  external_knowledge  facts  ideas  infoliteracy  inspiration  logic_&_reasoning  poetry  public_discourse  rhetoric  skepticism  sports  uToronto 
may 2009 by jerryking

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