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jerryking : logistics   58

How FleetOptic’s data analytics smooth the last mile of a parcel’s journey
SEPTEMBER 27, 2019 | The Globe and Mail| by JOANNA PACHNER, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL.

FleetOptics specializes in so-called last-mile delivery, from a retailer's distribution centre to the customer's door—the hardest and most expensive portion, estimated to account for a least 30% of total transportation cost. It's also the most vital as, in the e-commerce era, receiving the package is often the only contact consumers have with a human during the transaction. FleetOptics' software makes the parcel's progress transparent for both business and consumer. Customers can track the driver on-screen as they might an approaching Uber car, avoiding that infuriating experience of the deliveryman arriving just after they jump in the shower. Retailers, meanwhile, can check packages' status in real time through FleetOptics' online portal. As co-founder Vince Buckley pithily sums it up, “Tesla is a battery company that also makes cars. We're a technology company that also makes deliveries.”
analytics  data  data_driven  delivery  delivery_networks  delivery_services  distribution  distribution_centres  e-commerce  FleetOptics  fulfillment  last_mile  logistics  package_delivery  retailers  same-day  start_ups  shipping  third-party  traceability  tracking  trucking  warehouses 
november 2019 by jerryking
Now bigger than eBay, Shopify sets its sights on Amazon
August 20, 2019 | Financial Times | by Tim Bradshaw, Global Technology Correspondent.

.....ecommerce via social media platforms such as Instagram and Pinterest, which have become vital to growing online retail outside Amazon, and increasingly important to Shopify.

“Instagram has been the most phenomenal growth vector for small businesses,” said Mr Lütke. “It's a great way to tell stories about products that Amazon, with its static pictures and very sanitised listings, doesn't offer people.” 
Amazon  e-commerce  fulfillment  logistics  retailers  Shopify  Tobias_Lütke 
august 2019 by jerryking
On-Demand Warehouse Space Gains Traction in Tight Real-Estate Market - WSJ
By Jennifer Smith
Dec. 23, 2018

QUOTABLE
You don’t always want to build the church for Easter. —Justin Schuhardt, senior director of operations for Walmart e-commerce, on on-demand warehousing.
Flexe  logistics  on-demand  retailers  Second_Closet  Wal-Mart  warehouses  nimbleness  cold_storage 
december 2018 by jerryking
Cold calling - The Forecast 2018 - Magazine | Monocle
We seldom stop to think about how our food gets from its source to our plates but, when we do, we realise the mammoth effort involved. Luckily technology is revolutionising the industry and temperature-controlled cargo is going places like never before.
cold_storage  logistics  magazines 
november 2018 by jerryking
Inside FreshDirect’s Big Bet to Win the Home-Delivery Fight - WSJ
By Jennifer Smith
July 18, 2018 5:30 a.m

Designed to keep food fresh longer and move it faster, FreshDirect’s 400,000 square-foot distribution centre is the online grocer’s multimillion-dollar bet on the fastest-growing sector in the grocery business, home-delivery. FreshDirect pioneered the e-commerce home-delivery market, and now with Amazon and big grocery chains like Kroger Co. piling on investments, companies are jockeying for position in a business that some believe is the future of supermarket sales.....FreshDirect's trucks now provide next-day delivery to customers across the New York-New Jersey, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., metropolitan areas, with plans to expand into Boston next. The private company says it generated between $600 million and $700 million in annual revenue in 2017.

It declined to disclose the cost of the new facility, which was financed with the help of a $189 million investment round in 2016 led by J.P. Morgan Asset Management, direct funding and incentives from state and local governments......Amazon, Target Corp. and other large companies have invested hundreds of millions of dollars to expand food delivery and build out their grocery e-commerce operations. Supermarket chain owner Koninklijke Ahold Delhaize NV’s Peapod unit, the longest-running online grocery service in the U.S., has expanded to 24 markets and is investing in technology to cut its handling and delivery costs.

Walmart Inc. said this month that Jet.com, the online retailer it bought two years ago, will open a fulfillment center in the Bronx this fall to help roll out same- and next-day grocery deliveries in New York City.

The grocers are trying to solve one of the toughest problems in home delivery: Getting food to doorsteps in the same condition consumers would expect if they went to the store themselves. Delivering perishables is trickier than dropping off paper towels or dogfood. Fruit bruises, meat spoils, eggs break. ........FreshDirect’s logistic hurdles start well before delivery. It must get products from its suppliers to the building, process the food, then pick, pack and ship orders before the quality degrades.

That is why the new distribution centre has 15 different temperature zones. Tomatoes do best at about 55 degrees, but “chicken and meat like it to be just at 32 degrees... it gives more of shelf life to it,"....Software determines the most efficient route for each order, and tells workers which items to pick.....A big part of the facility [distribution centre] is ripping out tons and tons of operating costs out of the business.....The stakes in getting the technology right are high. FreshDirect is competing with grocery chains that often fill online orders through their stores, using a mix of staff and third-party services like Instacart Inc. So-called click-and-collect services, where consumers swing by to pick up their own orders, tend to have better margins because the retailer isn’t paying for last-mile delivery.....Online-only operations with centralized warehouses tend to be more efficient than logistics run out of stores, because they use fewer workers and can position goods for faster fulfillment.
algorithms  Amazon  big_bets  cold_storage  distribution_centres  distribution  e-commerce  food  FreshDirect  grocery  home-delivery  infrastructure  Kroger  logistics  perishables  retailers  software  supermarkets  Target  Wal-Mart  warehouses  fulfillment  same-day  piling_on  last_mile 
july 2018 by jerryking
Amazon encourages entrepreneurs to build logistics network | Financial Times
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Amazon  Amazon_Prime  last_mile  Fedex  UPS  USPS  entrepreneur  logistics  shippers  speed  small_business  e-commerce  delivery  delivery_networks  delivery_times  delivery_services 
june 2018 by jerryking
Walmart Expands Online Grocery Delivery to 100 Cities - The New York Times
By TIFFANY HSU and NICK WINGFIELD MARCH 14, 2018

“There is a lot of experimenting going on as everyone tries to figure out that last-mile delivery — it’s a tough economic equation to make work,” said Mike Knemeyer, a professor of logistics at Ohio State University. “But if you can, you’ll have a big head start on the others, and you’ll end up making money not just in groceries but on all of the things that you sell.”

The nexus of e-commerce and grocery sales is increasingly appealing to retailers.
Wal-Mart  home-delivery  e-commerce  grocery  supermarkets  Amazon  Whole_Foods  distribution_channels  logistics  same-day  delivery_networks  last_mile 
march 2018 by jerryking
Amazon forecasts quarterly loss as spending spree shows no signs of abating
JULY 28, 2017 | Financial Times | Leslie Hook.

The Seattle-based tech company is now expanding on all fronts: buying the Whole Foods grocery chain, offering new delivery services around the world and racing to open enough data centres to keep up with demand for its cloud computing business.....

Capital expenditure grew twice as quickly as revenue during the period, spending on servers for cloud computing rose 70 per cent and employee headcount jumped 42 per cent.

The figures suggest Amazon is moving towards a more capital-intensive business model with permanently higher headcount and a much bigger physical footprint. This represents a shift from the more streamlined online sales model that relies on big, efficient warehouses to keep costs as low as possible....Amazon’s hiring jump in the second quarter points to a different but equally important shift: Mr Olsavsky said adding sales staff for the company’s advertising and cloud computing divisions were the key reasons behind the rise in headcount, which increased from 351,000 at the beginning of the quarter to 382,400 at the end.

Amazon has been opening a growing number of bricks-and-mortar stores, including a convenience store and two grocery pick-up points, and its purchase of Whole Foods will add hundreds of US stores virtually overnight.....One of the fastest areas of growth was in third-party logistics, as it provides handling services for an increasing array of merchants who sell goods through Amazon. Revenue from these third-party logistics services rose 38 per cent during the quarter to hit $7bn, representing more than a sixth of Amazon’s sales....The growth in that division, as well as intense competition from rivals Microsoft and Google, has pushed Amazon to spend more than $8bn on servers over the past 12 months.

These two divisions — logistics and Amazon Web Services — are two of the fastest-growing in the company but both will require heavy investment to keep on trend.
Amazon  logistics  capital-intensity  Whole_Foods  hiring  capex  AWS  delivery_services 
august 2017 by jerryking
Self-Storage Startups Offer Pickup and Delivery - WSJ
By Peter Grant
June 20, 2017

A handful of startups such as Clutter Inc. and MakeSpace Labs Inc. are using the latest in logistics and web technology to offer what they claim is a more efficient and user-friendly way for people to store furniture, keepsakes, sports equipment and other stuff that has been clogging up their basements and attics.

They work differently from the 40,000 or so traditional self-storage facilities that basically offer garages or sheds for customers to fill up as they please. The new competitors pick up and deliver items instead of forcing customers to schlep items to their facilities like the incumbent firms do. The upstarts also photograph what they store, and customers can view their items online and ask for some or all of them back with a click.....Executives at the big self-storage companies, like Public Storage , CubeSmart and Extra Space Storage Inc., say they aren’t worried. They say the startups’ costs of transportation and handling will be so high they won’t be able to price their service competitively.......Ms. Durkay predicted that the big companies will respond if the startups become more competitive. “To the extent that we have a…revolution in the way people are using storage facilities, the management teams may be able to pivot and modify their strategies.”

Mr. Rosen, of MakeSpace, said he isn’t surprised Public Storage failed at what he and others are trying to do. “They’re a real-estate business,” he said. “What do they know about logistics?”......Executives at the startups say they can keep prices low partly by locating facilities in cheaper spaces far away from customers. Traditional facilities generally are just a few miles away from customers’ homes, and this can drive up costs in high-price real-estate markets like New York and San Francisco.

Moving and handling items clearly drives up prices......“It would become cloud storage for your things,” said Brendan Wallace, co-founder of Fifth Wall.
storage  self-storage  logistics  messiness  hoarding  decluttering  urban  upstarts  Second_Closet  subscriptions  physical_assets  artifacts  home-delivery 
june 2017 by jerryking
How Glencore AG became a giant in the global agriculture trade - The Globe and Mail
ERIC REGULY
ROTTERDAM, NETHERLANDS
THE GLOBE AND MAIL
LAST UPDATED: WEDNESDAY, MAY 03, 2017

Interested in acquisitions, Glencore AG has accumulated an extensive network of grain assets around the world, and has no plans of stopping
Eric_Reguly  Glencore  soybeans  CPPIB  Argentina  ADM  Bunge  Cargill  Louis_Dreyfus  oilseeds  Viterra  agriculture  growth  opportunities  Rotterdam  grains  logistics  storage  transportation  trading  agribusiness  supply_chains  Marc_Rich 
may 2017 by jerryking
FedEx Says Retailers Should Be Paying More for Web Delivery - WSJ
By LAURA STEVENS
Updated March 16, 2016

FedEx Corp. executives said retailers should be paying more for shipments to help offset the cost of expanding its network to meet the growing demands of e-commerce.....FedEx CFO Alan Graf said that it is important for the price of shipping an e-commerce package to reflect the effort it takes to deliver it. “We can’t build these networks and spend this kind of capital and not get a return on it,” Mr. Graf said in an interview....Mr. Smith said he thought it was unbelievable that some have suggested that Amazon would be able to build out a network to compete with FedEx and rival United Parcel Service Inc.

Just because Amazon has created a network of warehouses to support its retail operations, doesn’t mean that could translate to something akin to FedEx’s massive network for deliveries, Mr. Smith said. “The key driver of any delivery system is route density and revenue per delivery stop,” he said....One way that FedEx intends to boost its e-commerce returns is by increasing fees attached to the growing number of large shipments such as kayaks and other items that don’t fit into its ground network.

Mr. Smith blamed some of the trend in low-cost e-commerce expectations on the U.S. Postal Service, which it and other delivery companies, including UPS and Amazon, use to deliver packages the most expensive leg of the trip—to resident’s doors....
Fedex  e-commerce  retailers  shippers  package_delivery  couriers  return_on_effort  Amazon  UPS  USPS  last_mile  logistics  distribution_channels  delivery_networks  route_density 
march 2016 by jerryking
Same-Day Service for Online Shoppers: More Home Delivery, In-Store Pickup - WSJ
By ELIZABETH HOLMES
Updated Dec. 9, 2014

Retailers are poised with two get-it-now solutions. Shoppers can buy online and pick up in stores, the more widely available same-day option. Or, they can get same-day home delivery, the Holy Grail of e-commerce.

Once the domain of restaurants and florists, same-day delivery has expanded to tech giants like Google, and Amazon is experimenting with bike messengers and drones. Meanwhile, stores like Macy’s , Bloomingdale’s, and Neiman Marcus are getting in on the game, offering some online shoppers that same-day gratification, either at no charge or for a nominal fee....The more commonly offered option to buy online and pick up in store—known in the industry as “BOPIS”—is an important step for retailers toward “omnichannel” operations, or integrated online and in-store inventory.

Gap Inc., operator of Gap, Banana Republic and Old Navy stores and websites, began inviting Web and mobile shoppers last year to “reserve in store.” The shopper reserves an item and a specific pick-up location using one of the brand websites or apps. An employee picks the item from the selling floor and scans it to confirm the size and style. Shoppers receive an email or text when the order is ready....To make same-day delivery cost effective, Deliv looks to aggregate pickups and deliveries, says Daphne Carmeli, Deliv’s founder and chief executive. Sending one driver to pick up one package and deliver it in one hour would cost between $20 and $22. When the driver picks up and delivers two packages, those costs are halved. “It doesn’t take much pooling to get down to this disruptive price,” Ms. Carmeli says.
retailers  logistics  e-commerce  speed  delivery  home-delivery  Deliv  same-day  omnichannel  Macy’s  Bloomingdale’s  Neiman_Marcus  web  rooming  BOPIS  in-store 
december 2014 by jerryking
Look to Hong Kong data for a glimpse into global retail troubles - The Globe and Mail
CARL MORTISHED
Look to Hong Kong data for a glimpse into global retail troubles Add to ...
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Aug. 21 2014,

The feng shui from Hong Kong is distinctly bearish. Li & Fung Ltd. is a logistics and supply management firm, in simple terms a middle-man that bridges the gap between big fashion and apparel retailers, such as Target Corp., Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and Marks & Spencer Group PLC and their largely Asian suppliers. Owning no sewing machines and employing no seamstresses, it nonetheless is at the cutting edge of global retailing, making $8.7-billion (U.S.) in revenues over six months. It is no more nor less than the back office for some very big brands, organizing the supply of raw materials, the manufacturing, the distribution and warehousing of the frocks you see in the shops.
Carl_Mortished  Hong_Kong  Li_&_Fung  fashion  Marks_&_Spencer  asset-light  logistics  supply_chains  data  apparel  Target  Wal-Mart  retailers  middlemen 
august 2014 by jerryking
Amazon, in Threat to UPS, Tries Its Own Deliveries - WSJ.com
By GREG BENSINGER And LAURA STEVENS CONNECT
Updated April 24, 2014
Amazon  logistics  UPS  supply_chains  fulfillment 
april 2014 by jerryking
Regional Shippers Pose New Threat to UPS, FedEx - WSJ.com
Dec. 18, 2013 | WSJ | By Laura Stevens.

Many of these companies started as local couriers or express package delivery companies 20 or 30 years ago—some catering in transporting checks for clearing, movie reels or other largely obsolete business areas. But the companies experienced rapid growth after DHL, considered the low-cost alternative to UPS and FedEx, retrenched in the U.S. market about five years ago. The surge in e-commerce and subsequent increase in small package deliveries also helped.

Because they operate in smaller market areas, the regionals can offer later pickup times for next-day delivery to more areas, compared with national carriers who often have to drive, then fly the packages through complicated hub networks.
shippers  e-commerce  UPS  FedEx  speed  logistics  regional  couriers  package_delivery 
december 2013 by jerryking
The Race for Faster Delivery of Everything - Corporate Intelligence - WSJ
December 11, 2013, 7:34 PM

The Race for Faster Delivery of Everything

Article
Comments (2)

Corporate Intelligence HOME PAGE »

By
Tom Gara
delivery  time-based  Amazon  AmazonFresh  supply_chains  UPS  EBay  EBay_Now  shippers  perishables  logistics  delivery_times  speed  fulfillment  same-day  delivery_services  fast-paced 
december 2013 by jerryking
Book Review: General Albert C. Wedemeyer - WSJ.com
September 9, 2012 | WSJ | By JONATHAN W. JORDAN.
The Man With a Plan
A warrior who helped lead the Allies to victory armed with charts, graphs and a meticulous attention to detail.

Albert Coady Wedemeyer (1897-1989) was from an upper-middle-class family in Omaha, Neb. Fascinated by European history and the grand strategy of empires as a youth, he was inexorably drawn to the life of a soldier and graduated from West Point in 1919. He foresaw another war with Germany and, in the late 1930s, attended the German army's prestigious general-staff school, the Kriegsakademie. There he learned the art of blitzkrieg alongside his future enemies. He watched Nazi brownshirts strut around Berlin, venting their hatred against Jews. He was in Vienna during the Anschluss, and he saw the Czechoslovakian crisis unfold from the German perspective.

Wedemeyer's report summarizing German tactics and organization brought him to the attention of George C. Marshall, who in 1939 became the Army's chief of staff. Marshall assigned Wedemeyer to the War Plans Division and tasked him with reducing America's mobilization requirements to a single document. In the summer of 1941, in response to a request from Roosevelt, Wedemeyer's team expanded this into a blueprint on how to defeat America's likely enemies in a future war.
1919  book_reviews  WWII  U.S._Army  logistics  generalship  warfare  war  blitzkrieg  military_academies  George_Marshall  mobilization  grand_strategy  '30s  blueprints  detail_oriented  West_Point 
september 2012 by jerryking
Get Leverage From Logistics
May-June 1984 | HBR | Ron D. Shapiro
logistics  HBR 
june 2012 by jerryking
The rediscovery of logistics
September-October 1984 | Harvard Business Review | Graham Sharman
logistics  HBR 
june 2012 by jerryking
Tailored Logistics: The Next Advantage
May-June 1993 | HBR | Joseph B. Fuller, James O'Conor, and Richard Eawlinson.
logistics  HBR 
june 2012 by jerryking
The Reverse Supply Chain
February 2002 | HBR | V. Daniel R. Guide Jr. and Luk N. Van Wassenhove
product_returns  supply_chains  reverse_logistics  logistics  manufacturers 
june 2012 by jerryking
Many Happy (Product) Returns
July 2002 | HBR | James Stock, Thomas Speh, and Hebert Shear
product_returns  HBR  logistics  reverse_logistics 
june 2012 by jerryking
Special Delivery
September 2004 | Robb Report Worth | by Lynn Fritz, founder of Fritz Institute.

How does the aid get to where it is needed? Does it arrive complete? Where does the money come form?
logistics  disasters  relief_recovery_reconstruction  Africa  high_net_worth  philanthropy 
june 2012 by jerryking
Aerotropolis: The Airport-Based Global City of Tomorrow - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 26, 2011 | wsj | By GREG LINDSAY. From Dubai to
Chongqing to Honduras, the Silk Road of the future is taking shape in
urban developments based on airport hubs. Welcome to the world of the
'aerotropolis.' an amalgam of made-to-order office parks, convention
hotels, cargo complexes and even factories, which in some cases line the
runways. It is a pure node in a global network whose fast-moving
packets are people and goods instead of data. And it is the future of
the global city. ...The basic aim of an aerotropolis is to disrupt local
incumbents and monopolies using the long arm of air travel. It allows
Indian hospitals to entice American heart patients for top-notch surgery
at rock-bottom prices. It lets factories move out to the far reaches of
western China to manufacture the iPad for lower wages while absorbing
millions of urban migrants. Detroit's leaders are even building an
aerotropolis in a Hail Mary bid for Chinese investment.
airports  economic_development  design  industrial_policies  Dubai  globalization  logistics  Paul_Romer 
february 2011 by jerryking
Wal-Mart Asks Suppliers to Cede Control of Deliveries
May 21, 2010 | Businessweek | By Chris Burritt, Carol Wolf and Matthew Boyle
Wal-Mart  logistics  transportation  supply_chains 
august 2010 by jerryking
Kraft Foods Works on Improving Its Recipe for Logistics in China - WSJ.com
AUGUST 2, 2004 | Wall Street Journal | By CUI RONG, Staff
Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Kraft Foods Works on Improving Its
Recipe for Logistics in China
Kraft  China  logistics  pilfering  due_diligence 
march 2010 by jerryking
Innovate, Yes--But Where?
03.13.06 | Forbes | by Rich Karlgaard. "Today’s bestseller
list on management bursts with innovation-themed titles. Two I’ve read
and recommend are Geoffrey Moore’s Dealing With Darwin: How Great
Companies Innovate at Every Phase of Their Evolution and Vijay
Govindarajan and Chris Trimble’s 10 Rules for Strategic Innovators: From
Idea to Execution." Startups, I think, hold the best cards when it
comes to two types of innovation: technology and price. But incumbents
also have ample areas in which they can innovate. Consider these
examples: Cost Innovation, Logistics Innovation, Design Innovation,
Line-Extension Innovation, Data-Analysis Innovation,
innovation  howto  Rich_Karlgaard  Geoffrey_Moore  data_mining  design  branding  logistics  Vijay_Govindarajan  books  start_ups  costs  taxonomy 
october 2009 by jerryking
Tracking deliveries of all kinds is on everyone's radar -
7/31/2009 | USATODAY.com | by Bruce Horovitz. " "Data is
money," says Patricia Martin, author of Renaissance Generation: The Rise
of the Cultural Consumer and What It Means to Your Business. "The more
information you have, the more interesting you are.""
traceability  tracking  Fedex  UPS  location  data  data_driven  analytics  logistics  couriers  package_delivery 
september 2009 by jerryking
Consumed - Work Study - How to Create a Million-Dollar Business Before Graduating From College - NYTimes.com
April 10, 2009 | New York Times | By ROB WALKER. Profiles, a
23-year-old Dominic Coryell, a senior at Northeastern University, who
runs Boston-based Garment Valet. in 2008, Garment Valet booked $950,000
in revenue with 14 full-time employees.
entrepreneur  logistics  operations  value_propositions  Colleges_&_Universities  college_moguls 
april 2009 by jerryking
Weak Links in the Food (Supply) Chain - WSJ.com
JUNE 24, 2008 WSJ article by BEN WORTHEN. Talks about makers
of software systems that oversee centralized inventory, warehousing and transportation planning.
food  software  Papa_John's  Nestlé  supply_chains  Ben_Worthen  logistics  weak_links 
february 2009 by jerryking
A Memphis Presence Gives Small Firms Logistical Advantage
July 10, 2007 article by Raymund Flandez on how small companies
are setting up a presence in Memphis, Tenn. to be closer to Fedex's
overnight cargo facility.
Fedex  small_business  location_based_services  Raymund_Flandez  package_delivery  location  filetype:pdf  media:document  logistics 
january 2009 by jerryking

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