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jerryking : low-key   8

7 Closing Strategies to Double Your Average Sale Size
August 11 | Entrepreneur Magazine | Marc Wayshak - GUEST WRITER
Your success depends on closing bigger, better deals. Put your time and energy into prospects with the power to make large investments and introduce you to others who can do the same.

1. Get over your fear.
Many salespeople are simply too scared to sell to huge companies...... large companies face the same problems as your small customers do, just on a bigger scale. This means they need a bigger version of your solution -- and they have the budget to match. Get over your fear.

2. Stand apart from the crowd.
High-level prospects hear from an average of 10 salespeople every day. If you do what everyone else is doing, you’ll never get through to them or earn their trust. To double your average sales size, you must be intentional about standing apart from the crowd in your industry. While others pitch, you should ask questions. While others are enthusiastic, you should be low-key and genuine. While your competitors focus on their products, you should focus on your prospect’s deepest frustrations and show how you can solve them.

3. Stop selling to low-level prospects.
Selling low-level prospects harms your close rate and decreasing your average sale size. Low-level prospects simply don’t have the power or budget to tell you “yes." They’re not the decision-makers. If you want to increase the size of your sales, stop selling to prospects who lack the budget to invest in your solution.

4. Sell to decision-makers.
It’s a best practice to head straight to the top of the food chain and sell to directors, vice presidents, and C-level executives. They have the power and budget to say “yes” to your offer. If someone refers you back down the chain, you’re still landing an introduction to the right person -- by his or her boss, no less.

5. Stop cold-calling.
Cold calls are miserable. Try implementing a sales-prospecting campaign. Plan your calls, letters and emails as follow-ups to a valuable letter or package you send via FedEx. This could be a special report, unique sample or company analysis. These intentional, repeated touches over a series of months will set you up as a familiar name by the time you actually get your prospect on the phone. When a huge sale is on the line, you can afford to invest time and money to catch a single prospect’s attention.

6. Know the decision-making process.
If you’ve closed only small deals at small companies in the past, you might be accustomed to working with just one or two decision-makers at a time. In large corporations, the decision-making process can be much more complicated. One of the biggest mistakes salespeople make is failing to understand the decision-making process. Get a grasp of this early on, and you can stay in front of the right people, build value for them and close your sales at higher prices.

7. Leverage sales for introductions.
When you close one large sale at a big organization, don’t stop there. Ask new customers for introductions to others in their company or network who could benefit from your offering. You have nothing to lose by asking for introductions, but failure to do so will cost you massive opportunity and revenue.
Gulliver_strategies  sales  fear  large_companies  differentiation  sales_cycle  buyer_choice_rejection  cold_calling  referrals  prospects  JCK  executive_management  campaigns  Aimia  LBMA  strategic_thinking  close_rate  questions  thinking_big  enterprise_clients  C-suite  low-key  authenticity  doubling  the_right_people 
august 2017 by jerryking
Cable guy out front in mayoral race
February 11, 2003 | G&M Page A18 | By JOHN BARBER.

John Tory shocked the municipal press gallery to the tips of its shabby boots last week when he marched us all to the Sai Woo restaurant -- legendary lair of backroom dealmakers, circa 1965 -- to announce his intention of running for mayor of Toronto in 2003.
He did it in the simplest way: by talking in sentences. But it was still a shock. An entire generation has passed since any of us has encountered a right-wing mayoralty candidate -- to say nothing of a mayor -- capable of doing that....But Mr. Tory's emphasis on the many-faceted "decline of Toronto," visible in everything from the quality of decision-making at City Hall to the number of tourists spending their money here, shows that he knows how to make the most of his breaks, His deliberately low-key kickoff betrayed evidence of extensive research -- i.e., polling -- and a well-organized, professional campaign team. These guys clearly know what they're doing.
Politically, they have plopped their candidate straight into the middle of the spectrum, right on top of Barbara Hall, the former Toronto mayor who is leading early polls in the 2003 race. She has travelled there from the left, he from the right; at this point in the race, the difference between them is much more one of style than policy.
John_Tory  mayoral  elections  Toronto  low-key  Queen’s_Park 
september 2012 by jerryking
Parks too important to be left just to city hall
03 Dec 2011| The Globe and Mail pg. A.19. | Marcus Gee. The article says the city should also encourage charitable foundations and private companies to sponsor public parks, especially in low-income neighbourhoods with lots of new immigrants. The Toronto Public Library Foundation, he notes, has raised more than $50-million for libraries. Why not revitalize the low-key Toronto Parks and Trees Foundation and make it a heavy-hitting fundraiser for parks?
parks  Toronto  Marcus_Gee  philanthropy  charities  ProQuest  low-key  city_hall 
january 2012 by jerryking
Low-key choice for high-profile Tata Group - The Globe and Mail
James Lamont
New Delhi— Financial Times
Posted on Wednesday, November 23, 2011
Tata  appointments  conglomerates  low-key 
november 2011 by jerryking
Low-key founder of LinkedIn hits IPO jackpot - The Globe and Mail
omar el akkad AND paul waldie
From Friday's Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, May. 19, 2011
Omar_El_Akkad  Paul_Waldie  Reid_Hoffman  profile  LinkedIn  low-key 
september 2011 by jerryking
Why conversation is as important to a marriage as sex ProQuest
Nov 26, 2005. Globe & Mail. Judith Timson. Family
therapists have a keen sense of how pivotal everyday low-key
conversation is to a good marriage, they can sense when a husband and
wife still respect and listen to what the other says..."sex is very
important, but that mutual respect for your mate and what they think is
the most important. You don't have to agree on things -- as a matter of
fact, I think good conversation often comes from the disagreement,"
family therapist Diane Moody says...Psychiatrist Cathi Borsook, says
conversation "is perhaps the major way couples find closeness with each
other." If conversation doesn't happen, even on a banal and casual
basis, there's little intimacy on any level...adds therapist Diane
Moody, " good conversation is an adventure and you have to plan it a
little by reading and thinking. In that way, I can see that it can be
compared to sex -- it takes good communication, a wish to please, some
planning and some creativity to keep it alive."
ProQuest  Judith_Timson  conversations  Communicating_&_Connecting  respect  listening  marriage  relationships  intimacy  disagreements  low-key 
june 2011 by jerryking

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