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Captaincy - Peggy Noonan's Blog - WSJ
Aug 4, 2014 |WSJ| Peggy Noonan

There are [underlying] reasons for [the existence of the weirdest] traditions and arrangements [--but you have to ask questions to uncover them]. Sometimes they are good and sometimes not, but they are reasons, explanations grounded in some sort of experience. I had a conversation about this a few years ago with a young senior at Harvard who on graduation would go to work for a great consulting firm that studies the internal systems of business clients to see if they can be bettered. He asked if I had any advice, which I did not. Then I popped out, with an amount of feeling that surprised me because I didn’t know I had been thinking about it, that he should probably approach clients with the knowledge that systems and ways of operating almost always exist for a reason. Maybe the reason is antiquated or not applicable to current circumstances, but there are reasons for structures, and if you can tease them out they will help you better construct variations or new approaches. I can’t remember why but this opened up a nice conversation about how consultants walk into new jobs with a bias toward change—the recommendation of change proves their worth and justifies their fees—but one should be aware of that bias and replace it with a bias for improvement, which is different.
Peggy_Noonan  traditions  advice  biases  bias_for_improvement  bias_toward_change  institutional_knowledge  internal_systems  Jason_Isaacs  management_consulting  institutional_memory 
april 2019 by jerryking
Meet the New Advertising Agency: Consulting Firms - WSJ
By Lara O’Reilly
June 18, 2018

Competition in the advertising industry used to mean little more than Madison Avenue agencies vying with each other for business.

Now an agency’s competitors include Silicon Valley giants such as Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Facebook Inc., who are cutting out the middleman and working directly with advertisers. Meanwhile, a growing number of ad-agency clients are building in-house advertising capabilities. And consulting firms including Accenture , ACN -0.25% Deloitte and PricewaterhouseCoopers have been bolstering the services they offer clients by buying up ad agencies and design firms that craft things like apps, websites, events and even products.

Accenture Interactive has the largest marketing-services business among consulting firms. Its revenue increased 35% last year to $6.5 billion, and it has been ranked as the leading digital advertising network world-wide by Ad Age three years in a row.
Accenture  advertising_agencies  advertising  CMOs  management_consulting  marketing 
june 2018 by jerryking
A new boss for McKinsey - Firm direction
Mar 1st 2018

On February 25th the result of a long election process was made public. Kevin Sneader, the Scottish chairman of McKinsey’s Asia unit, will replace Dominic Barton as managing partner—the top job. He inherits a thriving business. The firm remains by far the biggest of the premium consultancies (see table). Over the past decade, annual revenues have doubled to $10bn; so too has the size of the partnership, to more than 2,000......Mr Barton claims that half of what it does today falls within capabilities that did not exist five years ago. It is working to ensure that customers turn to McKinseyites for help with all things digital. It has had to make acquisitions in some areas: recent purchases include QuantumBlack, an advanced-analytics firm in London, and LUNAR, a Silicon-Valley design company. It is increasingly recruiting outside the usual business schools to bring in seasoned data scientists and software developers.....McKinsey has kept plenty of older ones as clients, such as Hewlett Packard, but it has a lot more to do to crack new tech giants and unicorns (private startups worth more than $1bn). ....McKinsey’s response is to try to gain a foothold earlier on in tech firms’ life-cycles. It is targeting medium-sized companies, which would not have been able to afford its fees, by offering shorter projects with smaller “startup-sized” teams
appointments  CEOs  data_scientists  management_consulting  McKinsey  mergers_&_acquisitions  SMEs  software_developers 
march 2018 by jerryking
Boost your sales with tips from Warren Buffett
DECEMBER 18, 2012 | The Globe and Mail | by HARVEY SCHACHTER, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL.

How to Close a Deal Like Warren Buffett
By Tom Searcy and Henry DeVries
(McGraw-Hill, 217 pages, $24.95)

The authors recommend a process they call "the triples" that will help you make the case for your product or service:

Triple 1: The prospect's three problems

First, find out – and write down – the three biggest problems the prospect faces in the area your product or service can help. This aligns you with the buyer's interests.

Triple 2: Your three-part solution

Now think carefully about how you can solve each problem. As you write it out for the client, remember that generic language such as "improved," "better," and "big difference" are not that compelling. Use actual numbers and refer to specific pressure points to focus on the outcomes your prospect can expect.

Triple 3: Your three references

The third step is to identify at least three references you can share who have experienced similar outcomes when using your products and services. This may be sensitive, given confidentiality and competitive issues. But the authors stress: "The most effective way to get the attention of prospects is to drop the names of others just like them."

The authors urge you to become a student of psychology and develop profiles of members of the prospect's team. Try to determine each person's fears, since those qualms may send your pitch into the ditch. Determine each person's point of view about your solution, as well as any other personal trait or event that might be of importance. At the same time, study the team dynamics, from where people sit around the table to who they defer to.

The most dangerous person will be "the eel." The authors insist that "in every deal, and at every prospect's table, there is always an eel – a person who is against the deal. Always. Eels have a tendency to hang out in the shadows. They are hard to get to, and they usually talk you down when you're not around."

Usually eels are driven by fear that they don't want to acknowledge, so instead they insist they are against the deal on principle. They are dangerous, and must be identified early. Then you can try to co-opt them, taking the eel's ideas and baking them into your proposal.
Harvey_Schachter  deal-making  eels  Warren_Buffett  books  tips  salesmanship  pitches  think_threes  solutions  psychology  references  problems  obstacles  management_consulting  JCK  problem_solving  indispensable  enterprise_clients  aligned_interests 
august 2017 by jerryking
Technology, Media & Telecommunications Predictions 2017 |
Indoor mapping 101

Googled: "retail space" headwinds "indoor mapping".

Also, 17 best images about Retail Tech on Pinterest
Deloitte  management_consulting  location_based_services  navigation  mapping  beacons  sensors 
july 2017 by jerryking
Spencer Johnson, ‘Who Moved My Cheese?’ Author, Dies at 78 - The New York Times
“Who Moved My Cheese?,” which was published in 1998, was the story — in 94 pages of large type — of two mice, Sniff and Scurry, and two tiny people, Hem and Haw, looking for cheese in a maze. When the cheese supply runs out at Cheese Station C, the mice leave without angst to find more.

But Hem and Haw resist, refusing to accept change. Haw overcomes his anxiety and ventures out of his comfort zone — at first timidly, but then, gradually, with more confidence — in search of a new supply of cheese.

“Before long, he knew why he felt good,” Mr. Johnson wrote about Haw. “He stopped to write again on the wall: ‘When you stop being afraid, you feel good!’”
obituaries  '90s  metaphors  writers  authors  management_consulting 
july 2017 by jerryking
Explosion in data ushers in new high-tech era.pdf
December 5, 2016 | Financial Times | Ian Whylie.

However, one of the consequences of the introduction of AI into consulting will be greater clarification of consulting methodologies, predicts Harvey Lewis, Deloitte's UK artificial intelligence lead in technology consulting. There will be repeatable, common approaches that are supported by machines, and then a class of essentially human approaches for dealing with more varied, wide-ranging and uncertain problems........However, AI could also have a significant impact on the way strategy consultants do their job.

“Consulting firms have a lot of intellectual property locked up inside their consultants’ heads, which, if codified and converted into algorithms, can be used by computers instead,” he says. “This will allow computers to work on the repeatable consulting tasks by following prescribed methodologies, while the human consultants are freed to work on those projects where inputs, outputs and outcomes are more uncertain or which require greater creativity, subjectivity, social interaction and perceptiveness or human judgment.”

Clients want us to arrive, ready to load in their data, and provide insights on the first day of the project
Paul Daugherty. If consulting can be codified then the cost of performing certain types of consulting work is likely to fall, says Mr Lewis. This means that consulting can be offered to more organisations, such as start-ups, small and medium enterprises and charities that might not previously have been able to afford consulting services.

“The days of old-style consulting, where the work was centred around a bunch of people mulling over a PowerPoint presentation and analysis for the client, are either dead or dying fast,” says Mr Daugherty. “Increasingly, strategy consulting is moving to fast-paced database analysis, supported by machine learning. Clients will want us to arrive, ready to load in their data, understand the situation and particular dynamics of their business and provide insights on the first day of the project.”
Accenture  artificial_intelligence  automation  data  fast-paced  insights  machine_learning  management_consulting  PowerPoint  situational_awareness  virtual_agents 
april 2017 by jerryking
Transitioning Pro-Bono Service to Paid Accounts
(1) Doing so would be contrary to any consultant’s positioning. If consultants choose to give away advice, it should be because they truly care about the cause. Doing so with the expectation that it could be turned profitable would be disingenuous. (2) When your primary deliverable is incorporeal (advice, strategy, direction, etc.), getting a client to start paying for that kind of service after they’ve already been receiving it for free is very, very difficult- even if they say they are willing.
pro-bono  management_consulting  advice  strategy  disingenuous 
january 2017 by jerryking
Struggling to find work? Try creating your own infomercial - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Oct. 30, 2016

Jim Beqaj,'s book, True Fit. an executive coach and former president of CIBC Wood Gundy, who learned from being the wrong fit in two top executive posts that we need to be less automatic or desperate in taking on jobs and far more discriminating.

Answer four questions, which will form the heart of your infomercial:

(1) What should you pay me for? List the strengths you bring to the job. Not the normal bumph on a résumé--a clear listing of skills.

(2) Who do you work best with? Look through your life and list the people you liked working with – and why. They may have been big-picture thinkers, energetic, boisterous, decisive, or collaborative.

(3) How do I like to resolve conflict? Workplaces can have strikingly different methods for handling conflict and you don’t want to find yourself in the wrong camp.

“Your conflict-resolution style could be, for example, competitive. If you’re in an environment where avoidance and accommodation is the order of the day, you could be seen as a bully, not a team player.

(4) What’s my perfect day? Describe a day or a specific project you worked on in which you were so absorbed in what you were doing it didn’t feel like work.
job_search  JCK  management_consulting  Managing_Your_Career  Harvey_Schachter  conflict_resolution  infomercials  books  fit  strengths  personal_branding  self-worth 
november 2016 by jerryking
Silicon Valley’s Undertaker: ‘We’re Anticipating a Major Fallout’ - PE Hub
August 10, 2011 By Connie Loizos.

The Sherwood team of seasoned business professionals provides founders, shareholders and senior executives with more than a report – we at Sherwood go beyond traditional tactics to help make decisions and implement plans that achieve exceptional results.
Silicon_Valley  professional_service_firms  restructurings  bubbles  start_ups  founders  management_consulting 
november 2016 by jerryking
Engineer Extraordinaire, Charles Ceres, is a ‘Special Person’
Oct 30, 2016 | Kaieteur News | By Sharmain Grainger.

“I want people to remember Charles Ceres the person, not what profession I was in. Whatever I have acquired hasn’t changed me. The difference between me and a lot of people is that I know the difference between who I am and what I do…what I do is not who I am.”
Queen’s  alumni  engineering  humility  Afro-Guyanese  management_consulting  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship 
october 2016 by jerryking
New ROM CEO Joshua Basseches isn’t fazed by the major institution’s debt - The Globe and Mail
JAMES ADAMS
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Apr. 01, 2016

The ROM is “a singular institution in North America,” with “astonishing breadth” in it encyclopedic collections and “remarkable curatorial capacity,” he declared. It had close to 1.1 million visitors in 2015-16, likely the largest yearly attendance in the museum’s history. A show of Pompeii artifacts alone drew almost 275,000 visitors over six months or so.

Meanwhile, the Ontario Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport, under which ROM operates as a Crown corporation, claims to be “very pleased” with the museum’s activities while continuing to cover as much as 55 per cent of its operating expenses.
ROM  CEOs  first90days  HBS  management_consulting  debt 
april 2016 by jerryking
Lessons in listening | Evernote Web
February 6, 2016 | Financial Times | Simon Kuper

(1) Ask people about themselves. Actually listen.
(2) Banish the idea that the person you're listening to is boring and predictable.
(3) Shut up!!!!!
(4) Make an encouraging remark or ask for elucidation.
(5) Allow silences to exist/occur.
(6) Ask questions
(7) A consultant who, instead of telling clients what he has to offer, usually asks them, "what's top of mind?"....[they respond]...[you counter with] "it so happens that we've for just the product for that".
(8) If folks are truly boring, get them to talk about their lives.
(9). Seduce. Ask people, "so what do you think we should change around here?"
Simon_Kuper  listening  howto  dating  questions  management_consulting  prospecting 
february 2016 by jerryking
Bay Street’s next big struggle: keeping top young talent - The Globe and Mail
TIM KILADZE
Bay Street’s next big struggle: keeping top young talent
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Sep. 29, 2015
Bay_Street  Silicon_Valley  talent  work_life_balance  investment_banking  war_for_talent  management_consulting 
october 2015 by jerryking
Feeling uncertain, CEO? Better go on the attack - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, May. 05 2015

Taking control of uncertainty is the fundamental leadership challenge of our time … ” he writes in The Attacker’s Advantage. “The advantage now goes to those who create change, not just learn to live with it. Instead of waiting and reacting, such leaders immerse themselves in the ambiguities of the external environment, sort through them before things are settled and known, set a path, and steer the organization decisively onto it.”
Harvey_Schachter  Ram_Charan  uncertainty  algorithms  mathematics  data  management_consulting  anomalies  change  Jack_Welch  books  gurus  offense  data_driven  leadership  ambiguities  offensive_tactics 
may 2015 by jerryking
Engineering consultancy firm WSP Global soars to new heights - The Globe and Mail
NICOLAS VAN PRAET
MONTREAL — The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jan. 20 201
engineering  management_consulting 
january 2015 by jerryking
The man who mends careers and hearts - FT.com
December 11, 2014 12:23 pm
The man who mends careers and hearts
By Emma Jacobs
dating  relationships  management_consulting 
december 2014 by jerryking
Captaincy
There are reasons for traditions and arrangements. Sometimes they are good and sometimes not, but they are reasons, explanations grounded in some sort of experience. I had a conversation about this a ...
advice  biases  bias_for_improvement  bias_toward_change  institutional_knowledge  internal_systems  Jason_Isaacs  management_consulting  Peggy_Noonan 
november 2014 by jerryking
Beware The Consultant
Beware The Consultant
By
John Greathouse
– November 12, 2007
management_consulting  start_ups  fees_&_commissions 
march 2014 by jerryking
Starting a McKinsey for Small Businesses - NYTimes.com
December 17, 2013, 7:00 am 4 Comments
Starting a McKinsey for Small Businesses
By EILENE ZIMMERMAN
running_a_business  small_business  management_consulting 
december 2013 by jerryking
Bloomberg Focuses on Rest (as in Rest of the World) - NYTimes.com
December 14, 2013 | NYT | By MICHAEL BARBARO.

Bloomberg Associates will be a project that is the first concrete phase of a post-mayoral life that aides said would remain intensely focused on cities, long viewed by him as laboratories for large-scale experiments in public health, economic development and environmental sustainability.

Above all, the new endeavor reflects a profound confidence — never in short supply with this mayor — that it would behoove dozens of municipalities to replicate the ideas that defined his tenure: turning busy roads into pedestrian plazas, posting calorie counts in fast-food chains, creating a customer-service hotline for citizens....The consulting group is the latest chapter in Mr. Bloomberg’s long journey from political neophyte to much-admired mentor to fellow mayors, dozens of whom have flocked to City Hall to study his open-seat bullpen layout, attended his conferences about urban innovation and applied for grants from his foundation (called “mayors’ school” by several city leaders who have spent time there).
Michael_Bloomberg  New_York_City  Second_Acts  management_consulting  hotlines  data  data_driven  cities  mayoral  large-scale  public_health  economic_development  sustainability  environment 
december 2013 by jerryking
The future of the Firm
September 21st 2013 | The Economist | Schumpeter.

Life is getting tougher for professional-services firms. Midsized consultancies are already suffering: Monitor Group went bankrupt last year—Deloitte later bought it for $120m—and Booz & Co and Roland Berger are agonising about their futures. If the legal profession is anything to go by, worse is to come: Dewey & LeBoeuf collapsed last year after borrowing heavily in a dash for growth, and other elite law firms are struggling to win business....Are McKinsey’s best days behind it? Two new publications offer some interesting answers. “The Firm”, by Duff McDonald, is a generally admiring book that nevertheless asks hard questions about the organisation’s future. “Consulting on the Cusp of Disruption”, by Clayton Christensen and two colleagues, is a penetrating article in the October Harvard Business Review, arguing that the comfortable world of the strategy consultancies is about to be turned upside down....Eden McCallum cuts costs by deploying freelancers, most of whom once worked for the big three. BeyondCore replaces overpriced junior analysts with Big Data, crunching vast amounts of information to identify trends.
McKinsey  capitalism  professional_service_firms  barbell_effect  HBR  Clayton_Christensen  books  BCG  Bain  alumni  management_consulting  mid-sized  law_firms  hard_questions 
november 2013 by jerryking
Do Things that Don't Scale
July 2013 | Paul Graham

The question to ask about an early stage startup is not "is this company taking over the world?" but "how big could this company get if the founders did the right things?" And the right things often seem both laborious and inconsequential at the time.
advice  start_ups  Y_Combinator  Paul_Graham  scaling  recruiting  experience  management_consulting  barriers_to_entry  product_launches  partnerships  customer_acquisition  user_growth  Steve_Jobs  unscalability  founders  questions 
november 2013 by jerryking
How foodies influence the things we eat - The Globe and Mail
Aug. 27 2013 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY.

Foodies’ impact on the industry has never been greater. “Particularly over the last five years, we’ve seen a real, dramatic shift in consumer behaviour as it relates to food,” says Robert Carter, executive director of food service at NPD, a market research company,...Taking on the mantle of a foodie brand means that already food-obsessed product developers have to work harder to stay on top of the trends than ever before. And at the same time, they have to be careful not to jump on every bandwagon – it’s a fine balance between finding the next hot item and becoming too niche.

To draw inspiration, they go where the foodies are. That means eating out in restaurants regularly and attending food shows. But it goes even farther; most trends are informed by international cuisine, and so Loblaws developers spend a lot of time on planes....Geoff Wilson, president of food-service consulting firm FSstrategy.
Loblaws  foodies  Susan_Krashinsky  management_consulting  food  product_development 
october 2013 by jerryking
The strategy consultants in search of a strategy - FT.com
August 28, 2013 | FT | By John Gapper.
The strategy consultants in search of a strategy

Two decades ago, 70 per cent of McKinsey’s revenues were from strategy and corporate finance but most now flow from hands-on work on risk, operations and marketing.
management_consulting  strategy  professional_service_firms  McKinsey  BCG  Bain  Monitor  Deloitte  winner-take-all 
september 2013 by jerryking
Hiring Outside Advisers Is as Important as Hiring Employees - NYTimes.com
January 24, 2013, 1:00 pmComment
Hiring Outside Advisers Is as Important as Hiring Employees
By JOSH PATRICK
running_a_business  hiring  management_consulting  small_business  due_diligence 
january 2013 by jerryking
Good News and Bad News: THE STRATEGY CONSULTING VALUE CHAIN IS BREAKING UP
March 2005 | Consulting to Management |by SASCHA L. SCHMIDT, PATRICK VOGT, ANSGAR RICHTER.

I retrieved this article in connection with a-connect interview
strategy  management_consulting  value_chains  frameworks  disaggregation  McKinsey  bad_news 
january 2013 by jerryking
A six-point checklist for hiring consultants
Jan. 02 2013 | The Globe and Mail | HARVEY SCHACHTER,
Special to The Globe and Mail

David Fields, a consultant on hiring consultants, offers in his new book, The Executive’s Guide to Consultants: key points-
1. Why are we considering an outside expert?
2. What are our desired outcomes?

3. When will we know we’re on the right track?

4. What risks do we face?

5. What is the value of taking on this project?

6. Which parameters will limit or affect the project?
Harvey_Schachter  management_consulting  risks  checklists  book_reviews  questions  hiring  outcomes  JCK 
january 2013 by jerryking
Five key traits of successful consultants - The Globe and Mail
Harvey Schachter

Special to The Globe and Mail

Last updated Monday, Sep. 24 2012,

Intellectual Capacity

You have to be smart, well-trained and experienced – and have the educational credentials to back you up, be it an MBA or specialized training in your specific field of focus. “Competition for management consultants is likely to remain keen, and those with the most education and experience will have the best prospects,” she writes. Maturity and lots of contacts from a long career can be helpful; younger individuals have youth on their side but should expand their portfolio through as many varied experiences as possible.

Self-Confidence

You must be strong and confident about your abilities, but also low maintenance, ego in check. Although a hired hand for the organizations you work with, you must be a leader, motivating others and working in a collaborative way to nudge clients to solutions they might not have reached on their own.

Moxie

You need courage, energy, vision – and spunk. “It is the capacity to go against the common view, to walk into a room of fractious stakeholders who don’t support the evaluation and don’t want to hear about the findings. It is the ability to land in a strange town at midnight, scrape the snow and ice off your rental car, and locate your motel without the benefit of a map. It is being able to get up the day after you have lost the best proposal you have ever written and start all over again,” she notes.

Adaptability

Your work is defined by the rigid parameters set out by proposals and contracts, but you must still be light on your feet as you operate with the whole world in a state of flux. Try to keep your proposals more open-ended to handle unexpected issues that will inevitably crop up as you progress with your work.

Endurance

Some people enter the field viewing it as a stopgap between paid employment, while others view consulting as offering independence that will be a welcome relief to the stultifying atmosphere in the organizations where they have worked.
ksfs  Harvey_Schachter  management_consulting  self-confidence  personality_types/traits  character_traits  chutzpah  endurance  adaptability  individual_initiative  open-ended 
october 2012 by jerryking
Billable Hours
September 22, 2000 | Redherring.com | Rafe Needleman
management_consulting  fees_&_commissions  billing  fees 
september 2012 by jerryking
Finance executive brings innovative strategies to Kenyan business
September 1, 2012 | Report on Business | Paul Waldie.

With the help of contributions from the Sprott Foundation and Barrick Gold Corp., Mr. Di Girolamo created Terra Firma, a Canadian charity that provides business expertise to small businesses in developing countries. The organization began working in Kenya, first with a small food company and lately with a honey business based outside Nairobi called Honey Care Africa. Honey Care has seven full-time employees and about $200,000 in annual sales. Volunteers from Terra Firma have been helping the company revamp its operations, which includes managing bee hives at numerous farms, and improving its marketing. Terra Finna draws volunteers from Canadian businesses and the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management, many of whom have travelled to Kenya to work with the companies. Mr. Di Girolamo left for Kenya We believe that business can be part of the solution to world issues.
Paul_Waldie  philanthropy  Brookfield  charities  Kenya  small_business  management_consulting  inspiration  Rotman  developing_countries 
september 2012 by jerryking
Build a Practice Niche by Assisting Clients with Business Planning
Dec 1991 | The Practical Accountant | by Mark Scally and Mark C. Smitt.
Smaller companies tend not to have any formal business plans, and those that do often fail to implement them properly. Accountants ran assist their clients wlth the business planning process. The process must be tallored for each company's unique characteristics, and every consultant uses a slightly different process. The following process has been adapted from the traditional model to fit the typical closely held business: 1. Analyze internal and external factors. 2. Develop a mlssion statement. 3. Set goals. 4. Develop a marketing and sales strategy. 5. Perform financial projections. 6. Draft action plans. 7. lmplement the plan. 8. Put the proper organizational structure and management team in place. 9. Implement the necessary information systems. The planning process gives closely held companies a comprehensive approach for responding to uncertain economic times.
business_planning  management_consulting  niches  small_business  privately_held_companies  JCK  uncertainty  action_plans  mission_statements  goal-setting  implementation  organizational_structure  formalization  professionalization 
august 2012 by jerryking
Fashion Journal - WSJ.com
August 23, 2007

Case Study: Dressing for a Naked CEO
What to Wear to the Office Is Complex Issue for Consultants; From Pinstripes to Jeans

By CHRISTINA BINKLEY
management_consulting  howto  mens'_clothing  Christina_Binkley 
august 2012 by jerryking
Positive Thinking
January 31, 2011 | Financial Times | Andrew Baxter.
Rwanda  Africa  Wharton  Monitor  management_consulting  positive_thinking 
august 2012 by jerryking
Danny Meyer Brings His Hospitality Expertise to Broadway - WSJ.com
August 8, 2012 | WSJ | By JENNIFER MALONEY.

Danny Meyer, the chief executive of Union Square Hospitality Group and founder of Union Square Cafe, Gramercy Tavern and other New York restaurants has teamed up with Jordan Roth, president of Jujamcyn Theaters, creating special hospitality workshops in hopes of turning pans into raves....About 250 full-time employees from all of Jujamcyn's theaters and its corporate office have attended the workshops led by Mr. Meyer's consulting firm, Hospitality Quotient. At a session in a theater-district restaurant in May, the Walter Kerr Theatre's ushers, ticket takers, porters and box-office staff brainstormed scenarios....Hospitality Quotient and Jujamcyn declined to discuss the financial details of their arrangement. Jujamcyn said it is spending about $275,000 for the workshops and to cover the labor costs for staff to attend....Other theater operators say they, too, are trying to make going to the theater more comfortable. "We're all trying to make the experience better. … The theater owners are all taking steps, individually and collectively," said Nick Scandalios, executive vice president of the Nederlander Organization, which owns nine Broadway theaters. All three Broadway landlords participate in an audience-rewards program that offers points redeemable for tickets and seat upgrades, he said.

One challenge the effort faces: the tight space constraints of landmark buildings in which renovations would be costly or not permitted.
Danny_Meyer  customer_experience  customer_service  Broadway  loyalty_management  workshops  hospitality  theatre  management_consulting  experience  experiential_marketing 
august 2012 by jerryking
Stephen R. Covey, Herald of Good Habits, Dies at 79 - NYTimes.com
By DOUGLAS MARTIN
Published: July 16, 2012

:

1. Be proactive

2. Begin with the end in mind

3. Put first things first

4. Think “win-win.”

5. Seek first to understand, then to be understood

6. Synergize

7. Sharpen the saw; that is, undergo frequent self-renewal.

creative_renewal  GTD  habits  management_consulting  obituaries  proactivity  productivity  self-renewal 
july 2012 by jerryking
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