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jerryking : managing_change   5

Red-Hot Skill: Managing in Gray Areas - WSJ - WSJ
By JOANN S. LUBLIN
Nov. 4, 2014

At a turbulent time in business, more U.S. companies pick and promote executives who thrive amid ambiguity, coaches and recruiters say. These leaders don’t flinch at uncertainty, surprises, conflicting directions, multiple demands—or knotty problems with no clear answers.
Managing_Your_Career  Joann_S._Lublin  uncertainty  red-hot  adversity  surprises  critical_thinking  managing_change  ambiguities  turbulence 
november 2014 by jerryking
Big Changes Drive Small Carpet Firm - WSJ.com
October 30, 2006 | WSJ | By PHRED DVORAK
Theory & Practice
Big Changes Drive Small Carpet Firm
Hong Kong's Tai Ping Sets Global Growth on Overhaul In Management, Marketing

The small Hong Kong carpet maker hired an American chief executive who had never been to Asia and installed him in New York. It revamped its executive team, centralized marketing and acquired a high-end carpet maker in the U.S...."We're trying to create a minimultinational," says director John Ying, who helped push Tai Ping in its new direction.... small companies can -- and sometimes must -- globalize as much as big ones....
globalization  CEOs  Hong_Kong  small_business  howto  carpets  multinationals  microproducers  tips  marketing  strategy  management  turnarounds  metrics  managing_change 
february 2013 by jerryking
Change or die: could adland be the new Detroit?
Feb 18, 2011|Campaign |Amelia Torode (head of strategy and innovation at VCCP and the chair of the IPA Strategy Group) and Tracey Follows ( head of planning at VCCP)...

As the world changed with the globalisation of markets, the transformative power of digital technologies and a shift in consumer demand, the automotive industry and the city of Detroit did not. At a fundamental level, nothing changed. Detroit failed to adapt, failed to evolve.

We have started to ask ourselves: is adland the new Detroit?

Data: find stories in numbers

It's time to reimagine our role. We're no longer solving problems but investigating mysteries; no longer taking a brief, rather taking on a case. Like a detective, we start with behaviour, looking for patterns and anomalies. We assume that what we're being told is not entirely the "truth" so search for information that is given from various perspectives and tend to believe our eyes more than our ears.

Imagine the implications for how we approach data. Seen through the lens of "mystery", we're not simply seeing data as a stream of numbers but as a snapshot of behaviour and an insight into human nature. What we do with data is the same thing we do when we sit on a park bench or at a pavement café - people-watching,albeit from desktops. It's human stories hidden within numbers, and it takes away the fear that surrounds "big data".
shifting_tastes  data-driven  data_journalism  Detroit  advertising_agencies  data  storytelling  massive_data_sets  adaptability  evolution  United_Kingdom  Publicis  managing_change  sense-making  insights  behaviours  patterns  anomalies  assumptions  automotive_industry  human_experience  curiosity  consumer_behavior 
december 2012 by jerryking
Quick-Change Artists May Find Fast Route to Executive Positions
May. 9, 1995 | WSJ | HAL LANCASTER

HERE'S A HOT career tip for the truly ambitious: Be a change agent.

Change agents, i.e. corporate alchemists who can reinvent a company's culture and operations, are the Holy Grail of executive searches these days....with so many companies looking for new brooms to sweep away their cobwebs, every manager or consultant on the prowl for bigger responsibilities wants to be one. But job seekers beware, because these positions _ which can range from unit heads to CEOs _ can be booby traps. CEOs love the idea of change, but the actual practice can be a blow to their egos.

Recruiter Dennis Krieger tells of the executive brought in to revamp the financial department of an industrial distributor. Four months later, the CEO wanted to fire him for being ``too aggressive and upsetting too many people,'' Mr. Krieger says. The CEO reconsidered after conceding the executive had met his goals.

``They say they want you to question everything, but they don't really want that,'' says Terry Gallagher, executive vice president of Battalia Winston in New York...a wise change agent often is more of a prod than a broom. ``A real change agent isn't someone who's going to make a lot of changes,'' Mr. Herz says. They're diplomats and motivators who will ``change the mood'' so those around them can make changes....investigate before accepting a job. A conservative approach, says executive recruiter Rex T. Olsen of Enterchange Executive Horizons, is to look for a company where change has already begun. ``Management may say it wants change, but if nothing is going on, how can you tell?''
executive_management  movingonup  change  Hal_Lancaster  Managing_Your_Career  organizational_change  organizational_culture  organizational_design  change_agents  managing_change  executive_search 
december 2012 by jerryking
When Uncertainty Is A Constant, You Can Still Plan for Surprises
April 7, 1998 | WSJ | By HAL LANCASTER.

one of the few certainties in today's tumultuous business world: About all anyone can expect is the unexpected.

Hal Lancaster answers readers' questions on career issues in Career Corner. Send your questions or comments by e-mail to hlancast@wsj.com .

Between mergers and restructurings, new technology and intensified global competition, "change is accelerating," says Dallas management consultant Price Pritchett, who specializes in change management. "The more change and the faster it comes at us, the easier it is for us to get blindsided."

But isn't the ability to cope with the unexpected genetically coded? "Some people have a high need for structure and don't like to wing it." Still, anyone can get better at dealing with surprises.

Here are some other effective strategies:

* Figure out what you can control.

* Plan tight and play loose. "deep planning," or considering all conceivable scenarios and what-ifs. But won't the unexpected foil the best-laid plans? "The better job we do planning, the better we'll do improvising, because we'll understand the situation better,"

* Develop solutions. In a soon-to-be-released booklet on innovation that he is publishing for clients, Dr. Pritchett draws lessons from the 1997 Mars Pathfinder mission. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory talked about "crafting solutions that were tolerant to the uncertainties" of such a project,

* Separate fact from assumptions.

To make good decisions, you need good information. In turbulent times, Mr. Postons observes, "people get suspicious, they get paranoid and that's when they get frozen."

* Do something.In an environment of high-velocity change, Dr. Pritchett says, remember the perils of passivity. "You have to keep moving forward, knowing that in this blurry, fast-moving world, you're going to have to drive on fog lights much of the time."

Concentrating on a plan of action and lining up others to help can turn despair into accomplishment, Dr. Stoltz says. The strategy, he adds, is "whiner-proof and solution-oriented."
Hal_Lancaster  Managing_Your_Career  uncertainty  adversity  surprises  critical_thinking  managing_change  unexpected  cost_of_inaction  assumptions  change  resilience  tumultuous  constant_change  solutions  solution-finders  accelerated_lifecycles  action_plans  span_of_control  momentum  blindsided  blind_spots  beyond_one's_control  JPL  next_play 
december 2012 by jerryking

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