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jerryking : marathons   18

Five ways training for a marathon inspired me as an entrepreneur - The Globe and Mail
DAVID SCHNURMAN
Young Entrepreneur Council
Published Tuesday, Jul. 29 2014

1. Keep your commitment. In business, you can’t let difficult challenges prevent you from following through with a plan.

What get one through these hard times is the commitment you make and a strong belief in wanting to break it.

2. Have a clear goal and strong plan. Many entrepreneurs grow their businesses by using their gut and intuition. When you hit adversity, not having a plan isn’t always the smartest choice.

A great thing about the marathon is that there is a clear goal of 26.2 miles and a proven training schedule. Since I didn’t have to put any additional thought into the goal or plan, I was able to focus all my energy on being mentally tough enough to keep up with the 30+ mile weeks and any life challenges that got in the way.

It made me realize the stronger my convictions are in my business goals and in my plan to get there, the more mentally tough I will become.

3. Go in with the right mindset. As business owners, we focus on outside challenges such as raising money, managing a team or acquiring new customers. While all of these issues are important and need to be addressed, they do not hold a candle to the internal challenges that we face on a daily basis: stress, self doubt, negativity, loss of focus, blaming others, fear of failure, etc.

If you have the right mindset and a positive attitude, no outside force can stop you in your journey to success. When training for the marathon, I turned to inspirational speeches and videos that I could listen to while I ran. Without these videos playing in a loop, it would have been hard for me to get through some of the tougher moments. You should apply the same type of inspirational experience sharing to business. It allows you to take the 10,000 foot-view and work on the business instead of in it.

4. Run through the wall. In business, we come up against walls all the time. They key is having the right partner or mentor to help see you through it.

While training, I was told that after mile 20 the same thing happens in the marathon. It happened at mile 23 of my first marathon; I hit a wall. My feet were burning and my legs had shooting pains. All the signals in my body were telling me to stop running. But I was lucky enough to have a more experienced running partner who kept pushing me the additional 30 minutes. He motivated me and kept my focus on the finish line instead of the pain.

In business, we all can benefit from other people’s expertise to get through the pain and hit our big goals.

5. Experience new things. Too often in life we get caught up in a daily routine. Luckily, as entrepreneurs, it’s in our DNA to shake it up and learn new things. During training, I ran through almost every NYC neighborhood and found that I can develop a deep focus for hours on end. I read new books that inspired me, met new people and took part in over a dozen races.

I have transformed my mentality from someone who never ran further than 4 miles to a marathon runner. Now, the sky is the limit.
commitments  convictions  entrepreneur  gut_feelings  hard_times  intrinsically_motivated  lessons_learned  marathons  mindsets  owners  positive_thinking  running 
august 2014 by jerryking
Marathon Runners Stop Aging Out of the Race - WSJ.com
October 29, 2012 | WSJ| By KEVIN HELLIKER
Marathon Runners Stop Aging Out of the Race
More People Over 50 Are Finishing the 26.2-Mile Races; Health Benefits, But Training, Injury Concerns, Too
marathons  running  aging 
october 2012 by jerryking
The Fleeting Benefits of Marathon Running - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 6, 2009 | | KEVIN HELLIKER

The Fleeting Benefits of Marathons
Many Newcomers Race, but Few Follow Through With Lifelong Exercise
running  marathons  fitness  exercise  lifelong 
october 2011 by jerryking
Terry Fox and the marathons yet to come
Sep. 20, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Editorial . Terry's run,
a marathon a day for an astounding 143 days, which ended 30 years ago
this month when his cancer returned, offers many practical lessons. The
first lesson is to have a bullheaded belief in oneself. The second
lesson is that seemingly impossible was built on a thousand small
tasks.. The third lesson is to have a purpose larger than oneself. The
fourth lesson is in overcoming pain, or any large obstacle to meeting
one’s goals -- the power of grit, determination and courage. The fifth
lesson is that no foe is too big to fight. The sixth lesson is that
anyone who subscribes to the first five lessons can do it. Terry Fox was
what people sometimes call, clumsily, an ordinary Canadian. He was not
rich; his parents were not famous.
Canadian  cancers  consistency  courage  determination  editorials  grit  heroes  lessons_learned  marathons  overambitious  perseverance  persistence  purpose  self-confidence  small_wins  Terry_Fox 
september 2010 by jerryking
Running Wild - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 3, 2006 | Wall Street Journal | by JON WEINBACH.
running  exercise  marathons  extreme_sports 
may 2009 by jerryking
Time to Train for Your First Marathon - Well Blog - NYTimes.com
May 18, 2009, 11:28 am
Time to Train for Your First Marathon
By Tara Parker-Pope
running  exercise  fitness  marathons  training 
may 2009 by jerryking

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