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jerryking : market_opportunities   10

5-Step Primer to Entering New Markets
| Inc.com | BY KARL STARK AND BILL STEWART, Co-founders, Avondale.

Expanding into a new market can be an effective way to leverage your core business for growth. But it takes a disciplined process to accurately assess the potential of each growth opportunity, because a bad bet can bog down your business.

Investing the appropriate level of resources in market analysis, selection, and entry method can create a foundation for success in the chosen market. We suggest following five steps to properly assess the opportunities and risks of a new market.

1. Define the Market
2. Perform Market Analysis
3. Assess Internal Capabilities
4. Prioritize and Select Markets
5. Develop Market Entry Options
marketing  growth  core_businesses  market_entry  new_markets  capabilities  frameworks  market_definition  market_analysis  self-assessment  market_opportunities  market_assessment  generating_strategic_options  assessments_&_evaluations  opportunities  Michael_McDerment  primers 
october 2016 by jerryking
Securable Market | Strategyn
In all the traditional market definitions, the size of a market hinges on the number of buyers who might exist for a particular market offer. But we know that market offers (i.e., products) are merely point-in-time solutions that help customers get jobs done. The jobs customers are trying to get done do not change over time. They are stable.

In contrast to traditional methods based on products and price, Strategyn uses jobs, outcomes, and the opportunity algorithm to calculate the size of a market opportunity and the market share that can be captured by a new solution. Strategyn calls the resulting number the securable market to distinguish it from traditional addressable market definitions and to highlight that it is calculated with different inputs.
market_sizing  market_segmentation  Theodore_Levitt  disruption  customer_experience  differentiation  new_categories  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  market_opportunities 
november 2014 by jerryking
If BlackBerry is sold, Canada faces an innovation vacuum - The Globe and Mail
Aug. 17 2013 | The Globe and Mail | KONRAD YAKABUSKI.

The sale and breakup of a flagship technology company is a reoccurring theme in Canadian business. But this time is different. If BlackBerry Ltd. goes, there is no ready replacement. That’s a telling switch from the situation Canada faced with the sale of Newbridge Networks in 2000 and the demise of Nortel Networks in 2009....Canada has an innovation bottleneck. An abundance of science is generated in university labs and start-up firms but most of it never finds its way into commercial applications. Risk-averse banks and too many businesses of the bird-in-the-hand variety remain the weak links in Canada’s innovation system.

“We punch above our weight in idea generation,” observes Michael Bloom, who leads the Conference Board of Canada’s Centre for Business Innovation. “But the further you move towards commercialization, the weaker we get as a country.”....Innovation can be driven by any sector, even the old-economy resource extraction business of the oil sands. But tech firms remain by far the most R&D-intensive players in any economy.

Hence, the tech sector is a key barometer of a country’s innovation strength. And innovation matters because it has a profound influence on our living standards – it is “the key long-run driver of productivity and income growth,” ...Canadian businesses remain oddly complacent.

“We tend in this county not to look at the true market opportunity of innovation,” Mr. Bloom adds. “If you only see a market of 35 million people, you’re going to see more risk than if you see the market as Europe, the U.S. and Asia. Americans see risk, but also great opportunity.”

It’s no coincidence that many of Canada’s greatest entrepreneurs and innovators have been immigrants. Unlike his American counterpart, the average Canadian business graduate does not dream of becoming the next Sergey Brin, Steve Jobs or, for that matter, Peter Munk.

Mr. Lazaridis and ex-BlackBerry co-CEO Jim Balsillie notwithstanding, how many Canadian entrepreneurs and innovators have truly changed the world, or aspire? By all accounts, not that many. A Conference Board study released last month found that only 10 per cent of Canadian firms (almost all of them small ones) pursue “radical or revolutionary” innovations. Large firms focus at best on “incremental” innovations.
Blackberry  bottlenecks  commercialization  competitiveness_of_nations  complacency  hollowing_out  Konrad_Yakabuski  Newbridge  Nortel  innovation  idea_generation  ecosystems  breakthroughs  incrementalism  large_companies  sellout_culture  Jim_Balsillie  moonshots  immigrants  Canada  Peter_Munk  market_opportunities  weak_links  thinking_big  oil_sands  resource_extraction  marginal_improvements  innovation_vacuum  punch-above-its-weight  This_Time_is_Different 
august 2013 by jerryking
Surfing the Silver Tsunami
One quarter of CEOs say they can’t pursue market opportunities or strategic initiatives because they don’t have the talent they need. And you thought the economy was sluggish! Fact is, the en masse departure of the Baby Boom from the workforce is creating some critical gaps, and human resources professionals and recruiters are working hard to fill them.
talent_management  talent  aging  baby_boomers  grey_tsunami  human_resources  Ivey  alumni  demographic_changes  market_opportunities  retirement  bow_wave 
october 2012 by jerryking
The Young & Restless of Technology Finance
November 1993| The Red Herring | Anthony B. Perkins.

We think that marketing is everything. We try to help our companies figure out what is going to set them apart. We encourage companies to define their biggest risks-up front, work hard to put the risks behind them, and then move forward with very innovative marketing...During the interview process, you see whether entrepreneurs have passion and tenacity. The hardest thing to determine is their ability to stick-to-it. Entrepreneurs need to be very dynamic, wi11ing to adjust. And that's why an important part of our process is checking references, we have to be convinced the entrepreneur has never give up, even when things get tough. In other words, when Plan A work, because Plan A never works, we like to hear entrepreneurs say "That's O.K.,Plan B is on its way. I've twisted this valve and turned this knob and I really think we've figured it out." What we don't like to hear is "Well,it didn't work out...sorry." We also like to see entrepreneurs who are singularly focused on building -great products that fill distinct market needs. We are less interested in people who like nice digs, hype,and PR.

Moritz: ‘We have a very tight on making sure there is a sizable market opportunity in front. of us before we make an investment. We are much more focused on market growth potential and the ability for a company to reach a market successfully and profitably. We have also demonstrated as a firm and individually the ability to get companies off the ground with a small amount of fuel. We like to start wicked infernos with a single match rather than two million gallons of kerosene. This is clearly a differentiated way of getting a company put together. This approach has terrific benefits for the people who start the companies and for all our limited partners. You might say that we have a morbid fascination with our ROI, as opposed no the amount of dollars we put to work. And this is a very different message than you get from a lot of other venture firms.
The: HERRING: How often does a Sequoia partner actually go in and help operate a company?

Moritz: Pierre is the great unsung hero of Cisco Systems. He spent a tremendous amount of time at the company. working behind the scenes helping to make sure the engineering department was designing and getting new products to market. People don't realize the significant contribution Pierre made to Cisco because Don's name is on the hubcaps as the chairman of the company. The ability we have to help operate companies is a useful tool in our arsenal.

The HERRING: Sequoia's image on the streets of Silicon Valley is that you are the Los Angeles Raiders of venture capital--the tough guys who are quicker than the other firms to boot the CEO or pull the financial plug.
Moritz: We are congenitally incapable of pouring good money after bad. Some people. for their own will thrust us into a position to be harbingers of bad new to management, which is all right. But we do not want to continue propping up a company if we think its chances for success have evaporated. We would be wasting our money as individuals and wasting the money of our limited partners. There have been very few instances where we decided to stop funding a company and have regretted it.
The HERRING: What ’s the hardest part of your job?
Moritz: We usually don't make mistakes when it comes to assessing market opportunity. And we are reasonably accurate in predicting how long it will take to bring a product to market. The great imponderable is to judge accurately and predict how well a president is going to be able to run the business. It is easy to mistake the facade for reality
The HERRING: ‘What characteristics does Sequoia look for in a company president?
Moritz: Frugality, competitiveness. confidence, and paranoia.
venture_capital  vc  howto  Kleiner_Perkins  Sequoia  career_paths  Michael_Moritz  no_regrets  endurance  frugality  competitiveness  paranoia  self-confidence  market_sizing  market_windows  team_risk  market_opportunities  ambitions  large_markets  sticktoitiveness  entrepreneur  perseverance  indispensable  Plan_B  off-plan  champions  reference-checking  unknowns  assessments_&_evaluations  opportunities  unsentimental  wishful_thinking  illusions  overambitious 
july 2012 by jerryking
Autobytel Inc.; Autobytel Debuts Innovative, Cost-Effective Local Marketing Opportunity for Nation's Dealers
Anonymous. Journal of Transportation. Atlanta: Feb 25, 2008.
pg. 16. How LocalConnect Works

For new vehicle dealers, the ads displaying special offers (updated
weekly) are exclusive to each dealership brand in the consumer's area
and are targeted to appear at relevant points during consumer research
activity. For example, if a consumer is researching the brand the dealer
carries, the local dealership's marketing messages and an 800 number
that dials directly into the dealership will automatically appear,
together with the opportunity to click through to view special offers as
well as customized video demonstrations and slideshows spotlighting
specific dealer inventory. Each ad's effectiveness is tracked with
detailed activity reports including amount of time spent viewing the ad,
click-throughs, emails and phone calls with playback.
ProQuest  online_advertising  websites  marketing  market_opportunities  City_Voice  classified_ads  second_hand  shopping  retention  local 
july 2010 by jerryking

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