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jerryking : market_research   61

Bezos on why failure is not failure
April 11, 2019 | By | FT Alphaville : Izabella Kaminska

According to Bezos no customer was asking for Echo before it was launched, thus Amazon's foray into listening tech was definitely them wandering. And yet, if they'd listened to market research (a firm no thank you!) they'd have lost out on more than 100 million sales of Alexa-enabled devices. So there.
Alexa  Amazon  Amazon_Echo  AWS  big_bets  experimentation  failure  Jeff_Bezos  large_companies  market_research  scaling 
april 2019 by jerryking
How to Develop a Product Strategy: 3 Ways Market Research Can Help
Market research can assist businesses with their product strategy by identifying growth opportunities. When developing a strategy, businesses must consider how their product or service solves consumer problems, how their product is different from others and how their competitors address the same consumer needs.
market_research  new_products 
january 2018 by jerryking
'Virtual fieldwork' is no substitute for travel
Oct. 10, 2015| FT | Tyler Brule
From time to time this column takes on the part-time role of concierge for its readers. The requests that come across this desk are not unlike those that greet the men...
travel  due_diligence  concierge_services  market_research  sleuthing  primary_field_research  research_methods  Tyler_Brûlé  interpretation  forecasting 
november 2015 by jerryking
Traders Seek an Edge With High-Tech Snooping - WSJ.com
Dec. 18, 2013 | WSJ | By Michael Rothfeld and Scott Patterson.

A growing industry uses surveillance and data-crunching technology to supply traders with nonpublic information.

Genscape's clients include banks such as Goldman Sachs Group Inc., J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. and Deutsche Bank AG, hedge funds including Citadel LLC and large energy-trading outfits such as Trafigura Beheer BV. Surveillance and analysis of the oil, electricity and natural-gas sectors can run Genscape clients more than $300,000 a year.
surveillance  data_driven  slight_edge  traders  hedge_funds  sleuthing  Genscape  sensors  commodities  corporate_espionage  competitive_intelligence  scuttlebutt  due_diligence  market_research  exclusivity  investment_research  research_methods  LBMA  nonpublic  primary_field_research  banks  Citadel  oil_industry  natural_gas  snooping  alternative_data  informational_advantages  imagery  satellites  infrared  electric_power 
december 2013 by jerryking
Why retailers love customers who shop on their smartphones - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 18 2013 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY.
The study found that, unsurprisingly, even the most plugged-in consumers do not tend to click on digital ads. Of the smartphone owners surveyed, two-thirds said they “rarely” or “never” click on online advertisements, with the minority reporting that they do so regularly. It helps when an ad is personalized. In that case, 49 per cent said they would regularly click on ads. But even then, just over half still said they would rarely or never consider it. The greatest opportunity for marketers is arguably not in advertising to those digitally connected consumers; it is in offering them something they will find useful....“We are witnessing a seismic change in consumer behaviour due to the emergence of social and digital platforms and the significance and ubiquity of mobile as a consumer platform,” Mr. Schultz told analysts on a conference call in April to discuss the company’s earnings. The data Starbucks can now collect on those users are crucial for it as a marketer.

“Retail has historically been a rather anonymous transaction for many,” said Lori Bieda, executive lead for consumer intelligence at SAS Canada. “… Mobile makes a consumer known to retailers.”...The SAS research showed that people want their phones to act as “personal shoppers.” Those surveyed said they would be more likely to return to a store that sent them offers on their mobile devices – but that’s highly contingent on those offers being relevant and targeted to that person’s preferences.
bricks-and-mortar  consumer_behavior  customer_loyalty  Indigo  market_research  mobile_applications  mobile_phones  online_advertising  personal_shoppers  retailers  seismic_shifts  smartphones  Starbucks  Susan_Krashinsky 
july 2013 by jerryking
The Four Best (and Worst) Uses of Market Research| Page 2
April 9 2013 | | ChiefExecutive.net | Chief Executive Magazine | by Taddy Hall

Experience and research suggest that CEOs of many companies look for growth in the wrong places and in the wrong ways, thereby missing opportunities and leaving them for the newbies. In a sense, though, this is good news: success lies in doing things differently, not spending more.

Specifically, there are four approaches organizations often take, none of which reliably lead to the actionable insights business leaders need:

Seek and profile large, growing and profitable markets
Solicit feedback from current best customers
Segment markets based on customer attributes, such as demographics, or based on product characteristics like “high end” vs. “low end,” “regular” vs. “light,” etc.
Benchmark progress against competitors

In each case, it is easy to see why an industry leader might have interest in the findings; however, these outputs speak primarily to aspects of the existing business or to the franchises of other established players. In other words, mapping current demand reveals little to nothing of the less-visible latent demand that is essential fuel for transformational innovation. As Henry Ford mused a hundred years ago: if he’d asked folks what they wanted, they would have asked for faster horses. Echoing Ford, Steve Jobs noted that consumers can’t describe what they’ve never experienced.
market_research  disruption  Clayton_Christensen  high-end  latent  insights  growth  opportunities  transformational  customer_insights  innovation  large_markets  market_segmentation  customer_risk  actionable_information  hidden  Henry_Ford  Steve_Jobs  market_share  static  dynamic  segmentation  missed_opportunities  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  unarticulated_desires 
april 2013 by jerryking
Glen William Greenhouses Ltd
. The three producers each grew the same three varieties of lettuce: boston bibb accounting roughly 60% of total production, green leaf 25%, and read leaf 15%. These varieties were considered specialty lettuce.

Second, the producers sold their lettuce directly to large retail stores and restaurants in their areas of operation. The sellers were responsible for delivery of the lettuce to the individual stores. Urban centres seemed to be the areas where hydroponic lettuce of these varieties were sold. The chain stores, like IGA and Sobey's, were the retailers of choice for the growers.

Third, the producers did not now use, nor would they use, wholesalers to sell their lettuce. The principal reason for this was handling problems. The growers did not believe that the wholesalers would take proper care in handling the lettuce and, therefore, retailers would either not buy it, or would only pay a reduced price.

A second reason for not using wholesalers was the growers' concern about losing contact with the retailer, more specifically, the produce manger. The growers felt that contact had to be maintained in order to ensure that retailers carried the product and continued to handle it correctly A third reason for by- passing wholesalers was the 20 percent margin required by the wholesaler. From the grower's perspective, the wholesaler was not worth this cost.

Fourth, each of the growers packaged their lettuce in a similar manner.
agribusiness  greenhouses  market_research  salads  fresh_produce  statistics  case_studies 
april 2013 by jerryking
Big Help for Small Businesses at the Library - WSJ.com
August 29, 2006 | WSJ | By TARA SIEGEL BERNARD.

Big Help for Small Businesses At the Library
Commercial Databases, Assistance on Research And Classes Are Offered
small_business  market_research  business_planning  start_ups 
january 2013 by jerryking
Top 10 Business Plan Mistakes
March 15-21st, 2006 | Entrepreneur.com | Andrew Clarke.

1. The plan is poorly written.
2. The plan presentation is sloppy.
3. The plan is incomplete.
4. The plan is too vague.
5. The plan is too detailed.
6. The plan makes unfounded or unrealistic assumptions.
7. The plan includes inadequate research.
8. You claim there's no risk involved in your new venture.
9. You claim you have no competition.
10. The business plan is really no plan at all.
problems  business_planning  assumptions  market_research  competition  risk-assessment 
december 2012 by jerryking
Picking the competition's brains for deal insight
September 2002 | Mergers and Acquisitions | Thomas E. Austin.

Focuses on the use of market research for acquisitions and mergers in the U.S. Types of market due diligence studies; Approaches for conducting market due diligence; Tips in interviewing competitors.
competitive_intelligence  due_diligence  interviews  M&A  market_research  mergers_&_acquisitions  tips 
september 2012 by jerryking
Mr. Gates Queries His Peers - WSJ.com
November 9, 2007 | WSJ |ROBERT FRANK
Mr. Gates Queries His Peers
To Boost Giving, Foundation Backs Survey of Wealthiest
(1) The study, called The Joys and Dilemmas of Wealth and scheduled for release next fall,
(2) Paul Schervish, director of Boston College's Center on Wealth and Philanthropy.
(3) Wealth-management firms, luxury-product companies, magazines and car makers, as well as specialized research firms like Connecticut-based Prince & Associates and Chicago-based Spectrem Group, are all increasing their research to better understand the richest Americans.
(4) CCC Alliance, a Boston-based collective of families worth $100 million or more. It has also linked up with several philanthropy groups, such as the Wealth and Giving Forum.
billgates  high_net_worth  foundations  surveys  philanthropy  market_research  luxury  family_office 
august 2012 by jerryking
Facebook, Twitter and Foursquare as Corporate Focus Groups - NYTimes.com
By STEPHANIE CLIFFORD
Published: July 30, 2012

Companies like Wal-Mart and Samuel Adams are turning social media sites like Facebook, Twitter and Foursquare into extensions of market research departments. And companies are just beginning to figure out how to use the enormous amount of information available.... “There’s mountains and mountains of data being created in social media,” said Ravi Raj, vice president for products for @WalmartLabs, adding that the company used the data to decide what merchandise to carry where.

In one of its first analyses, performed last summer, @WalmartLabs found that cake pops — small bites of cake on lollipop sticks — were becoming popular. “Starbucks had just started getting them in their cafes, and people were talking a lot about it,” Mr. Raj said.

His team alerted merchants at Wal-Mart headquarters. The merchants had also heard about the product, and decided to carry cake-pop makers in Walmart stores. They were popular enough that the company plans to bring them back this holiday season.
Frito_Lay  Wal-Mart  market_research  social_media  focus_groups  data  merchandising  business_development  data_driven  Starbucks 
august 2012 by jerryking
The search for dark secrets - FT.com
November 28, 2005 | Financial Times | By Jeremy Grant

With the premium end of the US chocolate market growing at an annual compound rate of 15 per cent compared with 3 to 4 per cent for standard chocolate, Mars believes there is scope to sell high-quality chocolates in a café setting to a target group of relatively affluent people aged from 25 to 39.

Focus group work, and the number of young mothers visiting the Chicago stores with prams and strollers, tells Mars that most will be women. It is perhaps no coincidence that the name Ethel – that of the wife of Mars company founder and inventor of the Milky Way, Frank Mars – was chosen.
CAGR  cafés  chocolate  confectionery_industry  CPG  experimentation  gourmands  gourmet  high-end  high-growth  high-quality  market_research  Mars  niches  retailers  Starbucks  upscale  women 
july 2012 by jerryking
Bubbling Up
January 2005 | Worth | Sergio Zyman.

We changed the formula we had been using for 100 years to give our customers what we thought they wanted: New Coke. We orchestrated a huge launch, received abundant media coverage and were delighted with ourselves until the sales figures rolled in. Within weeks. we realized that we had blundered. Sales tanked and the media turned against us. Seventy-seven days New Coke was born. We made the second-hardest decision in company history: We pulled the plug. What went wrong? The answer was embarrassingly simple: We did not know enough about our customers. We did not even know what motivated them to buy Coke in the first place. Based on that, we fell into the trap of imagining that innovation—abandoning our existing product for a new one would cure our ills. After the debacle, we reached out to consumers, and found that they wanted more than taste when they made purchase. Drinking Coke enabled them to tap into the Coca-Cola experience, to be part of Coke's history and to feel the continuity and stability of the brand. Instead of innovating. we should have renovated. Instead of making a product and hoping people would buy it, we should have asked customers what they wanted and given it to them. As soon as we started listening to them, consumers respondcd, increasing our sales 9 billion to 15 billion cases a year.
Coca-Cola  Pepsi  market_research  marketing  renovations  growth  CMOs  product_launches  kill_rates  brands  customer_expectations  customer_insights  culling  mistakes  beverages  innovation  contra-innovation 
may 2012 by jerryking
Finding Info on a Unique Business - WSJ.com
June 6, 2006 | WSJ | Kelly Spors. When the Business You Want To Buy Is Hard to Find.

Many business buyers now search for acquisition opportunities online, but it does little good when seeking a rather unique business....Telephone everyone you can, mention the type of business you're seeking and ask whom they know who might be looking to sell. Even if they can't think of anyone, they may put you in touch with someone who can.
Kelly_K._Spors  buying_a_business  due_diligence  market_research  one-of-a-kind  uniqueness  hard_to_find 
may 2012 by jerryking
Five reasons to look at an industry magazine
March 24, 2011 | Teresa

Now why would you want to look at a magazine in print, when so many are available in either databases or have websites with current content? Here are 5 reasons (in no particular order)

Advertisements - many publications have business to business opportunities or job ads that you will not see in other sources.
Directory issues - most of these magazines offer an annual directory that lists company specialties and contact information. Many times the company breakdowns are more specific than in more traditional directories such as Scotts or Canadian Trade Index. Expensive to purchase separately, they are usually included in a print subscription.
Forecasts - want to be ahead of the game? The first or last issue of the year many times has predictions of where the industry will be going in the coming year.
Trends - want to track a particular wave of interest in a certain product or see what the next big thing might be? Or what was popular 5 years ago? Leaf through an issue.
Charts and illustrations - unless the article appears as a PDF in a database or online on the website, you will miss out on what are vital pieces of information complementing an article.
industries  market_research  libraries  tips  blogs 
april 2012 by jerryking
Researcher's Data Rewrote Hollywood Endings - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 9, 2011 | WSJ | By STEPHEN MILLER.

Researcher's Data Rewrote Hollywood Endings
obituaries  market_research  movies  films  data 
january 2012 by jerryking
Nicholas Carr on E-Books - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 31, 2011 |WSJ | By NICHOLAS CARR

Books That Are Never Done Being Written
Digital text is ushering in an era of perpetual revision and updating, for better and for worse.

As electronic books push paper ones aside, movable type seems fated to be replaced by movable text.

That's an attractive development in many ways. It makes it easy for writers to correct errors and update facts. Guidebooks will no longer send travelers to restaurants that have closed or to once charming inns that have turned into fleabags. The instructions in manuals will always be accurate. Reference books need never go out of date.

Even literary authors will be tempted to keep their works fresh. Historians and biographers will be able to revise their narratives to account for recent events or newly discovered documents. Polemicists will be able to bolster their arguments with new evidence. Novelists will be able to scrub away the little anachronisms that can make even a recently published story feel dated.

But as is often the case with digitization, the boon carries a bane. The ability to alter the contents of a book will be easy to abuse. School boards may come to exert even greater influence over what students read. They'll be able to edit textbooks that don't fit with local biases. Authoritarian governments will be able to tweak books to suit their political interests. And the edits can ripple backward. Because e-readers connect to the Internet, the works they contain can be revised remotely, just as software programs are updated today. Movable text makes a lousy preservative.

Such abuses can be prevented through laws and software protocols. What may be more insidious is the pressure to fiddle with books for commercial reasons. Because e-readers gather enormously detailed information on the way people read, publishers may soon be awash in market research. They'll know how quickly readers progress through different chapters, when they skip pages, and when they abandon a book.
Nicholas_Carr  e-books  digital_media  shortcomings  protocols  unintended_consequences  abuses  digitalization  market_research  publishing  dark_side 
january 2012 by jerryking
Search Results
Search Results
(312 reports)
Keywords: Web Development
Published: Last 2 Years
Region: All Regions
Category: All Categories > Technology & Media > Software & Enterprise Computing
webdesign  tools  market_research 
december 2011 by jerryking
Market Research: Safety Not Always in Numbers | Qualtrics
Author: Qualtrics|July 28, 2010

Albert Einstein once said, “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.”

Although many market research experts would say that quantitative research is the safest bet when one has limited resources, it can be dangerous to assume that it is always the best option.

we put together a few guidelines for when one research method might be more useful than the other.

Quantitative:
* For trending purposes, i.e. trends in customer feedback
* Need for quick feedback
* Particularly useful when a company wants to determine how to increase market share
* Product feedback for consumer products

Qualitative:
* Help identify non-obvious ways to delight current customers
* Looking for information to grow an existing market or create a new one
* Market research follow-up questions when numeric scales can be misleading
* Messaging validation for products that are new to the market
* Market validation
* Understanding objections and barriers
* Product feedback for enterprise products

In the article, “Market Research: Quantitative or Qualitative,” the writer Diane Hagglund said, “sometimes numbers provide false confidence and obscure real opportunity.” [Definition of overquantification]

She later added in a follow-up article that her market research firm recommends web surveys as good vehicles for quantifying concepts that the researcher is familiar with and wants accurate percentages for each option.

“This is a valuable thing to do, especially for market sizing, external marketing and PR purpose,” Hagglund said. “But for finding out the answers that you don’t really know, start with qualitative research – and by all means do a web survey next to put those percentages in place once you know the statements to put the percentages with.”

In other words, it’s important to quantify your qualitative research and qualify your quantitative research
market_research  market_sizing  overquantification  storytelling  qualitative  quantitative  Scott_Anthony  dangers  research_methods  non-obvious  enterprise_clients  false_confidence  Albert_Einstein  easy-to-measure  delighting_customers  follow-up_questions 
december 2011 by jerryking
Market Segmentation
Jim, I believe you can best help your sister in her market segmentation challenge by taking a hard look at the behavioural approach to market research popularized by folks like Clayton Christensen, and his disciples, Mike Raynor at Deloitte Research and Scott Anthony at Innosight. Here is the short introduction to the approach (http://www.forbes.com/forbes/2003/1013/082_print.html). The slightly longer, but more detailed version can easily be found online in the Spring 2007 MIT Sloan Management Review article, “ Finding the Right Job For Your Product”. Once you’re on top of it, you might share it with your sister as she thinks about the print market in Halifax.

The course you’re contemplating recommending, segmenting by target attributes (i.e. using D&B data and looking at size of company), seems straightforward and easy but that’s because that’s the data--the only data--to which you readily have access. The danger of recommending this traditional approach to segmentation is that if your sister pursues it, it will surely lead her into to zero-sum competition with other print & ad agencies in the Halifax. She will be hard-pressed to find sustainable new opportunities this way.
market_segmentation  market_research  marketing  Michael_Raynor  Clayton_Christensen  advice 
november 2011 by jerryking
In a Shift, Marketers Beef Up Ad Spending Inside Stores - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 21, 2005 | WSJ | By EMILY NELSON and SARAH
ELLISON....Some stores charge marketers a fee for in-store displays --
as if they were selling space on a roadside billboard. Others don't have
the clout or think they will be compensated through the overall boost
to sales. Those that charge face another wrinkle: there's no standard
system for measuring the audience for in-store ads and therefore no easy
way to charge for the space. The fees for each project are negotiated
on a case-by-case basis, a time-consuming task.

Ideas for Asif and LBMA as well as Turnstyle. Help stores monetize their 3rd party in-store advertising opportunities.
digital_signage  P&G  marketing  in-store  advertising_agencies  market_research  LBMA 
august 2011 by jerryking
A Shout-Out for Segmentation Data - BusinessWeek
March 15, 2011, BusinessWeek By G. Michael Maddock and
Raphael Louis Vitón .Quit yawning and start seizing on the wealth
within segmentation data. Every department should demand to see this
information. a simple, three-part formula:

Step 1. Define success. Get as specific as possible. Step 2. Define the
characteristics you want your segment to have. Step 3. "Simply" find
what predicts/correlates with these variables.

Having decided whom you want to go after, find the variables that will
lead you to these people. Asking Lots of Questions

Having identified this market, you go out and ask the potential
customers within it as many questions as you can think of—how much they
weigh, what snacks they eat, whether they have kids or a pet. Then you
sort through the data and look for commonalities (Step 3).
segmentation  market_segmentation  market_research  questions  JCK  sorting  correlations  predictive_analytics  ethnography  think_threes 
march 2011 by jerryking
Up, up and away; Pop-ups
Nov 6, 2010 | The Economist | Independent galleries, theatres,
bars (not always licensed) & front-room restaurants, all with
intentionally short lifespans, have been popping up suddenly, often
overnight, in the hipper parts of British cities for several yrs. The
exigencies of the recession encouraged retailers to emulate them: the
previous govt. set up a £ 3m fund to fill empty shops; landlords became
willing to sign short-term leases. Last yr. the people behind an
ice-cream brand named The Icecreamists ran a pop-up shop, complete with
in-house band & catwalk shows, inside Selfridges in London.The
brand's slogan-- to "liberate the world one lick at a time"--wouldn't be
out of place at Banner repeater. Founder Matt O'Connor says his 1st
pop-up let him launch his brand for a 1/10th of the normal cost, while
testing product ideas. For established brands, the format provides a
direct way of interacting with customers, turning each day's trading
into a consumer focus group.
ProQuest  marketing  trends  United_Kingdom  branding  market_research  product_launches  focus  retailers  experimentation  pop-ups  ice_cream 
november 2010 by jerryking
KKR Evolves, Hiring Trading Team From Goldman - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 21, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By GREGORY
ZUCKERMAN Evolution at KKR: Goldman's Genetics, The move KKR. to hire a
team of stock traders from Goldman Sachs is a sign of change sweeping
the private-equity industry. Prestigious buyout firms are plunging into
stock & bond trading, underwriting, & hedge funds, and away from
the LBOs that earned them fame and fortune. As recently as 2004, $14.4
B of KKR's $15.1 B of assets came from leveraged buyouts. Today, after
diving into debt trading, only $41B of its $54.4 B portfolio is from LBO
investments. And KKR, whose stock now trades publicly as KKR & Co.,
is actively examining a push into other businesses, according to people
close to the matter....Top executives at KKR and other firms argue that
in their research on buyout deals they uncover other investing
opportunities, such possible debt and stock purchases, that they can't
profit from without operating other kinds of investment vehicles.
diversification  private_equity  KKR  markets  buyouts  market_research  leverage  stocks  carve_outs 
october 2010 by jerryking
Mavericks help to break new ground: MARKETING: A 'Super Group' is not just another focus group.
Dec 13, 2002. | Financial Times.pg. 15 | AliciaClegg. Its
consumers do more than evaluate ideas - they come up with them, writes
Alicia Clegg; [London edition]
research_methods  market_research  ProQuest  branding 
june 2010 by jerryking
Video kills the focus group
Nov 4, 2003. | Financial Times. London (UK): pg. 6 | ANDY
NAIRN. Media-literate consumers are more likely to express their views
to a video camera than to a bunch of strangers;
ProQuest  research_methods  market_research  branding  focus_groups 
june 2010 by jerryking
Why focus groups tell you the obvious
Mar 24, 2010. | Financial Times. pg. 14 | Luke Johnson. Great
breakthroughs in fields such as new product development are frequently
achieved by avoiding surveys and committees altogether. Constant testing
can lead to blandness and safety-first choices. In creative affairs,
corporate brainstorming sessions usually end up with groupthink
dullness, all originality squeezed out because of the fear of failure or
through the influence of office politics. As Steve Jobs said: "It's
really hard to design products by focus groups. A lot of times, people
don't know what they want until you show it to them."
ProQuest  Luke_Johnson  research_methods  product_development  surveys  market_research  breakthroughs  moonshots  Steve_Jobs  unarticulated_desires 
april 2010 by jerryking
Get smart: scooping the competition in six easy steps—without breaking the law | Managing | Strategy | Canadian Business Online
December 27, 2004 | From Canadian Business Online |
Gathering competitive intelligence is all too often confused with
corporate espionage, but practitioners say it really has nothing to do
with planting a mole inside your competitor's HQ or hacking into a
computer system. After all, that's against the law. Still, there are
perfectly legal, ethical and effective ways to find out what your
competitors are doing.
competitive_intelligence  scuttlebutt  due_diligence  market_research  sleuthing  moles 
february 2010 by jerryking
Innovation guru urges Ottawa on
Mar 29, 2004 | The Globe and Mail | by Simon Tuck.
Clayton Christensen, an innovation guru who teaches business
administration at Harvard University, told government officials that new
technologies and an open mind to the delivery of services can -- and
probably will -- help Canada reconcile its dilemma of escalating public
sector costs, combined with a determination to maintain services. too
many companies view their competitors as the other key players in their
sectors, instead of other products that compete to do the same job for
the customer. Research In Motion Ltd.'s BlackBerry, for example, may
compete more for the business traveller's spare time with newspapers,
magazines, and CNN's airport news than with other handheld device makers
such as Palm Inc. Poor market research contributes heavily to the fact
that about 75 per cent of new products fail, he said.
Clayton_Christensen  disruption  innovation  GoC  Canadian  government  market_research  ProQuest  Ottawa  open_mind  gurus 
january 2010 by jerryking
Switch to the low-income customer
14-Nov-2005 | Financial Times | By Jeremy Grant. "When AG
Lafley came in [in 2000] and said, 'We're going to serve the world's
consumers', that led us to say, 'We don't have the product strategy, the
cost structure, to be effective in serving lower income consumers'.
"What's happened in the last five years has been one of the most
dramatic transformations I've seen in my career. We now have all of our
functions focused on that," says Mr Daley. P&G, the world's largest
consumer goods company, devotes about 30 %of its $1.9bn in annual
research and development spending to low-income markets, a 50 % increase
from 5 yrs. ago. Consumer research: spend time in consumers' homes to
gain insights into daily habits; Cost innovation: use proprietary
technology to design low-income products; Innovation productivity: use
"matchmakers" such as InnoCentive; Manufacturing efficiency: cut mfg.
costs by developing a network of suppliers in China, Brazil, Vietnam and
India.
P&G  BRIC  market_research  consumer_research  primary_field_research  customer_insights  innovation  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  A.G._Lafley  InnoCentive  supply_chains  China  Brazil  Vietnam  India  observations  insights  cost-structure  jugaad  proprietary  behavioural  cost-cutting  match-making  CPG  low-income 
december 2009 by jerryking
Marketers Pursue the Shallow-Pocketed - WSJ.com
Jan. 26, 2007 | WSJ | By ANTONIO REGALADO. Interpublic Group's
McCann World Group in 2005 polled 15 of its major advertising clients.
These clients saw their biggest mktg. opportunities as being people
with low incomes....In recent years, mktg. to the poor has become a hot
subject. Univ. of Michigan economist C.K. Prahalad helped popularize the
idea with his 2004 book "The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid,"
which argued big companies could profit and help the world's 4 billion
poor or low-income people by finding innovative ways to sell them soap
and refrigerators....Some companies have already been tackling
low-income mkts. by revamping distribution sys., or tweaking products so
that they are simpler or less expensive. E.g., Nestlé Brazil saw sales
of its Bono cookies jump 40% last year after it shrank the package to
140 g. from 200 g. and dropped the price... Illiteracy is one big
challenge...The strong role that community plays in poor neighborhoods
is of particular interest.
advertising_agencies  C.K._Prahalad  marketing  market_research  BRIC  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  low-income 
december 2009 by jerryking
How to Brand Sand
April 1, 1998 | Strategy + Business Issue 11 | by Sam I.
Hill, Jack McGrath, and Sandeep Dayal. In commodity-goods markets,
price is usually the only differentiator. But if you can brand those
goods and bundle them with services, even bricks and sand can command
premium prices. Here is how to turn commodities into branded goods.
howto  branding  commodities  commoditization  market_research  market_segmentation  differentiation  bundling 
october 2009 by jerryking
Finding competitive intelligence on Internet start-up companies: a study of secondary resource use and information-seeking processes
October 2001| Information Research, Vol. 7 No. 1 | by Sanda
Erdelez, School of Information Science and Learning Technologies,
University of Missouri-Columbia and Nicole Ware, Graduate School of
Library and Information Science,
University of Texas at Austin.
competitive_intelligence  start_ups  market_research  sleuthing  due_diligence  scuttlebutt  secondary_research 
october 2009 by jerryking
ScienceDirect - Journal of Business Venturing : Penurious strategies for parsimonious research: “Little guy” alternatives for “big-buck” research*1
Entrepreneurship research is in a transition stage. New research and policy vistas have been opened up by the very recent emergence of big-science, "big-buck" databases. In the past 12 months, physics had 2 remarkable jolts: 1. The federal government made an unprecedented financial and technological commitment to develop the superconducting supercollider in Texas. 2. Chemists Pons and Fleischmann reported creating cold fusion in a low-cost experiment. In entrepreneurship research, large nonrepresentative samples generally are samples of convenience, drawn from trade or industry groups, because they were readily available to the researcher. These data can suffer from self-selection. The guiding principle for penurious strategizing in entrepreneurship research is to explicitly consider quality in the design of research. Two beliefs regarding this principle are: 1. It is possible to do high-quality work by building on the high-quality works of others. 2. There are questions of tremendous significance that can be addressed by low-cost research methods.
high-quality  low-cost  market_research  parsimony  penny-pinching  research_methods  small_business  strategies 
june 2009 by jerryking
What Does Your Credit-Card Company Know About You? - NYTimes.com
May 12, 2009 | New York Times | By CHARLES DUHIGG. Credit card
companies are focusing on those customers most likely to honor their
debts. Credit-card companies are investing more in understanding their
customers’ lives and psyches, because they believe knowing what makes
cardholders tick will help firms differentiate those who are good risks
from those who should be weeded out.
analytics  competingonanalytics  psychology  data  data_driven  credit_cards  credit_scoring  human_psyche  market_research 
may 2009 by jerryking
WPP, Google to Fund Web-Ad Research - WSJ.com
MARCH 18, 2009| WSJ| by EMILY STEEL

The two companies are teaming with institutions including HBS, Sloan and
Stanford University to fund & research: (1) how ads in traditional
and digital media work together to influence consumer choices; (2)
psychology and neuroscience to analyze how the brain determines whether
Web ads are relevant; and (3), how Chinese Internet users respond to
different online-ad formats, such as display and search ads.
Emily_Steel  Google  digital_media  market_research  cross-cultural  China  online_advertising  neurosciences  WPP  consumer_research  digital_influencers 
march 2009 by jerryking
Virtual reality takes shoppers to another world | The Australian
October 19, 2006, The Australian, article by Alan Mitchell on how Procter & Gamble has stolen a march in the brands battle.
marketing  tools  innovation  market_research  virtual_reality  P&G  retailers  simulations 
march 2009 by jerryking
Stock Sleuthing 101: Talk to the company's customers
June 30, 2007 column by AVNER MANDELMAN counseling investors to
avoid fixating on the numerical side of the analysis to the detriment
of talking to a company's customers to understand truly the business'
strength or franchise.
stocks  Avner_Mandelman  market_research  sleuthing  personal_knowledge  scuttlebutt  due_diligence  biases  stockmarkets  primary_field_research 
january 2009 by jerryking
The New Focus Groups: Online Networks - WSJ.com
Jan. 14, 2008 WSJ article by Emily Steel on how online communities are being cultivated as tools for consumer market research.
market_research  consumer_research  Web_2.0  social_networking  product_development 
january 2009 by jerryking

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