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jerryking : market_segmentation   48

When Big Data Isn’t an Option
May 19, 2014 / Summer 2014 / Strategy + Business | by David Meer
When Big Data Isn’t an Option
Companies that only have access to “little data” can still use that information to improve their business.

Many companies—probably most—work in relatively sparse data environments, without access to the abundant information needed for advanced analytics and data mining. For instance, point-of-sale register data is not standard in emerging markets. In most B2B industries, companies have access to their own sales and shipment data but have little visibility into overall market volumes or what their competitors are selling. Highly specialized or concentrated markets, such as parts suppliers to automakers, have only a handful of potential customers. These companies have to be content with what might be called little data—readily available information that companies can use to generate insights, even if it is sparse or of uneven quality....the beverage manufacturer developed an algorithm based on observable characteristics, then asked its sales professionals to classify all the bars and restaurants in their territories based on the algorithm. (This is a classic little data technique: filling in the data gaps internally.)

. Little data techniques, therefore, can include just about any method that gives a company more insight into its customers without breaking the bank. As the examples above illustrate, mining little data doesn’t mean investing in expensive data acquisition, hardware, software, or technology infrastructure. Rather, companies need three things:

• The commitment to become more fact-based in their decision making.

• The willingness to learn by doing.

• A bit of creativity. ...

The bottom line: Companies have to put in the extra effort required to capture and interpret data that is already being generated.
small_data  data  analytics  data_driven  market_segmentation  observations  call_centres  insights  data_quality  data_capture  interpretation  point-of-sale  mindsets  creativity 
september 2015 by jerryking
Spotify Wants Listeners to Break Down Music Barriers - NYTimes.com
JUNE 3, 2015 | NYT | Farhad Manjoo

Spotify, which has just introduced a new version of its app, says that because online streaming services let us call up and listen to anything we like, and because its curated playlists push us toward new stuff, we are all increasingly escaping rigid genres....Spotify itself has about 60 million active users, 15 million of whom pay $10 per month for an ad-free premium version. On average, the company said, the service exposes each of these listeners to one new artist every day. That is making listeners less beholden to music of certain styles and eras. Instead, many of us will try anything, just because we can easily sample it online.

Spotify is betting that fixed musical genres will fade away. In its new version rolling out to iPhone users, the company has expanded its effort to program for moods and activities rather than merely certain kinds of musical tastes.
Spotify  streaming  music  market_segmentation  playlists  curation  Farhad_Manjoo 
june 2015 by jerryking
Why Small Businesses Are Starting to Win Again - The New Yorker
JANUARY 24, 2015
Small Is Bountiful
BY TIM WU

Farmers who sell, say, organic or free-range foods, cannot hope to compete based on price. Instead, they try to create consumers who won’t eat chicken produced by big companies for moral, health, or aesthetic reasons...The true-differentiation strategy seems to work best when scale, despite its efficiencies, also introduces blind spots in areas such as customer service, flavor, curation, or other intangibles not entirely consistent with mass production and standardization. Where getting big begins to hurt the product, small can be bountiful.

=====================================
it is a two-part problem. No. 1, the consumer and competitive marketplace is definitely shifting. For example, quality has evolved beyond just good ingredients, preparation and packaging. Basic quality is a given now; many consumers are looking for something extra: less mass-produced, natural, local.

No. 2, iconic food companies and their mature brands are not responding effectively. Large, established food companies and their brands are being managed as portfolios of revenue and profit streams with a short-term financial orientation, and not as companies that produce food products. Small companies, on the other hand, are being created and managed by people with a food orientation and passion.
small_business  size  scaling  Tim_Wu  Peter_Drucker  portfolio_management  Gulliver_strategies  differentiation  trends  breweries  beers  craftsmanship  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  revenge_effects  blind_spots  personal_values  market_segmentation  mass_production  decreasing_returns_to_scale  aesthetics  eco-friendly  creating_demand  food  foodies  gourmet  large_companies 
january 2015 by jerryking
Securable Market | Strategyn
In all the traditional market definitions, the size of a market hinges on the number of buyers who might exist for a particular market offer. But we know that market offers (i.e., products) are merely point-in-time solutions that help customers get jobs done. The jobs customers are trying to get done do not change over time. They are stable.

In contrast to traditional methods based on products and price, Strategyn uses jobs, outcomes, and the opportunity algorithm to calculate the size of a market opportunity and the market share that can be captured by a new solution. Strategyn calls the resulting number the securable market to distinguish it from traditional addressable market definitions and to highlight that it is calculated with different inputs.
market_sizing  market_segmentation  Theodore_Levitt  disruption  customer_experience  differentiation  new_categories  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  market_opportunities 
november 2014 by jerryking
Fighting fires with data: How killing the long-form census hurt community planning - The Globe and Mail
JOE FRIESEN - DEMOGRAPHICS REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, May. 14 2014

Most people use the company’s data in conjunction with a mapping tool and segmentation analysis, which sorts the population into lifestyle categories such as “Middleburg Managers” and “Young Digerati,” to better understand their habits and tastes. A library, for example, found that despite having a large population of senior citizens, programs advertised to “seniors” were a bust. Having looked more closely at their income and lifestyle data, they targeted the same group as “mature adults” and had much more success.

“Often, the real power is in the melding of the data. They know things about their users, but not their neighbourhood, then they marry them,” said Doug Norris, chief demographer at Environics Analytics.

Robert Dalgleish, an executive director at the United Church of Canada, is eagerly awaiting new data sorted down to the DA level. He said more than 500 local congregations in the church use this kind of data to better understand the areas they inhabit. One puzz-ling finding was that for every identified member of the United Church in a congregation, there are nine others living within a few kilometres who never attend a service.

“The data doesn’t give us answers, but it gives us really good questions,” Mr. Dalgleish said. “It really allows congregations to drill down into their communities.”
Joe_Friesen  demographic_changes  data  mapping  local  data_melding  neighbourhoods  market_segmentation  analytics  churches  Statistics_Canada  firefighting  Environs  customer_segmentation 
june 2014 by jerryking
Using CRM Data to Segment Customers: How It Helps Sell More
April 2014 | Inside CRM |David Gillman.

Classifying the prospects is more difficult. Automated systems help. With many characteristics of current customers in the CRM database, statistical processes run over the customer master file to find key characteristics of customers in each group. Those characteristics are then back-applied to the prospect list. Some common differentiating fields might be company size, number of contacts, age of the first record, location, and source of the lead, and similar data fields that may be common in the CRM database.
CRM  market_segmentation  howto  data  customer_segmentation 
may 2014 by jerryking
The Four Best (and Worst) Uses of Market Research| Page 2
April 9 2013 | | ChiefExecutive.net | Chief Executive Magazine | by Taddy Hall

Experience and research suggest that CEOs of many companies look for growth in the wrong places and in the wrong ways, thereby missing opportunities and leaving them for the newbies. In a sense, though, this is good news: success lies in doing things differently, not spending more.

Specifically, there are four approaches organizations often take, none of which reliably lead to the actionable insights business leaders need:

Seek and profile large, growing and profitable markets
Solicit feedback from current best customers
Segment markets based on customer attributes, such as demographics, or based on product characteristics like “high end” vs. “low end,” “regular” vs. “light,” etc.
Benchmark progress against competitors

In each case, it is easy to see why an industry leader might have interest in the findings; however, these outputs speak primarily to aspects of the existing business or to the franchises of other established players. In other words, mapping current demand reveals little to nothing of the less-visible latent demand that is essential fuel for transformational innovation. As Henry Ford mused a hundred years ago: if he’d asked folks what they wanted, they would have asked for faster horses. Echoing Ford, Steve Jobs noted that consumers can’t describe what they’ve never experienced.
market_research  disruption  Clayton_Christensen  high-end  latent  insights  growth  opportunities  transformational  customer_insights  innovation  large_markets  market_segmentation  customer_risk  actionable_information  hidden  Henry_Ford  Steve_Jobs  market_share  static  dynamic  segmentation  missed_opportunities  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  unarticulated_desires 
april 2013 by jerryking
Nielsen sees falling share of fresh at grocery stores
03/13/2013 | The Packer | Tom Karst.

By 2016, the report predicts U.S. retail fresh dollar market share for supercenters/hypermarkets will climb to 15%, up 1% from 2012. The share of fresh sales at U.S. warehouse clubs will rise to 12% by 2016, up 2% from 2012. In contrast, the share of fresh sales at U.S. supermarkets will decline from 66% in 2012 to 64% by 2016.

“Fresh as a commodity market is changing and can no longer just rely on strategies that are determined by supply and commodity prices,” Bruce Axtman, president of Nielsen Perishables Group, Chicago, said in the report. “Suppliers and retailers are slowly but surely transitioning to the consumer-packaged goods style of category management based on the knowledge of both consumer and performance data to better understand how various consumer groups purchase fresh foods differently, at which stores, and at what price points.”
grocery  Nielsen  supermarkets  fresh_produce  category_management  perishables  market_segmentation 
april 2013 by jerryking
Marketers develop a taste for aspiring foodies
Dec. 27 2012 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER.

Loblaw's President’s Choice Black Label Collection targets a growing consumer population: foodies.

The Black Label products launched late last year, but in limited distribution at first in select parts of Ontario. With the nationwide rollout now complete, there has been a bigger push to advertise the products this holiday season.
marketing  grocery  Loblaws  private_labels  brands  branding  gourmands  gourmet  food  foodies  market_segmentation  product_launches  rollouts 
december 2012 by jerryking
Competitive Analysis for Competitive Advantage
(Charles Waud & WaudWare)
Who are my relevant competitors?
What are the criteria to determine customer value creation?
What are the priorities for competition?
Compared to the leading competitors, how do we look on each criterion?
On which criteria are we better?
On which criteria are they better?
How can we better position ourselves on our "strong" criteria?
How can we improve the customer's perception of our "weak" criteria?
Where should we allocate resources?
Where will future changes come from in my competitor's strategies?
On what key customer "value criteria" will they change?
How can we anticipate these changes and "reposition" our strategy most effectively?
Ivey  frameworks  competitive_advantage  market_segmentation  Five_Forces_model  value_chains  competitive_strategy  strategy  products  product_strategy  competitive_intelligence  experiece_curves  cost_analysis  comparative_advantage  customer_segmentation 
december 2012 by jerryking
Consumer Segments in Urban and Suburban Farmers Markets
Volume 13, Issue 2, 2010| International Food and Agribusiness Management Review | by Gabriel Elepua and Michael A. Mazzoccob
farmers'_markets  market_segmentation  agriculture  agribusiness  urban  suburban  customer_segmentation 
october 2012 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: States rights
posted by Seth Godin on November 02, 2007

Don't treat everyone the same. First time visitors want something different than repeaters. Loyal customers want to see something different from the masses.

Get your IT person to show you how to divide the world into states. Then start from scratch and make a different experience for everyone.
websites  market_segmentation  Seth_Godin  customer_loyalty  tips  customer_experience  IT  UX  first_time_visitors  repeat_visitors 
september 2012 by jerryking
Winning in Wireless
MAY 1998 | McKinsey Quarterly | SCOTT ARNOLD, BYRON G. AUGUSTE, MARK KNICKREHM, AND PAUL J. ROCHE.

Can the industry learn to operate at one-third its current price levels? Companies will need to build businesses around key segments. The challenge: reducing churn among the customers who provide most of your profits.
mobile_phones  wireless  McKinsey  strategy  market_segmentation  customer_churn 
august 2012 by jerryking
Segmentation - Back to School: Connecting With College Students :
September 28, 2004 | Marketing Profs | by Robert F. Hogeboom |

here are seven strategies that reflect the unique culture of college students:

Communicate lifestyle, not age relevance: Speaking to college students' age ("You're in college, obtain your first credit card") is ineffective, because it does not inspire them or grab their attention. Marketers must create a link between their brand and students' lifestyle, which includes attending concerts and movies, snowboarding on weekends, eating at off-campus restaurants, traveling and more. Remember: college students don't just study and attend class all day—they are extremely active.

Attach your brand name to current trends: Snowboarding, surfing, skateboarding, underground rock bands, rock concert festivals and the ESPN XGames are considered "cool" among the college student market. Businesses can attach their brand name to these activities, events, products and associations that have earned "street-cred" among the student market, and thus share in their emotional appeal.

Tap into students' emotional needs for empowerment, privilege, and status: College students are attracted to goods and services that empower them as consumers and individuals. Examples include the Internet, mobile phones, MP3 players, online file sharing and credit cards. Additionally, products and services that enhance social status are successful at winning students over.

Don't try too hard to win students over: College students greet most product claims with skepticism. Students are aware that they are a highly desirable market. They don't want to be overtly sold or pitched. Instead, they simply want to be educated about products and services and told how the offering matches their unique needs.

Reach students at key transitional periods: At certain transitional periods, college students exhibit a need for certain products and services. It's a marketer's job to reach students at these points of need. Key transitional periods for college students include the beginning of freshman year, summer breaks, moving to off-campus living, studying abroad and graduation.

Become an authentic brand: Ad-weary and marketing-savvy college students value authentic brands. Authentic brands exhibit the following characteristics:

• They develop trust among potential customers—trust is the foundation of brand authenticity.

• They are perceived as not trying too hard to sell or actively win customers over.

• They continually deliver value and convince students that they have students' best interests at heart.

Play-it-straight: College students immediately sense hype and do not accept brands that they consider fake.

Read more: http://www.marketingprofs.com/4/hogeboom1.asp#ixzz203iwNgRt
market_segmentation  Colleges_&_Universities  students  lifestyles  branding  leisure  marketing  tips  target_marketing  authenticity  transitions 
july 2012 by jerryking
You Are What You Eat
October 01, 2000 | American Demographics - Advertising Age |By: David J. Lipke
market_segmentation  Colleges_&_Universities  surveys  lifestyles  Sodexho  foodservice 
july 2012 by jerryking
How You Slice It Smarter Segmentation for Your Sales Force
March 2004 | HBR | by Ernest Waaser, Marshall Dahneke,Michael Pekkarinen, and Michael Weissel.

Medical-equipment supplier Hill-Rom accelerated its growth by segmenting customers in a new way and tackling their most pressing problems.
market_segmentation  HBR  medical_devices  sales_teams  customer_segmentation 
july 2012 by jerryking
Market Segmentation
Jim, I believe you can best help your sister in her market segmentation challenge by taking a hard look at the behavioural approach to market research popularized by folks like Clayton Christensen, and his disciples, Mike Raynor at Deloitte Research and Scott Anthony at Innosight. Here is the short introduction to the approach (http://www.forbes.com/forbes/2003/1013/082_print.html). The slightly longer, but more detailed version can easily be found online in the Spring 2007 MIT Sloan Management Review article, “ Finding the Right Job For Your Product”. Once you’re on top of it, you might share it with your sister as she thinks about the print market in Halifax.

The course you’re contemplating recommending, segmenting by target attributes (i.e. using D&B data and looking at size of company), seems straightforward and easy but that’s because that’s the data--the only data--to which you readily have access. The danger of recommending this traditional approach to segmentation is that if your sister pursues it, it will surely lead her into to zero-sum competition with other print & ad agencies in the Halifax. She will be hard-pressed to find sustainable new opportunities this way.
market_segmentation  market_research  marketing  Michael_Raynor  Clayton_Christensen  advice 
november 2011 by jerryking
A Shout-Out for Segmentation Data - BusinessWeek
March 15, 2011, BusinessWeek By G. Michael Maddock and
Raphael Louis Vitón .Quit yawning and start seizing on the wealth
within segmentation data. Every department should demand to see this
information. a simple, three-part formula:

Step 1. Define success. Get as specific as possible. Step 2. Define the
characteristics you want your segment to have. Step 3. "Simply" find
what predicts/correlates with these variables.

Having decided whom you want to go after, find the variables that will
lead you to these people. Asking Lots of Questions

Having identified this market, you go out and ask the potential
customers within it as many questions as you can think of—how much they
weigh, what snacks they eat, whether they have kids or a pet. Then you
sort through the data and look for commonalities (Step 3).
segmentation  market_segmentation  market_research  questions  JCK  sorting  correlations  predictive_analytics  ethnography  think_threes 
march 2011 by jerryking
How SMBs Can Profit From Local Online Advertising
May 26, 2010 | InformationWeek | By Benjamin Tomkins. First
build a great website, second measure it. No matter what business, you
need to take those steps.
Yodle  market_segmentation  small_business  City_Voice  Google  local_advertising  websites  Foursquare 
july 2010 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: The circles (no more strangers)
Posted by Seth Godin on May 17, 2010

Consider this hierarchy: Strangers, Friends, Listeners, Customers,
Sneezers, Fans and True Fans. One true fan is worth perhaps 10,000 times
as much as a stranger. And yet if you're in search of strangers, odds
are you're going to mistreat a true fan in order to seduce yet another
stranger who probably won't reward you much.
Seth_Godin  customer_loyalty  segmentation  market_segmentation  marketing  superfans  customer_segmentation 
june 2010 by jerryking
New approaches to quantifying the spread of infect... [Nat Rev Microbiol. 2005] - PubMed result
Traditional approaches to mathematical modelling of infectious
diseases deal most effectively with large outbreaks in large
populations. The desire to elucidate the highly variable dynamics of
disease spread amongst small numbers of individuals has fuelled the
development of models that depend more directly on surveillance and
contact-tracing data. This signals a move towards a closer interplay
between epidemiological modelling, surveillance and disease-management
strategies.
models  mathematics  surveillance  disease  disease_surveillance  market_segmentation  size  flu_outbreaks  epidemiology  infections 
march 2010 by jerryking
Luxury Institute Segments Wealthy Consumer Market;
Marketer-friendly Format of Fed Data Provides Actionable
Insights for Banks, Brokers, Realtors, Luxury Goods Firms, Travel
Providers, Wealth Managers, and More
Business Wire. New York: Jun 8, 2006. pg. 1
ProQuest  luxury  high_net_worth  market_segmentation  data  travel  customer_segmentation 
march 2010 by jerryking
Too many pots
Sept. 2003 | Profit. | by Rick Spence. Abel and Cain fell
into a common trap: targeting the broadest market possible. By trying to
please too many people at once, they were unable to make deep
connections with customers and event sponsors. Sure, their potential
market was huge, but as Abel admits, "We weren't providing enough
value." Niche markets pay better than mass markets; it's a classic
entrepreneurial lesson, but one that many people learn the hard way. If
one were starting a beverage company today, find the niches Pepsi and
Coke don't own - as Cott Corp. did with bargain-priced house brands.
Unlike the markets Cain and Abel had previously wooed, the people who
attended these events had pressing information and self-development
needs, and were willing to pay for events that fulfilled those needs.
"Specializing opened up markets that we could never reach before," says
Abel. "There turns out to be no shortage of niche markets. The closer
you look, the more you see."
ProQuest  Rick_Spence  entrepreneur  market_segmentation  specialization  targeting  lessons_learned  partnerships  value_propositions  niches  Pepsi  Cott  Coca-Cola  customer_segmentation  mass_markets  emotional_connections  market_intelligence  private_information 
february 2010 by jerryking
Innovation in Emerging Markets | Articles | Chief Executive - The magazine for the Chief Executive Officer
January/February 2010, Posted On: 1/29/2010

Innovation in Emerging Markets

Three critical factors should not be overlooked in any strategy aimed at emerging markets.
By Scott Anthony
emerging_markets  Scott_Anthony  Innosight  C.K._Prahalad  market_segmentation  business_models  rethinking  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  think_threes 
february 2010 by jerryking
It's the Purpose Brand, Stupid - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 29, 2005 | Wall Street Journal | by CLAYTON M.
CHRISTENSEN, SCOTT COOK and TADDY HALL. Carving up markets by product,
price point or customer type often causes marketers to deliver products
overloaded with unwanted features or designed to improve on a product or
appeal to a demographic profile -- but not necessarily real customers.
the marketer's fundamental task is not so much to understand the
customer as it is to understand what jobs customers need to do -- and
build products that serve those specific purposes.
Clayton_Christensen  disruption  product_innovation  product_launches  innovation  market_segmentation  Marriott  failure  Coca-Cola  customer_insights  feature_overload  purpose  contextual  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  brand_purpose 
january 2010 by jerryking
Why a Product’s Job Matters
April 18, 2007 | - The Informed Reader - WSJ | by Robin
Moroney. A basic principle of business–knowing what consumers want from
a particular product–is often ignored by corporations. Many businesses
focus on qualities that are largely irrelevant to the consumers’ buying
decisions, such as product prices, or data on customer age, gender and
marital status. Some business-to-business companies slice their markets
by industry; others by size of business. The problem with such
segmentation schemes is that they are static. Customers’ buying
behaviors change far more often than their demographics, psychographics
or attitudes. This leads to situations in which, in the words of the
late business guru Peter Drucker, “the customer rarely buys what the
business thinks it sells him.”
Peter_Drucker  Clayton_Christensen  Scott_Anthony  segmentation  marketing  market_segmentation  static  dynamic  purchase_decisions  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  B2B  demographics  psychographics  attitudes  demographic_information  relevance  consumer_behavior  behavioral_change  irrelevance 
january 2010 by jerryking
Are You Ready for the Future?
Feb 2006 | Book Business: Vol. 9, Iss. 1; pg. 42, 7 pgs | by Brian R Hook.
publishing  segmentation  Gadi_Prager  market_segmentation 
december 2009 by jerryking
How to Brand Sand
April 1, 1998 | Strategy + Business Issue 11 | by Sam I.
Hill, Jack McGrath, and Sandeep Dayal. In commodity-goods markets,
price is usually the only differentiator. But if you can brand those
goods and bundle them with services, even bricks and sand can command
premium prices. Here is how to turn commodities into branded goods.
howto  branding  commodities  commoditization  market_research  market_segmentation  differentiation  bundling 
october 2009 by jerryking
Creating A Killer Product
10.13.03 | Forbes Magazine | by Clayton M. Christensen & Michael E. Raynor.

Three in five new-product-development efforts are scuttled before they ever reach the market. Of the ones that do see the light of day, 40% never become profitable and simply disappear.

Most of these failures are predictable--and avoidable. Why? Because most managers trying to come up with new products don't properly consider the circumstances in which customers find themselves when making purchasing decisions. Or as marketing expert Theodore Levitt once told his M.B.A. students at Harvard: "People don't want to buy a quarter-inch drill. They want a quarter-inch hole." ...Managers need to segment their markets to mirror the way their customers experience life--and not base decisions on irrelevant data that focus on customer attributes. Managers need to realize that customers, in effect, "hire" products to do specific "jobs."...Why not put in tiny chunks of real fruit to add a dimension of unpredictability and anticipation--attacking the boredom factor. A thicker shake would last longer. A self-service shake machine that could be operated with a prepaid card would get customers in and out fast.

Improvements like this would succeed in building sales--but not by capturing milk shake sales from competing quick-service chains or by cannibalizing other products on its menu. Rather, the growth would come by taking business from products in other categories that customers sometimes employed, with limited satisfaction, to get their particular jobs done. And perhaps more important, the products would find new growth among "nonconsumers." Competing with nonconsumption often offers the biggest source of growth in a world of one-size-fits-all products. ...One option would be for RIM to believe its market is structured by product categories, as in: "We compete in handheld wireless devices." WRONG!!!!!!!!!!!!!...But what if RIM structured the segments of this market according to the jobs that people are trying to get done? Just from watching people who pull out their BlackBerrys, it seems to us that most of them are hiring it to help them be productive in small snippets of time that otherwise would be wasted, like reading e-mails while waiting in line at airports....Features that do not help customers do the job that they hire the BlackBerry for wouldn't be viewed as improvements at all. ...Brands are, at the beginning, hollow words into which marketers stuff meaning. If a brand's meaning is positioned on a job to be done, then when the job arises in a customer's life, he or she will remember the brand and hire the product. Customers pay significant premiums for brands that do a job well.
Clayton_Christensen  Michael_Raynor  Innosight  prepaid  innovation  market_segmentation  customer_experience  arms_race  branding  product_development  education  Colleges_&_Universities  Theodore_Levitt  disruption  new_products  customer_segmentation  observations  nonconsumption  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  one-size-fits-all  BlackBerry 
september 2009 by jerryking
Finding the Right Job For Your Product
Spring 2007 | MIT Sloan Management Review | by Clayton M.
Christensen, Scott D. Anthony, Gerald Berstell and Denise Nitterhouse.
What is the "job" the product is being hired to do? Segment according to
this.
market_segmentation  Clayton_Christensen  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  Innosight  innovation  Scott_Anthony  ProQuest  customer_segmentation 
august 2009 by jerryking

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