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jerryking : markets   14

The Lease They Can Do: What the Fight Over 'Used' Music Reveals About Online Media
April 03, 2013 | Businessweek | By Paul Ford.

What is a song worth to Spotify or competitors such as Rdio? To them, a song is an entry in a very large database—and they solve the licensing problem by managing the licenses in bulk, then allowing listeners access to their libraries of music. At some level, Spotify is not a music service but a license clearinghouse that specializes in music....So far, the large music labels have been able to negotiate with streaming services, but as the streaming music players get bigger their power will increase; Spotify is apparently looking for price breaks from the major labels.

The big question now is not “whose album gets made?” but more “who gets to listen?” Not just who, but when—and who gets paid for the privilege? Oh, for the days when record stores featured bootlegs and cats. The clerks might have been snotty, but at least you didn’t have to have endless discussions about databases and doctrine. No one, anywhere, had to know how often you listened to Supertramp.

That’s another part of the puzzle. Streaming services generate a tremendous amount of data that has value of its own; sooner or later it will be used to make decisions about what gets produced....So this is not about technology. Nor is it really about music. This is about determining the optimal strategy for mass licensing of digital artifacts. Songs are the commodity but the licenses are currency....So this is the task: Figure out how to make money, reward artists enough that they continue to make new things, and pacify the labels and studios, while also creating something that doesn’t rip off, confuse, or upset the audience. If someone can do that, then why stick to movies, music, or perhaps books? New forms of media could be sold as well. Tumblr blogs, animated GIFs, casual games, and the like could all flow into such systems. Right now, when media objects are sold, it’s often as art (like the six-second Vine video called “Tits on Tits on Ikea” that artist Andrea Washko recently sold for $200). A massive marketplace in ridiculous pictures could emerge. Flickr (YHOO)could turn into a mall. Pinterest could become … Pintere$t.
clearinghouses  music  online  Rdio  Spotify  streaming  licensing  licensing_rights  downloads  musicians  music_industry  databases  digital_artifacts  artists  markets  data  music_labels  Flickr  Pinterest  music_catalogues 
april 2013 by jerryking
With Smartphone Deals, Patents Become a New Asset Class - NYTimes.com
September 24, 2012, 1:21 pm4 Comments
With Smartphone Deals, Patents Become a New Asset Class
By STEVE LOHR

patents have become a new asset class.

Traditionally, patents sat on corporate shelves and were occasionally used as bargaining chips in cross-licensing deals with competitors. But that began to change in the 1990s, when technology companies like Texas Instruments and I.B.M. started to regard their patent portfolios as sources of revenue, licensing their intellectual property for fees.

Today, companies routinely buy and sell patents, mostly in deals that draw little attention, for millions of dollars instead of billions. The question, experts say, is how big the market will become.

“Patents are a tricky asset to trade,” said Josh Lerner, an economist at the Harvard Business School. “But there is clearly a huge amount of value in intellectual property. And I think what we’re seeing is the beginning of a lot more monetization and trading of intellectual property rights.”

A sizable specialist industry has developed to build the marketplace for trading ideas. The players include patent aggregators like Intellectual Ventures and RPX, patent brokers like Ocean Tomo and ICAP, hedge funds, investment banks and law firms.
property_rights  smartphones  patents  intellectual_property  law_firms  Steve_Lohr  valuations  Ocean_Tomo  markets  monetization  portfolio_management  cross-licensing  asset_classes 
september 2012 by jerryking
Don't Just Do Something! - WSJ.com
January 25, 2008

Markets are a discovery process, with firms and investors learning as they try new ideas and react to changed conditions. What markets need is a stable regulatory environment, in which every dip in the market doesn't produce a new set of rules.
banking  banks  business_models  David_Wessel  discoveries  letters_to_the_editor  rules_of_the_game  markets  market_corrections  regulations 
june 2012 by jerryking
Markets Information
Fresh Produce Alliance
www.freshproducealliance.com
markets  information  farming  agriculture  Canadian  Ontario  pricing  decision_making 
may 2012 by jerryking
Data markets aren't coming. They're already here
26 January 2011 | O'Reilly Radar| by Julie Steele.

Jud Valeski is cofounder and CEO of Gnip, a social media data provider
that aggregates feeds from sites like Twitter, Facebook, Flickr,
delicious, and others into one API.

Jud will be speaking at Strata next week on a panel titled "What's Mine
is Yours: the Ethics of Big Data Ownership."
Find out more about growing business of data marketplaces at a "Data
Marketplaces" panel with Ian White of Urban Mapping, Peter Marney of
Thomson Reuters and Dennis Yang of Infochimps.

What do you wish more people understood about data markets and/or the
way large datasets can be used?

Jud Valeski: First, data is not free, and there's always someone out
there that wants to buy it. As an end-user, educate yourself with how
the content you create using someone else's service could ultimately be
used by the service-provider. Second, black markets are a real problem,
and just because "everyone else is doing it" doesn't mean it's okay.
markets  data  data_ownership  analytics  massive_data_sets  digital_economy  black_markets  Infochimps  Gnip  Thomson_Reuters  commercialization  data_scientists  data_marketplaces  social_data  financial_data  content_creators 
may 2011 by jerryking
KKR Evolves, Hiring Trading Team From Goldman - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 21, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By GREGORY
ZUCKERMAN Evolution at KKR: Goldman's Genetics, The move KKR. to hire a
team of stock traders from Goldman Sachs is a sign of change sweeping
the private-equity industry. Prestigious buyout firms are plunging into
stock & bond trading, underwriting, & hedge funds, and away from
the LBOs that earned them fame and fortune. As recently as 2004, $14.4
B of KKR's $15.1 B of assets came from leveraged buyouts. Today, after
diving into debt trading, only $41B of its $54.4 B portfolio is from LBO
investments. And KKR, whose stock now trades publicly as KKR & Co.,
is actively examining a push into other businesses, according to people
close to the matter....Top executives at KKR and other firms argue that
in their research on buyout deals they uncover other investing
opportunities, such possible debt and stock purchases, that they can't
profit from without operating other kinds of investment vehicles.
diversification  private_equity  KKR  markets  buyouts  market_research  leverage  stocks  carve_outs 
october 2010 by jerryking
Havocscope Black Market Products Ranking : Havocscope Black Market – Statistics, Data and Crime News
May 30, 2010 | Havocscope Black Market Products Ranking Total: $1.86 Trillion
Average Product: $21.96 Billion
markets  black_markets  illicit 
may 2010 by jerryking
Is the best almost over?
Jun 30, 2006, The Globe and Mail (Index-only). Toronto, Ont.:
pg. 33 by Doug Steiner.

I've applied Michard and Bouchaud's theories in my own far-less-rigorous
studies of three recent market trends: the spread of monster homes, the
huge run-up in commodity prices and the frenzy over the Tim Hortons
share issue last March.
....So, based on all the studies, I have some thoughts on how to get in and out of the market: Buy only quality stocks that aren't the subject of mass opinion-in other words, out-of-favour stocks. Avoid comparative evaluations of hot stocks, like saying RIM or Apple isn't all that overvalued relative to its peers. Finally, to make big money, you have to sell when everyone is talking about your investments. Or, as at a concert, clap along with others for a while, then dash for the doors.
contrarians  Doug_Steiner  markets  market_timing  social_theory  trends 
march 2009 by jerryking
reportonbusiness.com: What? Me worry?(2)
September 26, 2007 From Friday's Globe and Mail by Doug Steiner

....after opening the most recent monthly statements from my asset-dieting RSPs, I haven't been smiling. And I've had to give myself advice about market risk-again. "I turned the October, 1987, crevasse into a hill of savings years ago. My strategy? Solve the following complex equation: Cash In - Cash Out = Savings. If you include a time element in the equation for retirement, it looks like this: Future Savings - Future Spending = Not Living Only On CPP. "....Here is some good and rational advice: If you have equity investments and this worry thing is really getting to you, take a breather. Think about shifting all your savings into good old Government of Canada treasury bills for six months. Want a little more action? Add some ETFs that track stock market indexes to your portfolio-that will give you market volatility similar to what you had when you were sleeping well before the markets went berserk.

But the best rational advice I can give you is to learn the discipline of setting risk limits and sticking to them. That will allow you to live with any volatility in the markets. It really is that simple.
Doug_Steiner  markets  risk-perception  calm  risk-assessment  panics  self-discipline  volatility  risk-limits  ETFs  retirement  risks  GoC 
march 2009 by jerryking
Beyond Fair Trade - WSJ.com
JUNE 16, 2008 WSJ article by SHARA TIBKEN on niche online marketplaces for artists and craftspeople.
artists  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  marketing  small_business  markets  Etsy  handmade 
february 2009 by jerryking
The Boom Is Over. Long Live the Art! - NYTimes.com
February 12, 2009 NYT article By HOLLAND COTTER. The economic
downturn will force a new mindset on the art industry. Make art schools
interdisciplinary, complete with work terms in unorthodox locales (e.g.
prisons, hospitals, etc.). The 21st century will almost certainly see
consciousness-altering changes in digital access to knowledge and in the
shaping of visual culture. What will artists do with this?
artists  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  innovation  creativity  visual_culture  markets  rethinking  reinvention  fine_arts  interdisciplinary  unconventional_thinking  creative_renewal  21st._century  mindsets  unorthodox  cross-disciplinary  cross-pollination  workplaces 
february 2009 by jerryking

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