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jerryking : masculinity   31

Moonlight bravely aims to create a fuller picture of black masculinity - The Globe and Mail
ANDRAY DOMISE
Special to The Globe and Mail Last updated: Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016

Moonlight is an undeniably beautiful coming-of-age story told in three parts, adapted from playwright Tarell McCraney’s In Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue. To say it tells the story of a young man growing up is true, and to say this film is a cinematic achievement is also true, but both are understatements. In film, literature and especially the evening news, black masculinity is rarely explored as more than a pathology – gnarled and twisted by crime, poverty and broken families. Through striking visuals and muted, simmering performances from the cast, Jenkins diffracts a broad range of black stereotypes and masterfully reunites them with their missing layers of humanity.
films  TIFF  movies  African-Americans  masculinity  Andray_Domise  Moonlight  coming-of-age  '80s  multidimensional  Miami  stereotypes  think_threes 
october 2016 by jerryking
A Style Guide That’s Man’s Best Friend - WSJ
By NICK REMSEN
Sept. 7, 2016

From Amazon:
Men and Style reaches beyond standard “what to wear” advice: It is equal parts style guide and intriguing conversation about the masculine identity within the world of fashion. David Coggins explores the history of men’s style and learns from some of the most notable tastemakers in the industry and beyond. Its essays and interviews discuss the lessons men learned from their fathers, the mistakes they made as young men, and how they emerged to become better men. Some of the most dapper men in the world discuss bad mustaches, misguided cologne choices, and unfortunate prom tuxedos. All the men here have arrived at a place in the world and have a keen understanding about how they fit in it. Men and Style celebrates singular men who’ve lived well and can tell us about how they earned their worldview. They’re smart enough to absorb the wisdom that’s hidden in the world, and even smarter to wear that wisdom lightly.
stylish  books  mens'_clothing  taste-makers  masculinity  fashion  opinon_makers  worldviews 
september 2016 by jerryking
Courses in Manhood for African-American Boys - The New York Times
FEB. 4, 2016 | NYT | By PATRICIA LEIGH BROWN.

While lower grades focus on the stories, legacies and images of black people, high school students take a deep dive into African-American history and culture, from ancient civilizations to the civil rights movement to contemporary media. All classes are taught by black male instructors whose own experiences and perspectives provide a multidimensional understanding of the students they mentor (in Oakland, as elsewhere, more than half the teachers are white and most are women).
African-Americans  coming-of-age  cultural_identity  high_schools  history  life_skills  male  masculinity  mentoring  Oakland  rituals  students  values 
february 2016 by jerryking
When killers target women, why do moderate men stand silent? - The Globe and Mail
DENISE BALKISSOON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, May. 26 2014
women  misogyny  masculinity  silence 
may 2014 by jerryking
45 Ultimate Tips For Men. Number 40 Will Help You Go Far In Life.
45 Ultimate Tips For Men. Number 40 Will Help You Go Far In Life.
18th March 2014
advice  lists  tips  inspiration  masculinity  relationships 
march 2014 by jerryking
The gathering storm
Jun 18, 2013 | Trinidad Express Newspaper | By Rolph Balgobin.

A darker and more invidious force is also developing in our society bizarrely masked by these surface ripples of discontent. It is a counterculture, which has a vastly different value system to the mainstream. This phenomenon has been treated as a social issue—in fact it is rapidly morphing into a challenge for the economic, political and security systems in our society as well.

There are large and growing parts of this country where the law does not rule. Where the police cannot go, except in force. Being there is like being in another dimension. Time slows, and values are extremely different to the rest of the society. We work for what we have, they take what they want. We take the long view, they think short term. We hope to die old, they are prepared to die young. We value dedication, they value least effort. We contemplate, they proliferate—more young men to kill tomorrow.

This has gone from a criminal fringe to a full culture, which is rising up and challenging the law-abiding society. This is a monster, and it intends to destroy our democracy. The media only reports the murders—it misses the causes.

Our sociologists have only imperfectly described, far less explained, the very serious nature of what is before us. And so the challenge continues to grow while we use race and ethnicity to explain little black boys killing each other. This is a misdiagnosis.
op-ed  Caribbean  thug_code  dysfunction  killings  violence  values  Trinidad_&_Tobago  men  masculinity  Afro-Guyanese  Afro-Caribbeans  sociologists  race  root_cause  ethnicity  counterculture  lawlessness  cultural_values  value_systems 
july 2013 by jerryking
Celebrate boys’ boyness – and work with it -
Nov. 17 2012 |The Globe and Mail |by Margaret Wente.

Several public school systems have launched all-boys’ schools for failing boys. In New York, the Eagle Academy for Young Men is achieving impressive results for minority boys in a tough neighbourhood. These schools demand a lot. Their ethos is: We’ll help you succeed, but we’ll be tough on you, and you must claim responsibility. (By contrast, the attitude of Ontario’s public schools toward difficult boys is: We’ll let you pass if you leave us alone.)

If boys are failing schools and schools are failing boys, it’s really not too hard to see some of the reasons why. They really are fish out of water. Before the Industrial Revolution, boys spent their time with fathers and uncles, often engaged in strenuous physical activity. Now they spend their time in the world of women, sitting behind desks. If schools threw out the desks, they’d probably be a lot happier.

But schools can’t give them everything they need. Boys also need the company of men – men who will guide, instruct, esteem, respect and understand them. When asked about the happiest experience of their lives, boys often say it was the time they made something with their fathers. Their mothers matter, too – but, sometimes, there’s no substitute for Dad.
Margaret_Wente  masculinity  gender_gap 
february 2013 by jerryking
Manhood and the Power of Glory
February 26, 1990 | TIME | by Lance Morrow

The movie Glory is, as the historian James M. McPherson has written, the most powerful and historically accurate film ever made about the American Civil War. But Glory, which tells the story of one of the war’s first black regiments, has deeper meaning. The movie addresses the most profound theme of race in America in 1990. Glory is about black manhood and responsibility.
The worst problems of the black underclass today—young black men murdering other young black men; young black males fathering children of females who are virtually children themselves; young blacks lost to crack and heroin—alI connect directly to black manhood and responsibility.
African-Americans  history  movies  Civil_War  masculinity  responsibility  fatherhood  self-help  heroes  inspiration 
september 2012 by jerryking
Some speculative truth about Canada’s new gun crime - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 20 2012 | The Globe and Mail | James Sheptycki.

So we have a poisonous mixture: A pistolized culture of masculinity. A socio-economic structure of exclusion. An illicit opportunity structure in the market for illegal drugs. And rising levels of gun availability on the streets.

There is probably even more to it than that, since society’s reactions are often one-sided. Some people advocate cracking down on the drug economy. Some advocate drug decriminalization. Some say banning guns or bullets will work, or that we need stiffer penalties. Others want better social programs.

These policy struggles, playing out in the context of fiscal crisis, are most often discussed in hyper-masculine terms. Looking for the cheapest bang for the buck, we end up “combatting gangs” or “fighting crime” while going to “war on drugs.”

These amount to attempts at repression. But repression does not solve problems; it displaces them. This suggests that the solutions become part of the problem.

This issue is extremely complex, but these speculations are the start of a plausible explanation to what has been taking place in Canada for some time. But they are only a start.

There is a demand for quick and easy solutions, and the solutions had better be cost-effective and inexpensive. There is impatience when the response from academic criminologists is for further research.

But in the face of such complexity, and to test our understanding, Canadians need to demand evidence-based policymaking. Rationality and reason are required, as well as political will. Gut instinct is no good.
Toronto  violence  evidence_based  research  criminality  masculinity  illicit  drugs  economy  social_exclusion  guns  gut_feelings  policymaking 
july 2012 by jerryking
BBC News - African-Caribbean boys 'would rather hustle than learn'
20 October 2011 | BBC | By Hannah Richardson BBC News education reporter.

African-Caribbean boys 'would rather hustle than learn'
achievement_gaps  African_Canadians  Caribbean  homophobia  United_Kingdom  high_schools  racial_disparities  hustle  men  masculinity  Afro-Caribbeans 
may 2012 by jerryking
Black on Black HOPE
September 15, 2005 | The Caribbean Camera | Lennox Farell
Toronto  urban  African_Canadians  murders  violence  masculinity  teaching  churches  Afro-Caribbeans 
march 2012 by jerryking
The 'H' Word - WSJ.com
APRIL 12, 2007 | WSJ | By LIONEL TIGER.

The coercive trend is that ordinary African-American males earn decreasing amounts of money compared to women of their community. They are more accident-prone, more imprisoned and have frailer family lives than women do. Is this why they smoothly call them whores, out of desperate resentment at their own ineffectuality?

There are structural reasons for this beyond the craven crumminess of popular culture. When African and Arab slavers captured people for the New World, they preferred to break up families. Subsequent slave-owning policies sustained that pattern. As well, many slaves were taken from West African societies in which biological mothers and fathers didn't necessary share child caretaking but mother and her brother did. When I lived in Ghana years ago, Christian families with father and mother in the household were called "same muddah same fadduh" in the street. It's likely that continuities persist, as they certainly do in Caribbean societies.

There's also a massive contemporary reason for the invidiousness many African-American men feel in the presence of women -- their relative failure in a school system which broadly favors females. By college age, there is a sharp fall-off of male enrollment in general and of African-American men specifically.
Colleges_&_Universities  slang  basketball  women  family_breakdown  athletes_&_athletics  race  languages  profanity  misogyny  African-Americans  gender_gap  slavery  masculinity  Afro-Caribbeans  disrespect 
november 2011 by jerryking
Why Boxing Is Worth Fighting For - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 17, 2011| WSJ | By GORDON MARINO. Doctors who want
to deprive kids of the 'sweet science' fail to weigh its benefits
against its dangers. ...The "Wall Street Journal" recently carried a
column that suggested the five best sports book ever written. The column
recommended the novel "The Professional" by W.C. Heinz (published in
1958). Want to guess the sport? Boxing. I bought the novel and read it.

Heinz, a sportswriter, is probably best known for writing "M.A.S.H.",
which was adapted to become the hit movie and television show.

In the second chapter of "The Professional", Heinz writes this about
boxing:

“The rest of us have to prove our manliness, or something, by standing
up to some guy. A fighter never has that urge because he gets rid of it
in his work. That’s why I say that, when everything else is equal,
fighters are the best adjusted males in the world.”

Couldn't America benefit from more well-adjusted males?

Thanks again, coach.
sports  boxing  deprivations  masculinity 
september 2011 by jerryking
How to Raise Boys That Read (As Much as Girls Do): Not With Gross-Out Books and Video Game Bribes - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 24, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By THOMAS SPENCE. Hint: Not with gross-out books and video-game bribes.
masculinity  fatherhood  parenting  howto  reading 
october 2010 by jerryking
Bridging the Gap Between Fathers, Adult Daughters
JUNE 15, 2010 | WSJ.com | By ELIZABETH BERNSTEIN. Finding Dad's Softer Side.
fatherhood  relationships  masculinity  daughters 
june 2010 by jerryking
Less Educated Men Face Brutal Job Market - WSJ.com
MAY 6, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By DAVID WESSEL. It's
hard to exaggerate how bad the job market is. Here's one arresting fact:
One of every five men 25 to 54 isn't working. Even more alarming, the
jobs that many of these men, or those like them, once had in
construction, factories and offices aren't coming back. "A good guess…is
that when the economy recovers five years from now, one in six men who
are 25 to 54 will not be working," Lawrence Summers, the president's
economic adviser, said the other day.
David_Wessel  unemployment  African-Americans  gender_gap  masculinity  joblessness 
may 2010 by jerryking
Guys Left Behind - WSJ.com
JUNE 2, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | By MARK PENN with E.
Kinney Zalesne. Women are succeeding in an ever-widening range of areas,
while there is a statistically significant and growing group of guys
who are just not going to make it.
Mark_Penn  gender_gap  microtrends  masculinity  achievement_gaps 
june 2009 by jerryking

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